Choosing K - For a child who is already reading, ideas & encouragement

God's Creation From A to Z: A Complete Kindergarten Curriculum
zeo2ski
Posts: 10
Joined: Fri Jan 28, 2011 6:38 pm

Re: When kids teach themselves to read...??

Unread post by zeo2ski » Fri Sep 02, 2011 1:31 pm

Thanks for all the ideas. So the memorizing and guessing now won't lead to trouble later on? I'm fine with doing MFW K as written and Noah Webster now and then. The writing is a concern. I could see him getting sick of it if he had to do too much writing at this point, and it wouldn't hurt to spend some more time at this level to really nail down proper letter formation. We do lots of add on stuff (my degree is in early childhood education) and I do enjoy getting new ideas from this forum too!

I had thought about pulling the phonics out of MFW 1 and using that along with K...is that possible, the way it's set up or is the writing too integrated? I will look at the thread for teaching K and 1 together, thanks.

Julie in MN
Posts: 2928
Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 3:44 pm
Location: Minnesota

Re: When kids teach themselves to read...??

Unread post by Julie in MN » Fri Sep 02, 2011 2:32 pm

zeo2ski wrote:So the memorizing and guessing now won't lead to trouble later on?
Hmmm, I think what you're saying is, "If I don't do phonics for another year, my son will keep memorizing and guessing." Is that what you're wondering about?

If so, I think the thing is that K *is* doing phonics. It's just doing the foundational phonics, not the whole gamut. It's building a strong foundation.

Kinda like my son who is doing driver's ed. He's a kid who figured out how to drive in about kindergarten (unlike myself, who didn't even know where to put the key in my driver's ed class :~ ). So all along the way, he's been commenting on drivers and driving rules and signage and whatnot. And to prevent any wrong info getting cemented in his brain, I didn't forbid him to look at the road, but I didn't put him in a driver's ed class at 7, either. Instead, I chatted with him. Lots of, "Oh, why do you think that?" And, "What do you think that sign means?" Or, "Why did I move over into the next lane?" And even though he knew a lot by the time he was ready to drive, he still went through the complete Drivers Ed.

If you don't feel able to discuss phonics with your son, you could get ahold of the 1st manual in advance and find pertinent things to discuss. Or, you could look up a list of phonics rules online to have on hand for conversation. I'm always posting my favorite two lists online:
https://archive.lewrockwell.com/taylor/taylor79.html
http://www.dyslexia.org/spelling_rules.shtml

HTH,
Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

Wendy B.
Posts: 127
Joined: Tue Apr 07, 2009 6:27 pm

Re: When kids teach themselves to read...??

Unread post by Wendy B. » Fri Sep 02, 2011 3:56 pm

zeo2ski wrote:Yes exactly that. I think if I don't keep him progressing in some phonics instruction, he's going to keep figuring out a way to do it himself. I do not feel comfortable discussing the phonics stuff like you were saying (although that's exactly the approach I would LIKE to take right now), I was never taught phonics and I don't know any of the rules.

I agree, K is doing phonics and it does build a good foundation. But DS has been reading short vowel words (including blends) well for a year already. The foundation is solid, and review doesn't hurt, but I feel like at this point I need to either move on to new rules or take away all books from him other than staged readers. Obviously I'm not going to do that lol. A list of rules does help for me to see, but I'm still not confident because there are those exceptions to the rules and I never know what they are as we're reading through a real book.
I would not encourage guessing or memorizing.

Options
1. to use the Noah Webster's blue back speller that you already own. Spend a few minutes each day having him decode words in the book. F/U with MFW 1 when he is first grade age.
2. Work through the phonics portion of MFW1 slowly. You will need a plan if the writing proves too much for a 5 yo boy.
3. Use a different phonics program this year. F/U with MFW 1 when he is first grade age.

How much adaptation do you want to do?

If you choose blue back speller or another phonics program you would simply need to spend 15-20 min a day working on a page or two at his pace. When he is first grade age, start MFW 1 which will give him a solid review of phonics he has learned, and teach him any phonics that he didn't learn during this year. I used MFW1 to review phonics with a 2nd grader, and it was a great year.

If you decide to use MFW 1 with a 5 yo, you will likely need to slow it down or make other types of adaptations in regards to writing.

HTH
Wendy B.
Graduated ds '08 & dd '09
Homeschooling ds 11 & dd 8 using RtR
completed: MFW 1, ADV, ECC & CtG.

Cyndi (AZ)
Posts: 543
Joined: Mon Jun 18, 2007 4:22 pm

Re: When kids teach themselves to read...??

Unread post by Cyndi (AZ) » Fri Sep 02, 2011 4:06 pm

My dd figured out how to read really young, too. I just wanted to answer your question about the MFW1 phonics being tied-into the writing. I would say, yes, it is very tied-in. If it were me, I would not pull out the "phonics" to do separately from the Bible notebook and writing. Just my opinion.

Have you considered letting him watch the Leap Frog videos? They teach phonics rules in fun songs - there's short vowels, long vowels, consonant blends. That might be a gentle intro and help to him while he's waiting up to grow into being ready for 1st grade. Even though my dd could read well we still went through MFW1 as written and if I couldn't explain the rule clearly, I'd start singing . . . "when two vowels go walking, the first one does the talking . . . "
zeo2ski wrote:Hmm that's an idea. We have the Letter Factory one.

Thanks for the info on MFW 1. We'll skip that then. I think I'll look into a separate phonics program or some readers that would go along with the Noah blue book to reinforce the rules as we go. Then MFW1 will be a solid review of anything that overlaps next year. Any ideas? I always default to sing spell read and write.
Talking Words Factory and Code Word Caper are both packed with phonics, and super fun. I was glad I had those jingles to sing when we did MFW1. They helped ME know how to explain phonics. ;)
2018/19: US1877
used MFW from K through WHL

cbollin

How to stretch K curriculum when child knows letters/sou

Unread post by cbollin » Mon Nov 21, 2011 2:57 pm

teeniebeenie6 wrote:I live in Ohio which requires we give our Kindergartner 900 hours of school. MFW provides about 60-90 minutes of schooling per day but much of it is letter learning. My daughter knows both her letters and their sounds. I am curious what those of you who's children also knew their letters did to stretch your home-schooling hours? We just finished the Creation segment and LOVED it, I found it easy to add songs, crafts, etc. to our days but now that we are starting the first unit I am a little more stuck. I'd love your input and ideas. Thanks in advance. :)
Here are some idea to extend the phonics
http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php ... 179#p47744

if you need more in each unit for more books and activities, check here....
http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewforum.php?f=10

The other approach is in what you count for "hours". I don't think Ohio says you have to have seat work for all of that. At this age, you can count many things toward educational goals.
I would look at what to do when you get done with school, but are still doing educational learning activities. Here's a great thread for that:
http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=1829

I don't think you are limited to the required subjects as part of your 900 hours. If you do computer games that are educational, that counts. Music instrument. PE. cooking, cleaning - home ec.

Basically, for stretching our "hours", I've come to realize that educational time is part of everyday life. Every trip to the grocery store is a learning opportunity. Walks in the park. Nature walks. field trips. raking leaves and stopping raking leaves to talk to the neighbor who is doing the same (it's called real life socialization). Counting the bags of leaves that you raked. can you tell what our neighborhood did on Saturday? good thing too, lots of storms today.

Baking pumpkin bread. yum. Dress up and pretend time: I'm serious here -- dress up and pretend time at this age is part of Creative Writing Skills for the Pre Writer.

-crystal

CaseyVG
Posts: 35
Joined: Mon Jun 27, 2011 8:03 am

Re: How to stretch K curriculum when child knows letters/sou

Unread post by CaseyVG » Mon Nov 21, 2011 3:28 pm

I am also doing K right now, we are going to start Ww Water tomorrow. Have you tried looking at the ideas forum on here? Under the Kindergarten Ideas, there is a section for every unit. There are usually a lot of ideas, extra books, and links to websites with craft projects. I usually find extra crafts and coloring pages for every unit just because my kids beg for more, especially on a light day. You could probably find a DVD on each subject and count that as educational (I found a great one for the ocean we just covered). I agree with Crystal too, lots of everyday things could count as educational!
Casey
Casey

Caleb: ECC (finished MFW Adventures, 1st & K)
Rebekah: 1st (finished K)
Joshua: 2 year old
Matthew: baby
I blogged MFW K, 1st & Adventures at http://www.simplejoycrafting.blogspot.com

Yodergoat
Posts: 243
Joined: Thu Jun 09, 2011 2:14 pm

Re: How to stretch K curriculum when child knows letters/sou

Unread post by Yodergoat » Mon Nov 21, 2011 3:59 pm

We were in a similar boat with knowing letters and sounds well, so we made a focus of making sure that she knew her upper and lower case well by using matching games. We also worked on alphabetical order (by using games... I would scatter the flashcards all over the floor and she'd pick them up in the right order, or have to hop from A to B to C and so on). She started out not knowing alphabetical order at all (we did not sing the ABC song when she was little) to being quite good at it from games and writing the alphabet in order daily on primary lined paper. Now she also writes to 100 a couple times a week, her choice. She often does this in a notebook but also enjoys filling in (with dry erase marker) a copy of the "How many is 100?" chart in a clear page protector. If you have the cuisenaire rods, doing the activities in the book or just letting her play with them freely should count. I think that working any sort of puzzle, tangram, playing with letter tiles, sorting and counting items, even just drawing and coloring should count as "school."

We read lots of books on each unit, over and over again. I would certainly count that as school time... even the repeat readings! If anything was even vaguely related to the subject, we got that book from the library. We watched videos as appropriate for the unit... I would count that also. We did lots of writing here, because Gail loves to write. So we began a journal of sorts in which she would draw a picture and then dicate a sentence or two to me, then I would write them down and she would copy it into the journal. It's become one of her favorite parts of the school day and is something we will cherish.

She enjoys drawing and so would draw out the science experiments on paper. Such as for the raisin experiment she drew the progress of the raisin each day, for the leaf which was plucked off the plant she drew how it was withering, during A-a-apple we made a chart of drawings of the various types of apples we tasted and I wrote how we felt about each kind, when learning about birds she made a book with drawings of how eggs hatch and babies grow, etc. I don't think all of those charts were included in the Teacher's Manual.

These sorts of things really extended the school time each day, but I suppose the latter ideas are only good if your daughter enjoys writing and drawing.

All that sort of stuff does add up!

If your state expects 900 hours of "school" each year, and many school districts do about 180 days, then they are wanting about 5 hours a day? (Tennessee wants 180 days of about 4 hours a day, but you don't have to break it down or keep up with it strictly.) Surely they don't expect a kindergarten age child to spend five full hours doing seatwork and such each day .I remember in public school kindergarten, most of our day was not spent actively doing seatwork.... we played and colored and sometimes just sat around waiting. It was nowhere near 5 hours of actual "school."

But I think there are many things that count as learning! Just stretch it a little bit, be creative with what you call it, read some of those links that Crystal gave, and have fun like you did with the Creation unit!

All this should be taken with the proverbial grain o' salt, as I am just on the tenth unit! Not exactly what one would call "vast experience" on the subject!
I'm Shawna...
... a forgiven child of God since 1994 (age 16)
... happily wed to William since 1996
... mother of our long-awaited Gail (3/15/2006)
... missing 6 little ones (4 miscarriages, 2 ectopics)
... starting Rome to the Reformation this fall!

alisoncooks
Posts: 27
Joined: Mon Aug 17, 2009 12:44 pm

Re: How to stretch K curriculum when child knows letters/sou

Unread post by alisoncooks » Tue Nov 22, 2011 7:05 am

I haven't read all the responses so my apologies if this is a repeat suggstion....

But I'd throw several all-day field trips in there to help even things out a bit.
An educational video/movie every so often.
Helping mommy make lunch = educational!
Public library story time = educational! (and they have it in public school)

I'd count it all. :)
Married to DH since 2000, with 2 sweet girls (2006 & 2008).

cbollin

Re: How to stretch K curriculum when child knows letters/sou

Unread post by cbollin » Tue Nov 22, 2011 7:47 am

Yodergoat wrote: If your state expects 900 hours of "school" each year, and many school districts do about 180 days, then they are wanting about 5 hours a day? (Tennessee wants 180 days of about 4 hours a day, but you don't have to break it down or keep up with it strictly.) Surely they don't expect a kindergarten age child to spend five full hours doing seatwork and such each day .
Thankfully, that is not the expectation from what I"ve learned. It is 900 hours of "home education" over a school year (which does not have to be defined as Sept to May). So those 900 hours can include evenings, weekends, etc. No mention of how many days.

in ohio, "home education" is defined legally as "education primarily directed and provided by the parent". Home schooling parents are require to "assure" the hours are met when they file intent. It is my non legal opinion that over the natural course of a day, most of us who take homeschooling seriously spend that much time providing education - whether it is in the form of curriculum, or socialization (stop hitting your sister, stop that yelling! or playing at the park), or learning how to set the table, etc..... From the legal definitions of what is required, it's not 900 hours of seatwork or "curriculum". It's 900 hours of "home education" over course of a school year, which can be a full 365 days. Even "church attendance" can be part of home education. Nothing in the Ohio code that I've found says that all hours must be met by parents, but just that it is "primarily" done by parents.
alisoncooks wrote:I'd throw several all-day field trips in there to help even things out a bit.
I'd count it all. :)
agreeing...
in Ohio, one of the "required subjects" is Ohio history. Do that with age appropriate field trips. Visit your State Parks. visit local places of history. Does your child have sports interest? Well, focus on Ohio teams in that sport and learn a little something about them. Does your child like a certain kind of music? listen to someone from Ohio who plays that music. Seriously - those kinds of things are part of Ohio history and culture. go to the zoo. go ahead, get the membership.
Visit fire station. (count your travel time as part of the hours because brick and mortar schools get to)
Grocery Store visit - get to know the manager and ask for a tour of various departments. Or stop and just talk to the workers in various departments.

(having a moment of memory here.... when my oldest was kindy age, I use to point out that building in town is named for someone famous in our town/state history. Or wow! check this out - our toothpaste is Crest brand. Did you know that the man who is responsible for the original Crest worked in the same building that your daddy works in? Dr. Day is a really nice. find the fun little things in your town that make your town special. You may not have the Dalai Lama visiting, but you have something special to your town. My kids are learning all about Elvis these days. thank you. thank you very much. You can even learn the history of your local church congregation.

oh oh oh.... it was on another thread where I was babbling. This time of year - can your Kindy student help with holiday decorations, and sending Christmas cards, etc.? All of that is education. do family service projects -- get one parent to watch younger children, and other parent to sign up to ring the bells for Salvation Army. You can sign up in short shifts.

Yes, you can add more academics. Yes, you can add more hours in life and other. enjoy it all!

-crystal

teeniebeenie6
Posts: 2
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Re: How to stretch K curriculum when child knows letters/sou

Unread post by teeniebeenie6 » Wed Nov 23, 2011 11:00 am

cbollin wrote: It is 900 hours of "home education" over a school year (which does not have to be defined as Sept to May). So those 900 hours can include evenings, weekends, etc.
Our home-school notification form had a spot we had to sign that said, "Assurance that the child will be provided a minimum of nine hundred hours of home education each school year." Here in Columbus all Kindergartens are full day due to state testing. This was implemented in 1992 and was law until earlier this year. Now schools can opt out of all day kindergarten but from what I am reading most have decided not to. Columbus made the decision to keep full day kindergarten due to testing. The district also has a .pdf on their website that encourages parents of kids in kindergarten to: "Take your child to the Library, Zoo, Cosi, Metro Parks." They also say, "Give him many opportunities to use scissors, pencils, crayons, clay, paints and other art materials . . . ". And they says, "Read to your child everyday." I signed my name to the notification, so feel morally obligated to try to get in 900 hours of educational time. Our schedule now is 5 hour days just as if she was going to school, some days we have a shorter day due to interruptions but then make the time up on the weekend. I think it is sad how these state and standardised tests have made regular schools less and less fun. I recently read an article about how many school districts have even cut out break time (even for kindergartners) to make more time for schooling. Yikes!

Thank you for all the suggestions for getting more hours in. I truly appreciate your help and would appreciate any other suggestions you think of.

SarahP
Posts: 27
Joined: Wed Jul 27, 2011 9:31 am

Re: How to stretch K curriculum when child knows letters/sou

Unread post by SarahP » Wed Nov 23, 2011 11:36 am

I live in Ohio (near Cleveland) and I wholeheartedly agree with you that getting as much quality education hours as possible is good and right. However, 900 hours is about how long kids in brick and mortar schools get. BUT - this includes LOTS of down time - time waiting in line, time spent walking to specials like music, art and gym class, time wasted because there are "only" 20 minutes left of the day so why bother. Schools in general are not efficient in using time PLUS they are teaching 1 on 30 where homeschoolers are 1 on 1 - or in some cases 1 on a handful. But, you as a mom can see exactly where your child needs more work so there isn't time wasted doing things that are already mastered. My suggestion to you is to live and parent purposefully - answer questions when they come up, do enriching activities, be active, enjoy the world and life, follow the curriculum, add in things when you can, read good literature and provide a banquet of great picture and easy reader books from the library, go to church, join a sport or play sports games as a family etc. You will have no trouble confidently stating that your child got 900 hours of education.

Sarah

cbollin

Re: How to stretch K curriculum when child knows letters/sou

Unread post by cbollin » Wed Nov 23, 2011 11:50 am

There are a wide variety of opinions and methods of "home education". Doing school classroom at home is one option and one that if you are more comfortable as a new homeschooler to follow then do that :) and don't worry about what others say.

I completely agree with you that you want to have integrity in your decision. It is just that I do believe it is a route of integrity at age 5 to teach social skills, and etiquette and do it in a unit studies setting with table manners, home economics, etc.

Here are my reasons. I think all of those things are part of "social studies" for the age of the child you have. During those hours kindy kids are in classroom children are learning manners and social skills by having to line up for the lunch room and then have to meet expectations for cleaning the room (recycle bin, trash can, return tray, etc line up.... So if they are learning those skills while in school time during full day, I do believe with all integrity that homeschoolers can do the same in a home setting where skills are first being taught. Now, would I count it for my jr. high or high schooler? NO that would NOT be with intergity. (unless it were job skills for your youngest with special needs. but that's not important to the discussion) But in Kindy? Yes. You don't have to agree. But I feel like explaining my reasons. I hope that Sarah P's information is helpful to you to see that classroom and "home education" are not the same "hours"

I do think that at age 5, Manners and Etiquette are a legitimate and morally correct item to teach and most certainly would count as education. I have a curriculum suggestion for that. The Etiquette Factory. Perhaps you'd like to add that program to your day if it would boost your confidence toward meeting 900 hours.

some other ideas in my head for "home education" environment...
free style craft time
handiwork - learning something like crochet, or cross stitch, sewing
you'll laugh at me on this one: home decorating if they are given the assignment to organize their bed room (not just make the bed but really organize) or school room.
any bedtime reading - even if it is not part of curriculum.
proper techniques for tooth brushing...
learning to tie shoes (still working on that one with youngest!)
going to the park and playing hard. or swimming time at the local gym. or anything active really is Health and Wellness at this stage.

I know the MFW K program has music in the deluxe package... You can do all kinds of fun things with that. Or see about learning a music instrument. Next year in MFW 1st, there's the intro to orchestra.

Yes, I "count" doctor visits and dentist visits toward "school day time" when they are this young. The people there talk to them about how to do it right and all of that. It's education. I really like how Sarah put it. activities that are "with purpose" and it will vary in different life stages.

some people add in foreign language learning. I think in some books that talk about Charlotte Mason ways, it tends to be scheduled in about 15 minutes for lesson time. See if your library or local store has something like Teach Me Spanish by Judy Mahoney. It's an easy way to introduce foreign language. you put in the CD and listen and sing along and learn a few phrases. That's intro level for the age.

do more nature walks together. take your camera if you're not the drawing stage. Begin to make a chart from your kitchen window -- where does the sun seem to set today? Look again from same spot in one week... does it seem different? (you'll do this slowly over the year and notice a lot of changes!) Is it closer to Miss Debbie's rose bushes, or Miss becky's wood shed today?

Or , hmm... it's lunch time... which way is the shadow on the maple tree out back pointing. Go put a rock at the end of the shadow. (3 hours later.... ask them to find the shadow and find the rock. it will be different. Do it again later. wake up and do it. look for the patterns. draw it. those kinds of things are stuff that I think classroom teachers wish they could.

Don't burn out at this point. that's my heart. ((hug)) Happy Thanksgiving to you.

teeniebeenie6
Posts: 2
Joined: Wed Jan 19, 2011 7:31 am

Re: How to stretch K curriculum when child knows letters/sou

Unread post by teeniebeenie6 » Wed Nov 23, 2011 12:23 pm

Thank you both SO much for your advice. It has helped me look at things differently. I'd forgotten that manners were taught in kindergarten, it has been so long since I was in it, lol. I will definitely start including our manner lessons as part of our schooling. Thank you Cbollin also for the recommendation of "The Etiquette factory." I will definitely look into it. This is such a great community I am glad to be part of it!

Erna
Posts: 66
Joined: Mon Aug 20, 2007 6:48 pm

Re: How to stretch K curriculum when child knows letters/sou

Unread post by Erna » Thu Nov 24, 2011 9:21 am

I haven't read through every response so I hope I am not throwing out a repeat. When we did K with my oldest she knew letter names and sounds. We extended our learning with a lot of lapbooks. It was a lot of fun! I used the K year to let her practice her writing skills but we still briefly reviewed letter sounds to make sure she had them down right.

Now, I have an older K student and we don't do a lot of extras because she has her older sister's ECC program to help fill in some gaps.

I don't have extensive requirements where I live so I didn't have to track things as you do. So, I am not sure how much extra time lapbooks would add to your day. However, they are keepsakes and were a great addition to our homeschooling as it cemented so much! It also acted like time to record narrations. You could precut the pieces or have your child cut them for motor skills.

mlhom4him
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Location: Pacific Northwest
Contact:

Re: How to stretch K curriculum when child knows letters/sou

Unread post by mlhom4him » Mon Dec 12, 2011 12:29 pm

Sorry, no time to read all the responses.

I had my daughter do a unit study with each of the science units. We made "lapbooks" or "folders" for each of the themes. For the S unit we studied things about the sun and some of the other planets. We "studied" Van Gogh a little and colored a "Sunflowers" picture. We read "Katie and the Sunflowers" as well as other books about sunflowers and about Van Gogh that I found in the picture book section of the library.

For the M unit we studied the different phases of the moon. Drew some diagrams of it. Kept an observation of the moon book for a month. We continued our study of Van Gogh by looking at his Stary Night print. We made a matching game of the moon phases.

For the W unit, we checked out the book and the dvd of Magic School Bus and the Water Cycle (or something like that). She dictated her own book of the water cycle and then illustrated it.

For the H unit, we went to a miniature horse farm. Did a folder on the parts of a horse. Talked to the horse trainer about how horses were weaned and then trained.

Hope that gives you some ideas.

Also when I wanted more information I searched on Squiddo for more ideas on lapbooks.

Mary Lou

PS Feel free to email me privately if you need more information.

kewkew34
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MFW K - Already have Reading, Writing, and Math

Unread post by kewkew34 » Sat Sep 15, 2012 10:27 am

HSMom03 wrote:I am planning to wait until August/September to begin and he will be 5-3/4 years old at that point. I just want to make sure that the K program will not be too easy for him (sorry, I'm sure you get that question all the time!). Thanks!
I just wanted to say that I am using the K program with my daughter who is 5 3/4 right now. She has been able to read for a couple of years and we've been doing hands on math for the last few years. I really wanted to make sure to use the K program with her mainly for the Bible/character part of the curriculum. And having the science topic so neatly tied in is great. I am planning on supplementing the math with Singapore Essentials. We only just finished the first unit: Ss sun, and she seems to be enjoying it.
Karen-Wife to Harold for 7 yrs
Mom to
Steven-21 grad of PS, Floyd-19 working on GED, Krystal-16 lives with her dad and in PS
Tabitha-6 started K Aug 2012
Amelia-4 1/2 tagging along in K
Hannah-3 Pre K and Letter of the Week
Harold III- 1

gratitude
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Joined: Mon May 10, 2010 11:50 am

Re: MFW K - Already have Reading, Writing, and Math

Unread post by gratitude » Sun Sep 16, 2012 10:34 am

I am using MFWK right now with my dd who is 5 3/4. She is reading some, and has read some signs, with longer words, while driving out and about. She also knows basic math.

Phonics has as much to do with learning how to spell as learning how to read. MFWK is just the right work load for her each day. I am doing it as written; except for the fact that I am not doing the MFWK math. Instead of MFWK math I am having her do Singapore Earlybird, which she loves. The other thing I am adding is read aloud books.

This is a very personal decision. I prefer an easier / lighter K year for Kindergarten. In our home it increases at age 6, but becomes more serious at age 8.

Carin

dhudson
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Making adjustments to MFWK for an adv early reader

Unread post by dhudson » Tue Nov 05, 2013 11:03 pm

mommyofmany wrote:I'm trying to figure out what to do with my dd for her kindergarten year. I initially had planned to start K with her next summer but she took off with reading and is now reading 2nd grade level books (she is also doing some simple addition, patterns, etc... for math). Her fine motor skills are more "on target" and she isn't yet writing her alphabet. Is it possible to use MFWK with a child that is already reading well? What do you add to it or how do you adjust it? HOD's K program isn't focused on phonics so it seems like it may be easier to "tweak" for her but I've never used MFW so I don't know. Any suggestions? Thanks for your help!
Mine were all reading before K and we did MFWK for several reasons.

1. Emotionally, they were still little and one of our goals was to make sure learning was fun and enjoyable. Now that they are in Junior High and High School that foundation of learning being fun and engaging has held us in good stead.

2. Biblically, MFWK is a wonderful foundation for the rest of the years of MFW.

3. My kids needed the hand coordination practice that MFWK gives and did I mention that it was so much fun?

To make MFWK more challenging you can add more readers. As a matter of fact, the TM gives you ideas in how to make it more challenging. Back when I was teaching mine, I added Abeka readers.
God Bless,
Dawn
http://www.shiningexamples.blogspot.com
blessed Mom of three - 16, 13 & 13
happy user of MFW since 2002

mommyofmany
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Joined: Mon May 30, 2011 1:15 pm

Re: Making adjustments to MFWK for an adv early reader

Unread post by mommyofmany » Wed Nov 06, 2013 3:14 pm

Thanks Dawn for your feedback about MFW K! It's nice to know that the TM has suggestions in it for our situation. I like the idea of starting out slow and letting her mature emotionally before getting into more serious school work. We had barely started working on "The Reading Lesson" and Bob Books and she just starting reading everything in sight. I wasn't going to push early reading with her- I think she just learned how to read all on her own by following along with the words during our reading time together. I didn't know she was paying such close attention, lol! She definitely could use a lot of skill building in the fine motor department and it sounds like MFW K has that built in to it. Thanks again. :)
Blessings,
Emily- mommy to ds(21), dd(18), ds(11), ds(10 w/Down syndrome), dd(7), dd(5), & dd(2).

mothermayi
Posts: 40
Joined: Thu Jun 13, 2013 1:51 pm

Re: Making adjustments to MFWK for an adv early reader

Unread post by mothermayi » Sun Nov 17, 2013 12:45 am

I would recommend MFW K, even though she is reading. It is gentle and fun and more appropriate for her age group. I recommend going thru the phonics in the program if she needs to solidify her phonics. The science and bible are wonderful in MFW K and it sounds like the handwriting will be on target for your dc. The TM gives ideas on how to beef it up for readers but I will say it only gives you a few things to do. I say this to you bc I was led to believe there were a lot of things in the TM if your child is reading but there isn't and I was disappointed bc I expected more. However, there are lots of resources on the fb group to help your dc beef it up.

My oldest dd is 5.5 and she is far beyond the reading, math, and handwriting in MFW K but she is learning so much from the character traits and science that I would hate to see your dc miss it. It is a great year :).
Returning to MFW for 2015!! :-)
ds13 (8th)--MFW EX1850, EG, WWS, PP Guides, TT 2.0 Pre-Algebra
ds11.5 (7th)--MFW EX1850, AOG, WWS, PP Guides, Singapore 5B-6B
dd7 (2nd)--MFW EX1850, LLFT2, Miquon, AAS1
dd5--MFW K

MFW-Lucy

Re: Making adjustments to MFWK for an adv early reader

Unread post by MFW-Lucy » Tue Nov 19, 2013 11:40 am

The Kindergarten archives also have some great information from mom who have used K with reading kids. Here is the general link to the K archives: http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewforum.php?f=1
and here is the link to the topic, "Choosing K - For a child who is already reading, ideas & encouragement": http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=2304.

For kids who have started reading the primary activity they will do for reading is to read to you and independently, continuing to develop confidence and fluency. There are other language arts skills such as beginning spelling, writing, and handwriting that will also be developed through the language arts section of the daily lesson plans, especially after unit 6 once the word list is introduced.

Hope that helps you some too!

mommyofmany
Posts: 7
Joined: Mon May 30, 2011 1:15 pm

Re: Making adjustments to MFWK for an adv early reader

Unread post by mommyofmany » Wed Nov 20, 2013 1:31 pm

Thank you mothermayi!! I think MFWK will be a great in between year for her! I'll have to check out the fb group- thanks for the suggestion. :)

Thanks for the links Lucy!! There's a lot of helpful info in the archive! :)
Blessings,
Emily- mommy to ds(21), dd(18), ds(11), ds(10 w/Down syndrome), dd(7), dd(5), & dd(2).

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