Independent Work for children with RTR?

Including getting a later start using "English From The Roots Up" or "God & the History of Art"
Post Reply
Julie in MN
Posts: 2928
Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 3:44 pm
Location: Minnesota

Independent Work for children with RTR?

Unread post by Julie in MN » Thu Jun 07, 2007 9:27 am

purpletanya wrote:I have 7 children in my home - 4 under the age of 4! We will be using RTR this next school year. We have used MFW for the past two years. I have a 5th & 7th grader who will be using this program. They are very independent learners. I will miss doing the reading with them but realistically know that I just can't with all my little ones. My question is: How do I check their knowledge base and know that they are truly grasping what they should be learning from the program??? I know that they will do the readings just how do I check it?

Blessings
Tanya
Hi Tanya,
I have been in a position this year where my ds has had to do more of RTR on his own than I would like. (My husband has been in the hospital of-and-on all year.) However, I have been reluctant to have my son learn the early Christian history on his own. So my solution has been keeping up on all the basics (math, reading, English, writing, Spanish, & some extras in co-op), and we are spreading out the things that connect to RTR (Latin roots, history, Bible, art, read-alouds) and the science over more than one year. The MFW grid helps me see where I am at on both the basics and the RTR. I basically add in pages between the "weeks" in the teacher manual. Since RTR covers two complete science programs and tons of topics that can be expanded upon, I have still felt ds received a solid 5th grade education. There are tons of videos and library books in the book basket lists that our whole family has enjoyed this year.

However, if I were to try to have him do it all independently, and all in one year, I think that the notebooking would provide a good means of evaluating his learning. You might even add notebooking pages, and use them instead of some of the writing in their language arts program.

Conversation (& narration) is also an excellent benefit that homeschooling provides! At the top of the grid each day you will see the topic of the day. You can open up a conversation by asking, "What did you learn about _____ today?" This is a good skill for students to develop.

As for science, every week they will study a different system of the body during the first half of the year. They will notebook those first few weeks, and then build models. It should be easy to ask them to explain what they have built.

I think it would be ideal if you all did Bible together in the evening. But if you are unable to do this on a regular basis, I would strongly encourage you to at least be involved in new topics, such as when they start reading Trial and Triumph near the middle of the year. The first stories especially are of early Christian martyrs and may benefit from parental guidance. And my son needed some guidance through the Book of Revelations readings.

Well, some long-winded thoughts there as we wrap up our year here :o)
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

Julie in MN
Posts: 2928
Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 3:44 pm
Location: Minnesota

If you have 6th-8th graders in RTR...

Unread post by Julie in MN » Wed Jan 07, 2009 4:26 pm

NCMom wrote:If you have 6th-8th graders in RTR... do you read aloud everything or do they do the reading independently? The reason I'm asking is that we're wrapping up CTG and I'm getting ready to order RTR. I'll be teaching 8th, 6th, 3rd, 2nd, and K with a toddler and baby in the mix. I have done most of the reading this year out loud but was thinking if the older children could read independently, it would free me up to spend time with the little ones. Just seeing if this worked for anyone else or if you have any other suggestions for my situation.
Thanks,
Nancy C
Hi Nancy,
I have a 7th grader (just finishing up EX1850). We do the history & Bible reading together. That's just the way he learns best, and it's my preference to participate in this learning. Because he's my youngest, I'm not in a hurry to let go, either :o)

Here are some things that work well on his own in 7th grade:

- science/labs
- Progeny Press (this could include two of the read-alouds at this age)
- a lot of his math

Another thing that helps cut down on your daily reading is doing Bible as a family in the evening. Also read-alouds at bedtime.

Just a couple of ideas to start with.
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

cbollin

Unread post by cbollin » Wed Jan 07, 2009 7:59 pm

Nancy,

I'm not in RTR this year, but I have a 7th grader. And it works with us that way to let her read ahead on her own in some things (like read alouds) so I can work with my 4th grader a bit more on understanding the stories. If we didn't, then I'd end up pacing it toward the older girl and the middle one would be missing out.

(edit to clarify: the 7th grader just reads the chapter ahead of time. she is still included in the discussion time and listening time. Then after 4th grader's mind has wandered off, oldest and mom/dad can talk more.)


-crystal
Last edited by cbollin on Wed Jan 14, 2009 10:42 am, edited 1 time in total.

niki
Posts: 128
Joined: Thu Dec 21, 2006 10:00 am

Unread post by niki » Wed Jan 07, 2009 8:44 pm

I started this year with my 3rd and 4th graders to have them read some of the history on their own. Usually it's the Usborne books. Once they read they do a notebook page or narrate to me what they read. It seems to be working nicely, and like you said, it gives me extra time with my 1st grader who really needs every bit of me for her schooling.
Niki

Strong Tower Academy
EX1850
DD 6th DS 5th DD 3rd

HSmommi2mine
Posts: 159
Joined: Mon Oct 23, 2006 5:59 pm

Unread post by HSmommi2mine » Wed Jan 07, 2009 9:11 pm

Anything I am not reading to the younger kids my 6th grader reads on his own. It works very well for me and he learns best that way anyhow.
~Christina

Wife to my favorite guy
Mom to 3 great kids

tiffany
Posts: 160
Joined: Thu Mar 10, 2005 9:56 am

Unread post by tiffany » Thu Jan 08, 2009 12:54 pm

I hadn't planned to have them do as much reading alone as they are this year, but with my 1 1/2 year old, my 2nd grader(finishing up MFW 1), and my Kindergartner- I didn't feel I had a choice. My 4th grader, who does not enjoy reading much, had minded the most.

I miss it myself, because I like learning all that history stuff- One of the benefits of homeschooling I think.

I had already bought the Story of the World cds. So they do use those, when that is scheduled. Their Dad is doing the Astronomy readings with them at night right now, and we make an effort to read Trial and Triumph together. The kids would really like to go back to reading the bible together, which I'm hoping to do in the evening soon.

[ Editor's Note: More here http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php?t=3047#p51954 ]
Tiffany
Wife to Tim ('88)
Mother to Sophie 16, Jonathan 14, Joey 12, Noah 10, Matthew 8, Eli 4
Have completed MFWK, MFW 1st grade, ECC, CTG, RTR, Exp.-1850,1850-Mod., HS Ancients, HS World
Fall of '11 ECC,HS Ancients, HS U.S. History to 1877

4Truth
Posts: 332
Joined: Fri Dec 17, 2004 11:59 am

Unread post by 4Truth » Thu Jan 08, 2009 4:20 pm

It depends on the book. Like Crystal, my 7th grader often reads ahead on her own. But sometimes I insist on reading certain books aloud so that I can edit as we go, like we did with Augustus Caesar's World. I'm thankful for Marie's notes in the TM that give me a heads-up on things like that, so watch for those notes if you do turn it over to your olders to work independently.

Also, with some books we all take turns reading aloud. 7th grader is a strong reader and so that gives me a break. 4th grader's not a stronger reader, but she needs the practice. Her sister tends to get annoyed with her mistakes, but I remind her that it's a good lesson in patience and helpfulness.

With my youngest girl, I have to work 1-on-1 with her either first thing in the morning before I get started with the others, or later on when we're done with group work. Although she's getting to the point now where she can sit at the table and do some things while the others are doing independent 3 R's, so that's helpful. During group time, she really loves to be involved and is *deeply* offended if she gets the impression that she's being left out. LOL. So she has her own 3-ring notebook, too. Even as a 3yo when we first started MFW, I would give her a 1" binder and let her do stickers and coloring pages so that she felt "involved".
Donna, with two MFW graduates and the "baby" in 9th grade! %| Using MFW since 2004.

MFW-Lucy

Unread post by MFW-Lucy » Wed Jan 14, 2009 10:18 am

Dear Ladies,

There are circumstances in the life of our individual families that sometimes necessitate that older kids do some reading on their own. With MFW this would be considered the exception. Reading the books with your kids in the program is an important aspect of the program. This gives time to discuss and have input into what is being taught and to help your kids to process what is being taught. This is an important part of the learning process. All children in grades 2nd -8th listen to most books together. The exception is in year 5 for history, but the history presented will be better understood if processed with you. Remember the next time your students study this material it will be on an independent level.

Narration is important in helping retention, checking for understanding and helps with the writing process, since it is really an oral composition. Having your students take this step before writing a summary will help you to clarify what they remember and what key points you may need to gently highlight for him. Books that are are used for narration and summaries vary each year. The Teacher's Manual for each year will refer you to which books are recommended for narration and will explain this process, along with notebook pages.

In the weekly notes Marie gives you, often she will give you help in knowing when a subject will be in a days reading that you need to be sensitive to. These notes help you to navigate how to help your kids to process through different information from a Christian perspective.

Nancy, for your situation, I would suggest your 8th grader, who will be doing his science independently, help you with your K and toddler while you teach science to the other kids (your K child may enjoy looking at and listening to the science books). I would also suggest having your 2 older kids help you when needed to watch toddler for 20 to 30 minutes a day, while you teach your K child. If you are having a hard time getting it all in Dad could possibly help with read alouds and Bible at night. If you need some other ideas give the office a call.

Please ask questions if something is not clear.

Lucy

MFW-Lucy

Unread post by MFW-Lucy » Wed Jan 14, 2009 5:15 pm

Dear Ladies,

A dear board friend sent me an e-mail to let me know that my post may not have communicated clearly. When I mention that books are to be read to students in the programs this would refer to books primarily in Bible, history, science, and if you have the deluxe items those books as well. Book basket is primarily to be done independently by 2nd-8th graders. Other independent reading is done during the reading slot. This would include 7th and 8th grade Progeny Press studies as well as the 7th /8th grade readers in ECC. 7th and 8th graders are also learning to read and study their own science too. So, to clarify there is independent reading done by students in the program that increases as students get older. Refer to the Teachers Manual regarding specific books in each program.

My friend also mentioned that some of you may still have the discussion and narration time with kids after they have read the material. There is freedom to work with the curriculum the way that is best in your family. Maybe your older kids are reading it to themselves, you read it aloud to the younger kids and then you discuss it. That can work. The main idea is that the kids have the opportunity to narrate back the main points as well as discuss any questions and that you have input into the ideas and topics they are learning about.

I hope this has cleared it up. Please ask if you have any questions.
Lucy

4Truth
Posts: 332
Joined: Fri Dec 17, 2004 11:59 am

Unread post by 4Truth » Wed Jan 14, 2009 6:12 pm

Lucy Robertson wrote:There is freedom to work with the curriculum the way that is best in your family. Maybe your older kids are reading it to themselves, you read it aloud to the younger kids and then you discuss it. That can work. The main idea is that the kids have the opportunity to narrate back the main points as well as discuss any questions and that you have input into the ideas and topics they are learning about.
You can also get creative and have some of the older ones do something for their notebooks in lieu of oral narrations on some of the Book Basket stuff. This can be in the form of illustrations, posters, newspaper ads, additional research on particular topics that catch their interest, formal "book reports", written summaries, etc. This certainly isn't necessary, but is something we've done from time to time. I have one who really likes to keep her hands busy, so this is just one more way to fulfill that desire.

Again, not necessary... just some more ideas.
Donna, with two MFW graduates and the "baby" in 9th grade! %| Using MFW since 2004.

NCMom
Posts: 1
Joined: Sun Jun 08, 2008 4:15 pm

Some great ideas!

Unread post by NCMom » Thu Jan 15, 2009 5:45 am

Thank you all so much for the great ideas. Lucy, I appreciate your clarification. I believe that narration is the key- whether I read aloud or they read and then come to me and narrate. I took some time over the Christmas break to read some of Charlotte Mason's 5 vol. set and in her last book she seemed to indicate that those who could read and understand the material should do so independently and then narrate back. And that each lesson should be narrated. Anyway, that is what led me to ask the question and see if others had successfully allowed older kids to be more independent.

We're really looking forward to moving into RTR!!

Nancy C

MFW-Lucy

Unread post by MFW-Lucy » Thu Jan 15, 2009 9:25 am

NCMom wrote:Anyway, that is what led me to ask the question and see if others had successfully allowed older kids to be more independent.]
Hi Nancy,

This was a great question and one that I think lots of families with older kids think about. We see our kids changing and begin to notice their readiness to be independent.

MFW would agree with Charlotte Mason, that as kids get older they can and should be moving toward more independent learning. We call this stage of learning, "Learning by Reading". By 7th and 8th grade bible, history and deluxe items are still being directly taught and other subjects begin to be more parent guided independence. I say parent guided since there still needs to be coaching in how to study, checking of work and some discussion. Some kids will need more instructions than others as they move toward greater independence. Certain subjects such as spelling and writing will likely still need to be directly taught.

We also want to keep the family together as long as possible. We even suggest that when students move on to high school that if possible they still join the family for the family bible time.

We also realize that 7th and 8th graders may have a personal devotion time as well. This is a good time if students have not done that before to consider helping them begin a daily personal devotional time. This again will vary with each family.

7th and 8th graders are definitely moving toward a different level of processing information and many are able to read and synthesis more information on their own. Again you have a lot of freedom to work this out in your home in the way that works best for you and your kids.


Lucy

Julie in MN
Posts: 2928
Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 3:44 pm
Location: Minnesota

Rome to Reformation

Unread post by Julie in MN » Wed Mar 31, 2010 3:51 pm

LynnH wrote:Which books did you read with your children and which did they read on their own?
Thanks,
Lynn
My son was around 5th grade. We did all of the RTR assignments together except the Usborne book for science. We had great discussions about the time of Jesus and all the world happenings in the following years.

My son read independently during book basket (which is really part of history enrichment) and of course his literature reading each day.

Neither of us "read" SOTW, since I splurged on the audios :)
Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

Mommyto3boys
Posts: 32
Joined: Tue Mar 21, 2006 12:24 pm

Re: Rome to Reformation

Unread post by Mommyto3boys » Wed Mar 31, 2010 9:15 pm

I read it all to my dc. I have a 5th and a 2nd grader in RTR along with a K student who often tags along when he likes. They read for book basket as well as their reading time.

Debbie in NC
Mom to 3 ds (11, 8, and 5) and 1 dd (3)

cbollin

Re: Rome to Reformation

Unread post by cbollin » Thu Apr 01, 2010 7:50 am

LynnH wrote:Thanks for your replies! IWe are doing ECC right now and sometimes I will read before she does or after she does as time will allow and then we discuss or she will summarize orally or in written form. My toddler is very busy and into everything and he will only stay occupied for so long. Some days are better than others. But I can say that God has guided us and we have accomplished alot even with a very busy almost 2 year old. Thanks again for your input.
Blessings,
Lynn
Once upon a time, I had a very busy autistic toddler... who became a very busy preschooler who became a very busy trying to climb over the 6 foot privacy fence yesterday....) so... Here are some thing I've done while using MFW for almost her entire life (she's 8. I"ve used MFW for 7 years)

*Put her in a swing (outside) while reading to other kids and then come back inside later to do seat work from that stuff
*put her in front of the Wiggles or Yo Gabba Gabba for 25 minutes and read out loud to others. (yes, I use the TV as a tool sometimes.)
*put her in front of food for 10 minutes while reading something else.
*wait until evening and let dh help by either playing with that wild child, or let him do the deluxe read alouds.
*and and and.... don't faint here... we did some reading in waiting rooms while autistic wild child was in speech therapy or group classes.

nap? what's a nap with her even back then......

-crystal

Pylegang
Posts: 41
Joined: Fri Mar 20, 2009 4:45 pm
Location: Virginia
Contact:

Re: Rome to Reformation

Unread post by Pylegang » Thu Apr 01, 2010 3:18 pm

I'm currently using Rome to the Reformation with my 4th & 2nd grade boys. I read everything aloud, except "The Usborne Book of the Medieval World." I usually sit between my kids and when we get to that book, they take turns reading the little sections aloud.

It is difficult to school with a little one. I remember!! If your older child is able to read other things on her own, then that should be fine. You could do what Julie did -- splurge for the SOTW audio CD's. Then your older could listen to the audio while you tended to your toddler.

Good luck!
--Angela
Homeschooling classically since 2000--DS grade 6 and DS grade 4.


LynnH
Posts: 10
Joined: Tue Jul 06, 2004 7:19 am

Re: Rome to Reformation

Unread post by LynnH » Fri Apr 02, 2010 5:42 pm

Thanks Crystal, I am learning to get creative with my toddler and change things around for him. It keeps him happy and occupied. He has learned to say "school" without the "sch" and uses markers and paper for a bit everyday in the highchair. We have a screen enclosed patio and we let him play out in that for awhile as well, he loves the outdoors! And yes we do throw in tv time when he tires of all this other stuff. Thanks for your reply and tips!

Angela, I am definitely considering the audio for Story of the World - I think it would be nice to have something a little different. I don't mind her reading independently but I also don't want to get in the habit of not reading myself because then I am "out of the loop" on what she is taking in and learning. I know as my toddler grows we will hopefully be able to read together more without interruptions but I am probably living in a fantasy world:)
Thanks for your reply!
Lynn
Lynn H. in Louisiana
DD12 - used MFW K, 1st, Adv, ECC, Exp-1850
DS5 - MFW K

TriciaMR
Posts: 1001
Joined: Thu Sep 20, 2007 11:43 am

RTR with a 6th--working toward Independence?

Unread post by TriciaMR » Wed Jul 21, 2010 8:42 am

rxmom wrote:This year I have a 6th grader (ds 11yo, 12 in Nov.), a 4th grader (ds 9yo), and a 1st grader (dd 7yo in Dec)...we will be doing our RTR year in September. I have struggled somewhat with getting my oldest more independent in completing his assignments... He is a daydreamer, easily distracted, often not finishing work on time. He is a great kid but still LOVES to have mom sitting right next to him when working on school, although this often leads to interruptions when I am teaching the other two and actually distracts him (11y.o) from his work. We are working on this as a character/"consideration for others" issue but we still have a ways to go. I think I have 2 issues I'm struggling with:

1. How to work toward independence....any specific suggestions appreciated. I now have a 1st grader to add to the mix and have less time. He still does lots of dictation to me...does NOT like writing--the mechanical part...he's actually good at writing (creative part). We will be starting a keyboarding program in the fall.
2. How do you "prevent" or deal with interruptions when you are having 1:1 time with other children. I know this is in the discipline realm...

Lastly, just a big thanks to all of you...over the last 3 years you all have been a blessing and a wonderful support group as we have journeyed thru this season of life...
Thanks,
Delcey
One thing that helped for us, we did Bible, History and Science together first. That way, if there were notebook pages, copywork, etc, my oldest would have work to do independently. That might mean that she would dictate to me for her notebook page and I would write it for her to copy during seatwork time, but that way she had something to do. I gathered up all her "seatwork" and put it in an expandable folder. Then, she would work on things (last year - CTG - that was Awana verses, Vocabulary, notebook pages, math drill, sometimes math, probably other things that I can't think of) by herself while I worked with my twins. If she got "stuck" she would go on to something else in her folder. She would let me know she had a question, and if I had a break in working with my boys, I could go give her a little boost. But, it took a couple of weeks of me telling her, "Please go on to the next thing, and we'll come back to that when I'm done with the boys." before she finally stopped interrupting every time she had a question.

We'll be doing RTR this year, and she'll be 5th grade. Like your son, she has writing issues. For the past 2 years we've been gradually working on typing (using something called Dance Mat Typing - free, online), so I'm hoping that soon she'll be ready to do more of her assignments on the computer. I'm thinking of doing Bible, History and Science first (and vocabulary). That way she'll have copywork, notebook pages, science pages, math drill, Awana verses, and vocabulary to work on while I'm doing MFW 1st with my boys. I have also let her do cross stitching, sewing, and other handicrafts if she finished everything before I was done with my boys. Oh yeah, book basket. Book basket is always part of her independent work. She loves reading, so that's not a problem - but it is last on the list.

-Trish
Trish - Wife to Phil, Mom to Toni(18), Charlie(14), and Trent(14)
2014-2015 - AHL, CTG
2015-2016 - WHL, RTR
2016-2017 - EXP1850, US1877
2017-2018 - DE, 1850MOD
2018-2019 - College, AHL
My blog

LSH in MS
Posts: 208
Joined: Sat Feb 19, 2005 9:26 am

Re: RTR with a 6th--working toward Independence?

Unread post by LSH in MS » Tue Jul 27, 2010 8:53 am

Susan Wise Bauer has a wonderful audio lecture entitled 'Teaching Students to Work Independently" You can find it on her website that sells her books. She gives the stages of independence and how to systematically work toward each one. The first stage is complete dependence called "parent at elbow" and the last stage for high school is "Check with students once a week". Very practical advice which will help them to be ready for MFW high school.
Lori

wife to Clifford, mother to ds (17), ds (16), ds (15, ds (13), ds (8), and ds (3)
MFW user for 10 years

Julie in MN
Posts: 2928
Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 3:44 pm
Location: Minnesota

Re: RTR with a 6th--working toward Independence?

Unread post by Julie in MN » Tue Jul 27, 2010 9:40 am

David Hazell also has a convention CD about developing independence that I find interesting. He talks about starting in preschool. And he talks about how it starts with working *together* before they work on their own. Sounds very similar.

I do think that it's important not to ask them to do ANYthing on their own that you haven't already done together. Even if it's "almost the same" as something you've done together, you still need to do it together first, IMO, in order to have success at independence.

As for independence with a child who doesn't like to read or write, I think it's hard. Ideally, I like to do as much as possible together. I think of it like ancient schools where everything was done orally. So I try to commit "school hours" to teaching, in whatever way is necessary. Typing has worked well for us, marker boards seem good, audiobooks, and doing things orally.

However, I think kids can see a need, whether it's mom needing to tend to another child or to an ill dh. And I think it's *good* for kids to learn to see needs, so any training in that department will take them far. You might say it's in the discipline realm, or you might say it's in the realm of teaching them more than academics.

As to how to teach this skill of seeing others' needs, I think it's best done when there is no pressure and no immediate need. Maybe you could set aside 10 minutes every week to brainstorm a list of independent tasks, and then create a poster or something. Even with my 8th grader, I took a couple of cardstock pages and wrote in black marker "time to do book basket" and something about doing math now. When I'd get a doctor's phone call and could see my ds was waiting for me, I could pull those out of the nearby cart and hold them up for him to see :-)

Another method that one teacher uses sometimes at the place I tutor is to tell a child that they may ask her one question each while they are doing their classwork (20 minutes or less). That really makes them think twice before they ask a question! I'm more of a push-over, but I keep her method as a tool in the back of my mind in case I need it. My usual method is to tell a student to set that page aside and work on the rest of their work -- because I am HELPING SOMEONE ELSE RIGHT NOW :~ Kids are so tunnel visioned -- it's not just yours! Oh, and sometimes I am able to have one student help another student -- not sure how many kids you have, but I think they usually like that.

Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

rxmom
Posts: 31
Joined: Tue May 25, 2010 4:29 am

Re: RTR with a 6th--working toward Independence?

Unread post by rxmom » Wed Jul 28, 2010 6:27 am

Thank you, Lori and Julie...I will check out the audios...did not know about those.

Julie--I will try your suggestions. I agree that working with the child is crucial--"modeling" before setting them off on their own. We use our marker board a lot. Usually we "review" a topic on the marker board...kind of the "Who, What, When, Where, Why" its important...etc for our history summaries. Yesterday my ds actually completed a summary (albeit shorter than usual ;)) on his own without us doing all of this. I know there is value in this "review" process so I'm not going to completely give it up but it was nice for me to see that he could do this on his own...maybe a step toward some independence? I agree that teaching children to see others needs is way beyond academics...more important. Thank you for the suggestions...very helpful.
Blessed beyond measure...Lovin' MFW in SW VA
ds (14) ADV, ECC, CTG, RTR, EXP to 1850, 1850 to MT, Coming Soon...AHL!
ds (12) 1st grade, ADV, ECC, CTG, RTR, EXP to 1850, 1850 to MT
dd (9) MFWK, MFW1st, EXP to 1850, 1850 to MT

cbollin

Re: RTR with a 6th--working toward Independence?

Unread post by cbollin » Wed Jul 28, 2010 7:19 am

Hi Delcey,

some of the few tips I have with my 11 y.o who still needs lots of help with school, but working on a bit more work on her own, but needs help with focus?

*I've started to have her work more independently on things she is self motivated to do. She likes the art. So, she can do that. Sometimes, I save it for the end of the day to give her something to look forward to.
*she will do reading on her own sometimes if she goes to her room and reads to the cat while the cat is napping on the bed
*there are some computer things she can do during independent learning time so that she has a bit more productive time instead of just play

She is not ready for writing on her own. I wish.

We are a family of easy to distract people. Teen who is distracted by noises we make while she is reading her high school stuff, unless she is listening to K Love. Teen who has to come tell me something cool she just read in AHL. (I'm working on teaching her when not to interrupt my teaching of other kids). Youngest, with autism, who distracts me while teaching.... youngest who struggles to focus on anything that involves language with other people. Middle gal who spaces out. and we won't even go there with how distracted I am.

There are times where I just ignore the other kids and teach one on one for 30 minutes and get a lot done with that child.

not sure any of that helps in practical ways.

My middle gal is 6th grade now, and we're in RTR:
I work with her on Singapore Math for short time frames. She will do art on her own.
She will try some Singapore on her own, and then come to me at the end of the page with questions.
I work with her on Bible and summarize history stuff, she gets breakfast by herself and cleans it up.
I work with her on language arts She will do handwriting practice on her own.
I work with her on other stuff. She can do Rosetta Stone on her own

I look for things that my child can do on her own, and hope that some day those reading/writing/rithmetic things can slowly be more on her own. She'll do the art work on her history notebooks on her own and then some of the writing. Some of my goals are that as she works more toward independence, that she is learning productive stuff to do in the times where I can't give her full teaching focus.

-crystal

MFW-Lucy

Re: RTR with a 6th--working toward Independence?

Unread post by MFW-Lucy » Thu Jul 29, 2010 9:53 am

Delcey,

I just wanted to encourage you that your son is going to grow in this area. The gals here have given you some great ideas and I do not think I have much to add to that.

I did want to mention that it is o.k. if his summaries are a little shorter if he is writing them completely on his own. Most children can always dictate more to you than they are capable of either composing themselves or mechanically able to write down. Require what you think he is capable of and he will grow in this area too. My son also struggled in this area, but the I think the best thing I did for him was to stop taking dictation. When he is able to type this will also be a great way for him to compose instead of handwriting.

Lucy

rxmom
Posts: 31
Joined: Tue May 25, 2010 4:29 am

Re: RTR with a 6th--working toward Independence?

Unread post by rxmom » Thu Jul 29, 2010 1:11 pm

Crystal, Thank you for sharing...I am trying to pinpoint which things he can work more independently on --He loves Art so I will try that also. I think keyboarding, bookbasket, internet-linked history sites, reading, sometimes copywork...though I limit this for him sometimes. I am still working on getting him to do his Singapore and finish the page (circle any he is having trouble with so I can go over with him) and move on to something else instead of interrupting me when I'm with the other ones. I think this is going to take continuous effort..... best wishes for a successful year with your "working toward independence" 6th grader.

Thank You, Lucy, Yes, I am going to try to move more away from dictation, especially once he is keyboarding more. Thanks for the advice...its good to hear from those who have been there and "done that" and survived! I think we will make some strides this year. Last year was difficult as I had health issues, moving, etc and he may have been more "clingy" because of that. Praying for a more "normal" year....

Delcey
Blessed beyond measure...Lovin' MFW in SW VA
ds (14) ADV, ECC, CTG, RTR, EXP to 1850, 1850 to MT, Coming Soon...AHL!
ds (12) 1st grade, ADV, ECC, CTG, RTR, EXP to 1850, 1850 to MT
dd (9) MFWK, MFW1st, EXP to 1850, 1850 to MT

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest