Facts of Life - What age/grade does MFW introduce reproducti

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carieann77
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Facts of Life - What age/grade does MFW introduce reproducti

Unread post by carieann77 » Sat Feb 10, 2007 9:10 am

scmlg wrote:I have a question for you all. I have three boys, and am doing grades 1st and 3rd while combining a lot of it.

At what point in the curricula does reproduction come up for the first time??? Or does it????

My boys don't know ANYTHING about this area. I just had a baby and they were just content knowing that God created their baby brother (8 mos old now). They have not asked ANY questions about the how's of it all. Such good boys, huh? LOL

So, I'm just wondering when does this come up as Science??? How does MFW approach it?

I read the book Preparing your boy for Every Man's Battle, and that book says to have Dad go over that book at 9, I believe, and take it slow till he's 11. I'm pretty sure that's what it said.

Anyway, just wondering if I should be teaching this I guess, or if we are fine being in the "dark" so to speak.

If we were in public school, our third grader would probably already have heard more than enough from friends. We just want to be the first to bring it up... but when is it really appropriate? I always thought that eventually they'd ask, and that'd be some sort of sign. :) No questions though.

I would "assume" MFW teaches it at some point... just wondering when that is.

Thanks, (nervous mommy who isn't ready to break their innocence in it all)
Misty
Misty,
I don't know when MFW deals with that subject.

I just wanted you to know that until this year, my sons have been blissfully unaware of anything related to that subject. They are 9 and almost 7. The questions that have been coming are from the almost 7 year old. I think that the only reason we are getting those is because I am undergoing fertility treatments in the hopes of conceiving again and even though they aren't included in all the conversations/details, they are picking up bits and pieces (cause we all live together and for the most part are together all the time!!!) :)

We answer all questions honestly, directly and with the least amount of information possible for the question to be answered. If they press it further then we will elaborate, but really that has happened only once. I don't think that my 9 year old wants to know :) But the 7 year old does. I think that you are fine just letting it go until they ask.

I hope someone can answer your questions about MFW science though. I am interested in knowing :)
Blessings,
Carie
Wife to Norman
Momma to Lee, Greg, Norman "Bear" and Abigail
Lee and Greg - MFW 1st, Adventures, the Veritas Press and Sonlight. Public school after 7th grade.
Bear and Abby - MFW Preschool and MFWK this year
http://www.misscarie.blogspot.com

cbollin

Unread post by cbollin » Sat Feb 10, 2007 9:33 am

In terms of where MFW puts this in in curriculum...

The Wonderful Way Babies Are Made
Included with the Rome to the Reformation Basic Curriculum.

It's scheduled in weeks 19 and 20, but can be used separately, sooner or later if needed.

The t.m. says, "The ideas in this book are an important part of the human body unit, giving parents an opportunity to discuss reproduction from a wonderful Christian perspective. Please pray about how to best use this book with your family..... we do recommend that you read the book together rather than just giving the book to an older child to read independently."

The book has 2 "levels". One that is very young and one that is more detailed.

I know we added some other books for our oldest daughter to talk about all that specific "girl stuff" as well.

--crystal

Posted: Thu Jul 17, 2008 7:57 am
I just remembered --- there's some of this in ECC as well in terms of animal reproduction. So, there will be lots of times to talk further at various ages/stages.

scmlg
Posts: 35
Joined: Sat Sep 30, 2006 11:24 am

Unread post by scmlg » Sat Feb 10, 2007 10:01 am

Thank you... that's when they are in "5th" grade???

One last comment!!! LOL I just looked at the RtoR... WOW, I want to be there already. It looks like it has such wonderful books in it!!! Did I ever mention how much I love MFW????!!!

It's so strange, cuz I tell people about it, and they always ask if I've seen Sonlight. Yes, I have it's 3xs the cost, and we are enjoying MFW so much, it's so well written, and the books are so well chosen. I think I may start handing out catalogs. :)
Mom to 3 boys. Curtis, 11, Kyle, 9.5, Colton 3 years old. Live in Amish Country, Ohio.

Finished Adventures
Finished ECC
Finished CtoG
Working on R to R and a bit of preschool time

kellybell
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Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 2:40 pm

Unread post by kellybell » Sat Feb 10, 2007 5:10 pm

A few years ago it was our last year of sending the kids to school, and our oldest dd was entering third grade and it was parent-teacher night (where all the parents and none of the kids met the teacher). Anyway, she told us that if we hadn't yet explained the birds and the bees to do it soon because, for some unexplainable reason, if they don't know it at the start of third grade, they will by the end! Okay, this was at a "go to" school (as we call it!), even if it was a CHristian school...

I know we homeschool our kids and protect them from growing up too fast, but there is probably some truth to what this teacher said. Even homeschool kids learn things from neighborhood friends, church friends, camp buddies, fellow scouts, etc.

I'd rather my kids get the info (and more importantly the attitudes). We had the MFW recommended Wonderful Way Babies are Made from years ago (before we homeschooled) and it's a great book to spark discussion.

Oh, and moms of girls, don't forget that they are growing up faster than we did and don't forget THAT fun talk. Sigh.
Kelly, wife to Jim since 1988, mom to Jamie (a girl, 1994), Mary (1996), Brian (1998) and Stephanie (2001).

LSH in MS
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Unread post by LSH in MS » Sun Feb 11, 2007 9:28 am

I agree with Kelly, I want them to hear it first from me in a beautiful and Biblical context. Some things came up with my most recent pregnancy. We also answered the questions honestly. Kids hear things so young these days. I want them to know the right context and have the right information before they hear the perverted and evil version.
Lori

wife to Clifford, mother to ds (17), ds (16), ds (15, ds (13), ds (8), and ds (3)
MFW user for 10 years

InfertilityMom
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Unread post by InfertilityMom » Sun Feb 11, 2007 11:50 am

Like Carie, infertility has touched our home, and as a result our kids have asked a lot of questions.

Our now 7-year-old has always been a very detail-oriented, have-to-know why/how it works kind of kid, since before he could talk. So between all the medical treatments I was going through and then when friends started having younger siblings, he started asking very direct questions and we would answer him simply and truthfully, going as far as he led the conversation.

We has a book called "My Birthday, Jesus' Birthday" (highly recommend - not a "... book" but a great explanation about Christmas for little ones) that offered one page saying something along the lines of, "Mommy says that before I was born, God took a little bit of her and a little bit of Daddy and made me. That was my beginning. The Bible says Jesus had no beginning. Before He was born, He lived in Heaven." We also had a very simple board book that explained how babies are made (nothing graphic, but did include the mention an egg and a sperm, though not telling anything about where these would come from or how they would join)...

So, as I was pregnant with our daughter (born a month after our son's 3rd birthday), I hear him sitting with his great grandma and telling her, "God took a little bit of my Mommy, one of her eggs, and a little bit of my Daddy, one of his sperm, and made my baby sister in my Mommy's tummy!" How he figured out that the eggs and sperm were the little bits of Mommy and Daddy we have no idea. Neither of us had explained that, but he took the information he had, put it together and figured it out. He was about 5 when he started asking HOW the egg and sperm get together and the baby gets in Mommy's tummy.

We continue to let him lead and answer him honestly and directly and hopefully reflecting the wonder of God's creation and the beauty of God's limitations on how His gift is best enjoyed. What has been nice about this very natural and gradual progression of conversations is that they have never been uncomfortable for any of us and I pray that we are laying a good foundation so that when the kids are entering puberty they will always feel comfortable talking with us about what they are experiencing or wondering.
Jenni Saake, Nevada
after 10 years and 10 losses:
ds J. born 12/99 and dd R. 1/03, 1850s to Modern Times
ds J-Bear 1/06 finishing up K, looking toward 1st in early 2012
http://www.InfertilityMom.blogspot.com

scmlg
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Joined: Sat Sep 30, 2006 11:24 am

Unread post by scmlg » Mon Feb 12, 2007 2:00 pm

That is great, Jenni!! I really thought those questions were going to come up during my pregnancy with Colton. We read a couple of very very innocent books to tell them I was pregnant, but they didn't question further. I do want to be the first to introduce this all to them, I just wasn't sure about age appropriateness. So, it sounds like many of you think 8/9 is okay, if they are asking. I ordered some books, so we'll see what conversations spark from there. :)
Mom to 3 boys. Curtis, 11, Kyle, 9.5, Colton 3 years old. Live in Amish Country, Ohio.

Finished Adventures
Finished ECC
Finished CtoG
Working on R to R and a bit of preschool time

Julie in MN
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Location: Minnesota

The Wonderful Way Babies Are Made

Unread post by Julie in MN » Sat Nov 01, 2008 12:20 am

sewardmom wrote:MFW Sojourners,
I just previewed this book (WWBAM) and agree with previous posts that it is presented in a very loving and Christian way. I was wondering if anyone would be willing to share what you did with your family. I know this is a very personal decision and up to each of us. I would still appreciate any of you that are comfortable with sharing , to share :

- how old your children were when you shared the detailed portion of WWBAM
- and perhaps what led you to that choice of timing.
- any regrets or recommendations for others that have yet to venture into the 'detailed' waters.

So Glad God is God,
Terri
Posted: Sat Jun 28, 2008 4:16 pm
Hi Terri,
My son was at the end of 4th when we read the gentler version of the book and in 5th when we read the more advanced sections. In 6th, we read The Princess and the Kiss to begin exploring the idea of "waiting." In 7th, I plan to revisit the subject focusing on physical changes. (Probably a little later than ideal.)

As I recall, Marie describes in the teacher's manual how their family used the book. She took each child aside individually, one per week as I recall, and read together & answered questions. That sounds like a good way to meet each child at his own level.

Here are some other experiences:
Science http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php?t=2071
Bible http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php?t=3950
[and this thread]

Best wishes as you agonize over this :o)
Julie

cbollin

Unread post by cbollin » Sat Nov 01, 2008 12:24 am

Posted: Sat Jun 28, 2008 4:56 pm
Terri,
You’re right – different families will approach this differently. It’s times like these that make me miss the days of being able to post as “guest”. I blush easily.

One option --- you can skip over pages 31 and 32 from the book and save it until you think it is appropriate for your children to have purity discussions. Some families might feel more comfortable removing the page and keeping it in a file for later such as a personal purity retreat with their child.

Because my oldest was only 10 when we used RTR, we only read page 30 (the younger text) , skipped 31 (paragraph 2 on page 31 was too much for 10 years old in my not so humble opinion), and skimmed around on page 32. And we’ve read that book more than once as she got older. And especially now that she is in jr. high ages and around older kids in church – she needs those purity lessons with the “limited mechanics” that are given on those pages. It's interesting to me that 3 years later it seems "limited" (thankfully!!!!!) I didn't have the same response 3 years ago. LOL at myself.

-crystal

sewardmom
Posts: 44
Joined: Thu Mar 09, 2006 3:51 pm

Unread post by sewardmom » Sat Nov 01, 2008 12:26 am

kandbp wrote:For those skipping parts (of this or other books), how do you do that with a reading child? My dd reads so quickly that I would have to not allow her to be looking at the pages with me. Is that what you do?
Kirsten
Posted: Sat Jun 28, 2008 8:31 pm
Kirsten,

Sometimes I use post its to cover the area I am skipping...

~Terri

cbollin

Unread post by cbollin » Sat Nov 01, 2008 12:31 am

Posted: Sat Jun 28, 2008 8:46 pm

For the more general question of how to keep them from reading ahead when you are reading out loud (any book) :
One thing that’s normal around here is that when they are sitting next to me while I’m reading out loud, I tend to put an arm on the page that I’m not reading so that they aren’t reading ahead of where I’m speaking. It keeps me from getting distracted too and holds the book down.

I’ve also just put an envelope or piece of paper on the page that I’m not reading. Reduces distractions and helps.

For some books the girls are not always sitting next to us but will be on the floor crocheting, or practicing gymnastics or something.

-crystal

GoodCat
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Joined: Tue Oct 03, 2006 1:00 am

Unread post by GoodCat » Sat Nov 01, 2008 12:32 am

Posted: Sun Jun 29, 2008 7:32 am

A few months ago my oldest dd who's 12 started asking more in depth questions. So I got out the encyclopedia and had a talk with her. But it still wasn't complete I don't think. So I'm looking forward to reading this book with her and maybe my ds who's 11. I think it will cover things I wasn't sure how to. I will most likely read the basic version to my ds who's 9 and maybe my ds 11. We'll see. I'm just glad for a resource that helps me to know how much to say. They can hear it from other places, so I'd rather they hear it from me :)

Cathy

Mommyto2
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Anatomy and reproduction

Unread post by Mommyto2 » Tue Dec 30, 2008 10:37 pm

doubleportion wrote:When is anatomy and reproduction introduced? :)
Edie
Posted: Thu Jul 17, 2008 7:37 am
We used Adventures last year and I don't know which week (somewhere in the last half of the year), there is a science unit about the body or skeleton. Anyway we checked out the big body books from the library from Eyewitness and one other one. They are all pictures with explanations around as to what is what in the body. The kids (5 and 8 at the time) loved them and we walked through what things were in the body.

Well of course reproduction came up while both were sitting there looking at the pictures. The subject will also come up in every day life when you have friends who are pregnant or when you bring home a science book. We are answering their questions as they ask to the point where it is appropriate for their age.

I know kids in the public school discuss these things in detail early on in elementary. I want to wait for the details until later. I think I was in 5th or 6th grade. That sounds good to me.

Brenda
mom to ds 9 and dd 6

baileymom
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Unread post by baileymom » Tue Dec 30, 2008 10:42 pm

Posted: Fri Jul 18, 2008 9:40 pm

I just had my 6th child. All of my children who are able to understand know how each of the babies were born, but as for how they came about, LOVE is the answer I have given to them so far.

If a lot of the real facts are included in RTR, I would just wait until then, unless something comes up and you feel like you need to explain something.

Some of the other moms mentioned a few books, my girls have the "Body Book" by the American Girl Library, and it is pretty good at explaining some things that girls will have to go through with puberty and such (a little early at 6, I know) just a little FYI.

RJ's Momma
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Unread post by RJ's Momma » Tue Dec 30, 2008 10:45 pm

Posted: Sun Jul 20, 2008 3:15 pm

If you want a natural way to introduce this topic I suggest getting some farm cats and/or chickens:) Not much my 9 year old doesn't know about THEM reproducing. lol Luckily she hasn't made the connection. She doesn't need to know EXACTLY how babies are made (other than by GOD, that I've told her).

Shannon

RachelT
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Unread post by RachelT » Tue Dec 30, 2008 10:47 pm

Posted: Sun Jul 20, 2008 10:36 pm

I am not to RTR, yet, but we purchased the first book in the series that SJ talked about (the God's Design for series at CBD) and it does not explain how babies are made, it just introduces parts (a boy and his baby sister are different) and some things about the baby growing inside the mother and then nursing from the mother, etc. It's very sweet and is just a beginning of this series. My 5 and 7 yr. olds have heard it a few times. (We haven't moved on to the next book, yet.)

It is called "The Story of Me: Book 1" in the "God's Design for ..." Series.

My neighbors also gave us some guppy fish (a male and female), so we will see what happens with that...

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