Notebook Pages

Including getting a later start using "English From The Roots Up" or "God & the History of Art"
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Julie in MN
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Notebook Pages

Unread post by Julie in MN » Wed Jan 26, 2011 5:45 pm

Omma wrote:Are we supposed to do history (or science) notebook pages basically every day or just when specifically noted to do so? Right now we are on week 3 of RtR and I only have the kids do notebook pages when specifically noted. I occasionally have the kids narrate back some of what I've read, but this aspect is also new to me. Science notebook pages have been included when it is time to draw a cell, etc. History pages have been done for map work and when the notes specifically say to look up Usborne quicklinks and copy a picture of Julius Caesar (for example), and then I have them write a little blurb about him. Otherwise, we have not been doing any notebook pages and I just wanted to make sure we were doing this correctly.

Thanks. Oh, and we are very much enjoying RtR so far.
Brenda
Hi Brenda,
I am a big notebooking fan, so I often had my ds make a few extra notebook pages as we went along. Often I posted such things in the Ideas forum, if that helps.

But in general, I think the amount that's in the manual is the basic expectation. So just what you said. And you are wise to see that other areas of the curriculum may have writing, besides history.

I also think a good gauge is whether your oldest is about 5th grade for RTR, and if younger/older then you might think about more/less. But that's just my personal take on things.

What a fun idea for engaging the kids in their day's progress. Great prep for the older years!
Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
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TriciaMR
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Re: When to make history notebook entries

Unread post by TriciaMR » Wed Jan 26, 2011 5:52 pm

We just do them as flagged in the TM. I think it is a good amount. Don't worry, I forget to have my dd narrate back sometimes, too, but then 3 days later we'll be discussing something else, and she'll say, "And remember we read about blah and how it ties in this way." Or, I'll remember it, and we'll talk about it again. It's all good.

-Trish
Trish - Wife to Phil, Mom to Toni(18), Charlie(14), and Trent(14)
2014-2015 - AHL, CTG
2015-2016 - WHL, RTR
2016-2017 - EXP1850, US1877
2017-2018 - DE, 1850MOD
2018-2019 - College, AHL
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Omma
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Re: When to make history notebook entries

Unread post by Omma » Thu Jan 27, 2011 7:06 am

Thank you! Also for the reminder to check for specific info week by week. And yes, I do have a ds in 5th grade :) as well as a dd who is in 3rd/4th grade (she has a late Nov. birthday).

My ds LOVES Augustus Caesar's World, BTW, and my dd really enjoyed it, too, until we got to the chapters about blood and war, that is. I know it'll get better for her again, and I'm really pleased with the book selections that MFW has picked out for us to read. Even though we had already studied Rome in the fall (season as well as 'the fall' :-) ), we are all amazed at how fresh and fun our study of Rome is this 2nd time around (now that we are doing it the MFW way with RtR). I am glad that we started with week 1.

Brenda

Julie in MN
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Re: When to make history notebook entries

Unread post by Julie in MN » Thu Jan 27, 2011 8:25 am

That's good to hear, Brenda. It seems like lots of folks around here ask about just that thing -- what if they've already studied Rome. Now you'll be the expert :)

Enjoy!
Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

Julie in MN
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RtR Notebooking pages?

Unread post by Julie in MN » Fri Apr 06, 2012 10:22 am

magnet252829 wrote:Has anyone developed a generic RtR notebooking page? For example maybe a watermark of the graphic on the cover of the manual with writing lines over it; or a stone looking page border with lines on the page.

(I'm a fomer PC MSPublisher user who is having a hard time getting used to making worksheets on my new MacBook, so am looking to see if anyone else has developed a notebooking page before tearing my hair out trying to do so myself.)

Alene
My son would just google a picture of what he was writing about, or I would google a few & he would choose. But he did pretty much all of his typing on the computer. Let me take a peek in my word files for 5th/6th grade:

- Jesus has several lovely pix, from him as a child thru him on the cross, with a paragraph under each
- Julius Caesar has the typical statue, and each line of his text is written in a different font :~
- The Founding of Rome has the statue of the wolf & twins, and a sign he made, "WARNING, WARNING, THIS IS A LEGEND. PROBABLY NOT ALL TRUE."

My son likes to fool around on the computer :)

Oh, and if he used an image on somebody's website, I'd try to put the website address in small print under the picture, to give it credit.

Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

abrightmom
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RTR History

Unread post by abrightmom » Fri Oct 12, 2012 12:36 pm

annaz wrote:Compared to what I'm use to, RTR History is a bit more open-ended in the activity or summarizing than I thought. Which is okay, I guess, sky is the limit. But I'm not used to this. I'm used to a lot more. More doesn't necessarily better or good, but I am looking for a tiny bit more activity/journaling/summarizing, etc that aren't big time wasters. DD has a real hard time with it being open ended. Something that I think is a good thing to work on with her.

Are there websites that would help me perhaps schedule some more notebooking than what is there? Just looking for ideas or websites, more notebook pages if you've used any.
Have you looked at the Activity Guide for Story of the World? You could tie in some encyclopedia readings/outlining/summarizing/written narration work for her and use the SOTW AG as a jumping off point. The SOTW Activity Guide correlates encyclopedia readings to the text and also has activity ideas galore (and maps, coloring sheets, etc.) You can buy the activity pages (maps, coloring sheets, etc.) as a PDF for ease of printing although the guide itself has the questions, book lists, narration prompts, activity ideas/directions so you may want to use both. It may be just what you need. I haven't tried this but have you searched for notebooking pages tying in with Trial and Triumph or How We Got the Bible? I can see someone creating something fun to tie in with those but I haven't searched.
-Katrina-

DS15, DS14, DD12, DS8

cbollin

Re: RTR History

Unread post by cbollin » Fri Oct 12, 2012 12:39 pm

draw and write through history?

anything here?
http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewforum.php?f=27

one of the most simple things for us? copy the pages in ACW mentioned in the manual (they were the start of sections of the book)... when oldest was in 4th, we just colored... when middle was in 6th, she colored too now that I think about it.. but some of them she made an extra copy of the person and wrote a sentence or two about it. just the type of paper blank on top and lines on bottom.
so you might be able to make something from those pages as a starter.

-crystal

Julie in MN
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Re: RTR History

Unread post by Julie in MN » Fri Oct 12, 2012 1:14 pm

annaz wrote: DD has a real hard time with it being open ended. Something that I think is a good thing to work on with her.
I really agree with this.

We never used pre made notebook pages, but instead each of my homeschooled kids took notebooking in the direction of their own interests. My older dd (pre-MFW) did a lot of hand-drawing, calligraphy quotes, etc. My youngest liked to fool around with different fonts and formats on the computer.

I think I sort of used "narration time" to help them think through what they had learned, maybe taking notes for them on the marker board or having them actually work on their pages as we went (so they wouldn't forget their ideas). Sometimes this kind of conversation would help me realize they had missed the big picture or an important point. I treated it like class discussion, with me as the classmates. My children found it difficult to think of ideas on their own, at least until we'd been doing this a while.

I forget what age(s) you are working with, but if you have an older child who won't be doing 1850MOD, you could also incorporate some outlining like you would be doing during that year. Or if you won't be doing an advanced ECC, then maybe nab some of the country report ideas, current events (I think that was already mentioned), or advanced missionary bios with some kind of daily summary or notebook page? And in general, once my kids were in about 6th or 7th grade, I just let them know that they'd be doing some kind of writing or summarizing every day, so they started to think ahead a little bit. Sometimes it was a science experiment summary or "what I learned in co-op today."

Just a couple more ideas,
Julie
P.S. Some ideas from our year in RTR:
http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php ... 392#p34392
http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php ... 390#p34390
http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php ... 414#p28414
http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php ... 129#p28129
http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php ... 126#p28126
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

annaz
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Re: RTR History

Unread post by annaz » Fri Oct 12, 2012 1:43 pm

cbollin wrote:draw and write through history?

anything here?
http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewforum.php?f=27
We used DWTH last year as we're repeating Rome (sigh), but it's different, so we're doing it anyway. But this will be used for the second half of RTR since I have the one that covers that era too. :-)

Thanks for the archive reminder. I ALWAYS forget about it!
abrightmom wrote:Have you looked at the Activity Guide for Story of the World? You could tie in some encyclopedia readings/outlining/summarizing/written narration work for her and use the SOTW AG as a jumping off point. The SOTW Activity Guide correlates encyclopedia readings to the text and also has activity ideas galore (and maps, coloring sheets, etc.) You can buy the activity pages (maps, coloring sheets, etc.) as a PDF for ease of printing although the guide itself has the questions, book lists, narration prompts, activity ideas/directions so you may want to use both. It may be just what you need. I haven't tried this but have you searched for notebooking pages tying in with Trial and Triumph or How We Got the Bible? I can see someone creating something fun to tie in with those but I haven't searched.
This is a great idea. I didn't think about it as we haven't gotten to the book yet!
Julie in MN wrote:We never used pre made notebook pages, but instead each of my homeschooled kids took notebooking in the direction of their own interests. My older dd (pre-MFW) did a lot of hand-drawing, calligraphy quotes, etc. My youngest liked to fool around with different fonts and formats on the computer.

I think I sort of used "narration time" to help them think through what they had learned, maybe taking notes for them on the marker board or having them actually work on their pages as we went (so they wouldn't forget their ideas). Sometimes this kind of conversation would help me realize they had missed the big picture or an important point. I treated it like class discussion, with me as the classmates. My children found it difficult to think of ideas on their own, at least until we'd been doing this a while.

I forget what age(s) you are working with, but if you have an older child who won't be doing 1850MOD, you could also incorporate some outlining like you would be doing during that year. Or if you won't be doing an advanced ECC, then maybe nab some of the country report ideas, current events (I think that was already mentioned), or advanced missionary bios with some kind of daily summary or notebook page? And in general, once my kids were in about 6th or 7th grade, I just let them know that they'd be doing some kind of writing or summarizing every day, so they started to think ahead a little bit
we are doing this already and outlining. I think once I get some ideas flowing, I'll give dd an "Idea List". We are already doing outlining and reports are a good thing. I just need to give her baby steps with this, starting with simple "research".

Julie in MN
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Extra Notebooking Pages

Unread post by Julie in MN » Wed Nov 28, 2012 11:31 pm

raisingupboys wrote:I have a 5th grader and an 8th grader. I am wishing that there was a notebooking page for each day's reading, so that we have a summary of the main events. We are having to flip back through the teacher's manual to try and find when and where we read about people and events. It would be nice to have a more convenient way to go back to refresh our memory. The timeline is so scant with no main events written with those either.

Has anyone put together something to go along with each day for Rome to the Reformation? I guess I could give them a blank sheet of paper to take notes, but it would be nice if there was something more put together than that. We did [another program] last year and MFW is much richer than MOH. I love that much of our reading is straight from the Bible and that the books in the deluxe package are scheduled in. I guess I just must not be geared toward a Charlotte Mason approach. I like a little more structure, and concrete ways of assessing retention.
Hmmm, I know we did extra pages but I'd have to hunt around to find out which were assigned and which were extras. I know I occasionally had him notebook about an artist in GHA (as well as the assigned composers), or I'd make a Venn diagram once or twice a year to compare two things. I also allowed him to create his own page instead of other assignments, such as coloring pages, if he preferred.

Sometimes I post our extras on the ideas board, but this is all I could find in RTR:
http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php ... 392#p34392
http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php ... 262#p35262
http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php ... 129#p28129

I took a peek into my son's "5th grade Word files" and found only about a dozen notebook pages that year, but it looks like I assigned more in 6th grade. However, in 5th, I see I also had my son also do notebook pages on field trips and/or what he learned at co-op (opposite weeks).

I also had him do some notebooking pages on science experiments, and he wrote lots of letters (okay that's not notebooking, but it's fun to look back through!).

My thinking is that notebooking is "creating your own book" and it's meant to reflect the user. With my family, pre-made pages tend to make it feel more like filling in workbooks. My kids' notebooking styles were very different from each other.

As for how to help with recall, I think we used the narration to work out what was important, check my kids' understanding of the main points, etc. It wasn't a quick-n-easy process at my house, because we often were analyzing each other's points of view and weighing the importance of different ideas. And I don't pretend my particular kids remember everything, even then. But the notebooks are always there to review.

Just one family's style,
Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

MelissaB
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Re: Extra Notebooking Pages

Unread post by MelissaB » Thu Dec 06, 2012 9:16 pm

I'm not sure whether worksheets guarantee they'll remember the facts, but I like worksheets, too.:)

We use the Medieval World and Ancient World resources at the usborne quicklinks sites to download pictures, move them over to a document, add about 8 lines underneath, then print it out for our girls to write a brief essay about that person or event they've learned about that day. It doesn't take very long. {If you aren't impressed with usborne's pics, you can always google "___________ pic" for photos/images.}

How much they help, I'm not sure... But it's still nice to have another worksheet-appreciating Momma on board. :-)
Melissa B. (Arkansas)
Girls ages 16 & 13
Completed K, 1st, and Investigate {ECC; CTG; RTR; Expl.-1850; and 1850-Mod. Times}
"That they may teach the young women to be sober, to love their husbands, to love their children,.." Titus 2:4

baileymom
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Re: Extra Notebooking Pages

Unread post by baileymom » Fri Dec 07, 2012 9:52 pm

hi! raisingupboys (me too) :)

... have you considered using the Activity Book that goes along with SOTW 2 that you're already using with RtR? it has tons of coloring/activity pages to go along with each chapter, and examples for narrations/or comprehension questions for each section (very helpful for me). i used both it and the notebook pages in the back of our RtR teacher's manual. ... there is also a test booklet for SOTW 2, if you really do want to test.
Kathi - graduated 1, homeschooling 6, preschooling 2, growing 1

TriciaMR
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Writing summaries/narrations with varied ages/levels

Unread post by TriciaMR » Mon Jan 12, 2015 3:45 pm

abrightmom wrote:We are using RTR (just wrapped up week 6 and will do week 7 this week :-) ). We have moved slowly through the first several weeks but we are finding our groove now.

There is ONE difficulty and I want to ask for some advice from "been there, done that" Moms. The notebook assignments that ask us to complete an open ended page are proving difficult for me to assign. I need to develop some sort of criteria or direction to guide my kids who are at wildly different levels in ability. My oldest son should be asked to write more but as we haven't done this sort of work before I don't know how to guide him. My youngest basically needs me to write down 3-4 sentences for her to copy and my middle son is somewhere between the two. It is too open ended to tell them to make a page about Caesar Augustus and use the books we've been using.

How do you set requirements for your students of different levels? Any tips to help older students pull the information together on a page without the assignment taking too long?

I want to post an addendum. My kids aren't fabulous oral narrators. Asking for narrations in the group is daunting me. It's hard to measure how each child is doing when they're narrating within a group setting. I'm not sure how to go about it but I think I will begin to require more oral narrating of them this week and see what kind of results I get. There are also a few tidbits within the archives on writing summaries and I'm mining what I am able to from there.
You might checkout the website simplycharlottemason dot com for ideas on narration and how to do it with multiple children.
Trish - Wife to Phil, Mom to Toni(18), Charlie(14), and Trent(14)
2014-2015 - AHL, CTG
2015-2016 - WHL, RTR
2016-2017 - EXP1850, US1877
2017-2018 - DE, 1850MOD
2018-2019 - College, AHL
My blog

Julie in MN
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Re: Writing summaries/narrations with varied ages/levels

Unread post by Julie in MN » Mon Jan 12, 2015 8:08 pm

I agree with Trish that Charlotte Mason is the go-to resource for narration. I always went there when I needed a boost in that department. Narration doesn't come naturally to most of us because we weren't taught that way, but I believe it is a method that builds true learning rather than find-the-answer-and-forget.

Each student will have his own strengths and weaknesses, and I think it's good to expect that. One of my kids took forever and was very detailed; the other was speedy and threw in his own facts at times; the third was a different egg as well. A general guide for age 12 might be to have him write a paragraph every day, adding to a previous topic if there is no new assignment. The other half of that for age 12 might be working with mom on editing every day or week. Building writing endurance and learning to edit are more important to me than getting every detail on paper. In fact, I've seen kid history notebooks that mostly focused on one thing (such as weapons or fashions) and there was a lot of meat in there.

One method I've used as my son got into upper elementary was the marker board. We might go through the life of a historical figure and put random words and thoughts on the board and then try to flesh them out (orally or using the books). In a few cases I had him take notes (such as the longer Augustus Caesar book, which is a rare situation) -- I would flip through chapters after we finished the book, read aloud the chapter titles or headings, and ask him for things he remembered (helping when necessary), which he would write down as "planning notes" before he notebooked. Also, my son typed and found things online like illustrations and graphs and such, which beefed up his pages.

Since my son's notebook pages were typed, it's easy for me to share them if it would motivate your oldest to see another example? It may be more work to drag our kids through narration and notebooking, but I think it has a lot of long-term value so it's worth setting aside a bit of time each week, if you can. But I may be biased, as writing/effective communication is a big deal at my house.

Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

Julie in MN
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Re: Writing summaries/narrations with varied ages/levels

Unread post by Julie in MN » Tue Jan 13, 2015 1:57 pm

abrightmom wrote:Your suggestions are excellent. The difficulty? TIME. That kind of teaching is the BEST but it takes more time each week than I am able to give each student. No two kids here work at the same level and there are a lot of needs in numerous categories .... My oldest needs so much hand holding and structure. And, if I don't limit or structure his time and assignment requirements he hits one of two extremes: he either doesn't do the work (hits the lowest mark) OR he takes so long that it derails the school day.

Writing is a high priority and we are failing. This is causing loss of sleep for me as I am pondering what can and should be done. My deepest desires for my kiddos don't always mesh with reality .... Maybe note booking is too open ended for what time and skill level restraints we have.

Praying a lot today over the writing and history note booking questions. :-)
Hi Katrina,
<hugs> on a discouraging day.

When I get overwhelmed, I try to remember to do less and do it well, and let go of the rest. Can you begin with something small?

For example, kind of like the 1st grade Bible notebook begins with one (large) line for writing, can you have your older son begin with one good sentence (or writing one new fact) each day, and you begin with one 15-minute feedback/editing session on Friday, discussing his facts, having a book open on your lap to prompt him if needed? He could do any needed corrections on the weekend or evenings, which can be a motivating factor to do it well the first time. Then once it has been going well for say a month, you could raise the bar a bit, say to two sentences daily, still with a 15-minute parent editing session set in stone each week. Meanwhile, you could work on oral narration as a family, which prepares him to have something to write.

Or, begin with group review and narration on the marker board, sort-of modeling ways to summarize as you talk through different ideas. There are other ways to begin small, I'm just throwing out random ideas.

Also, can you limit the time your student is allowed during your school day. After a reasonable amount of time, I usually took away the assignment and moved on. The assignment would be completed in the evening, without as much help from me since it was past school hours.

Most of all, you need rest. Everyone will benefit from you taking care of yourself. I am a big fan of setting school hours and non-school hours so you all get a break, but whatever you need to do, let go and just do what you can each day and it will be far more than it might have been without you there. I'm not saying that because I've never beat myself up over my teaching inadequacies, but because that's what I see while looking back. Sadly, my kids (and most other kids I know) don't remember all that many details about what they learned over the years. Sometimes I think that I simply educated myself, becoming an educated parent who could enrich my children's lives. For the rest, God uses each day in surprising ways; we don't have to do it all.

What kids do remember tends to be more about how to figure something out, how to keep going until you get it right, how to turn to prayer, things like that, and it sounds like you are doing well at teaching those lessons!

There are a lot of threads in the "Other Subjects Archive" that start with the word "Encouragement," because you are not alone in your worries. For instance, here's one about not fitting it all in: http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=2673

More hugs to you, and apologies if my posts don't make as much sense as I hoped, since I have a LOT of thoughts about such things these days LOL :)
Julie
P.S. I'm not sure what grades you have, but MFW has added an additional writing component to 7-8th grades (Writing With Skill). I wonder if that would be helpful to you?
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

abrightmom
Posts: 56
Joined: Sun Apr 10, 2011 7:17 pm

Re: Writing summaries/narrations with varied ages/levels

Unread post by abrightmom » Tue Jan 13, 2015 3:56 pm

Julie,

For years I've gleaned from your "older and wiser woman" wisdom grounded in God's Word. Thanks for being faithful ....

The ideas you've thrown out make sense.
1. Write 1-2 facts from each day's reading. Pull it together at week's end.
2. Group review on white board. **We did this and it ended up being ME writing a summary and they copied. I felt huffy at this approach because my oldest got away with something ;) (not thinking on his own .... ). Then, out of frustration I skipped the open ended note booking page about Julius Caesar because I wasn't sure what to do.
3. Limit time spent on note booking.
4. Set school hours. **We're doing this and I've scaled back a lot this school year. DH and I feel that our oldest is still not working to potential or at a reasonable level but it is getting better. I've given us grace as we have been working with the Family Cycle paradigm for the first time and it's not intuitive for ME to give appropriate assignments or set appropriate standards for differing ages/abilities ..... I'm not SURE how it's really working for us. Oldest seems under challenged while my 8yo is struggling to keep up. :) I'm working to solve problems right now and see if we can have a better run with Week 7; the content is fantastic and *I* love the books. Either way, it's not been as easy as I hoped it would be.

I adore Writing with Skill; bought it and set up a notebook for my son. Have yet to commit to a writing program. It's been all I could do to launch RTR and keep up with math, character issues (we have had a HARD year with tween hormones here plus some health challenges), etc. It's getting better, by God's grace, and the writing program decision is on the table. Writing Strands 4, Cover Story or start WWS now .... jury is still out. :-)

ETA: We are 6th, 4th, 3rd and K.
-Katrina-

DS15, DS14, DD12, DS8

Julie in MN
Posts: 2927
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Location: Minnesota

Re: Writing summaries/narrations with varied ages/levels

Unread post by Julie in MN » Thu Jan 15, 2015 1:44 am

Yes, yes, you have made some sense of my meandering thoughts. I hope one of those things helps out, or is a springboard to something that works for you.

And 6th grade, you have time to wait on WWS, or to start it very, very slowly.

Here's to His mercies being new each morning.
Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

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