Special Needs - Teaching & resources for specific needs

Art, Foreign Language, Music, Nature Walks, as well as general ideas and encouragement
Julie in MN
Posts: 2927
Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 3:44 pm
Location: Minnesota

Re: Need help with autistic son

Unread post by Julie in MN » Sat Jan 30, 2010 10:18 am

Hi Missy,
I have only minimal experience tutoring special needs kids, but I had a couple of questions as I thought about your struggles.

1. Does he like workbooks? Does he seem to learn well that way (visually, writing)?

2. Is it possible to put him in a different program altogether than his sister? It wouldn't have to be from MFW, but I was actually thinking about MFW 1st, because I'm thinking of using the 1st Proverbs with my 8th grade ds this upcoming semester. He has no special needs but I think they'd be good for the 14yo stage of life :) I got the idea from Lucy. Anyways, 1st also uses stories from the Bible, which wouldn't have to sound babyish, and thorough phonics. But either way, maybe if he did something different than his sister, he wouldn't compare himself quite as much?

Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

zeemama
Posts: 1
Joined: Tue May 15, 2007 8:14 am
Location: Des Moines, IA

Re: Need help with autistic son

Unread post by zeemama » Sat Jan 30, 2010 10:53 am

Hi everyone,

Thank you for your responses. Caleb actually can't stand workbooks. The only reason I'm thinking about using them is that in this way I could show that he is making some progress. If I had my way about it, I would only use things like starfall. I do need to incorporate more sensory activities during the day. But unfortunately money is tight. :( I will definately think about what you all have suggested. Thanks for your ideas. Talk to you later.
God Bless,
Missy

Wife to Doug for 14 years, mom to Mary-13, Caleb-11, Ashley-9 and Chris-6

Julie in MN
Posts: 2927
Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 3:44 pm
Location: Minnesota

Re: Need help with autistic son

Unread post by Julie in MN » Sat Jan 30, 2010 5:14 pm

zeemama wrote:Caleb actually can't stand workbooks.
Hmmm... I wonder if you can create a paper trail using something other than workbooks? Is there anything he enjoys along the lines of creating his own pages about things he learns? Can he type? Can he search Google Images for illustrations? Could he cut out magazine pictures & create an informational page about the topics you studied for the day? Just brainstorming what could get the same results in a way he was more invested in...

Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

mgardenh
Posts: 174
Joined: Thu Oct 04, 2007 4:55 pm

Re: Need help with autistic son

Unread post by mgardenh » Sat Jan 30, 2010 6:19 pm

Not all sensory things cost money. You can use sand on a cookie sheet and let him draw or write. Use shaving cream and have him do figure eights and drawing and other things (kind of messy but fun). Or cornstarch and water is fun too. Mix cornstarch in a baking pan. You can make so that when you put your finger in slowly it will sink, but do it quickly and it is hard like (very cool very sensory oriented). Have him bounce on a bed (if you will allow it). Swing at a park or back yard if have one. Jump up and down. There are all sorts of things to do. The out of sync child has lots of ideas (look for it at the library.
Mike
DH to Laurel
SAHD (mostly) to
Julia - 10 years old, Explorations to 1850
Alexis-7 years old, Explorations to1850 see her story at
http://www.caringbridge.org/visit/alexisg
Have used MFW, k, 1st, Adventures, and ECC, CTG, RtR

RachelT
Posts: 352
Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 2:45 pm

Re: Need help with autistic son

Unread post by RachelT » Mon Feb 01, 2010 6:25 pm

Hi! I don't know much about your autistic son's needs, but I'm coming at this from the angle of different learning styles and my own son's special reading and writing needs. My son also knew all of the basic consonant and short vowel sounds and some of the blends, but that's when reading and especially spelling became frustrating and difficult for him. Last year (in 2nd gr) he was tested and found to have dyslexia, but I think some of the things we are doing could benefit any reader. (I am NOT telling you that your child is dyslexic, I have no idea!) Something I have learned about the way my son learns is that he needs a multi-sensory, sequential teaching approach and most basic phonics programs could only get him so far and then he would break down. We use a system that teaches specific sounds (phonics) and spelling rules with letter tiles that are color coded and we don't even move to paper (or the white board) until after we have practiced with those. I am not familiar with your son, but I wonder if instead of a workbook approach - where he has to read and write - he would actually benefit from a more hands-on, multi-sensory kind of approach. My son is very visual, but he learns best when he is also using his hands (kinesthetic), hearing it (aural), and speaking it (oral). I think that you need to find a way to go with what your heart is telling you, because if he doesn't learn best by sitting and doing a workbook, he may have even worse behavior problems. Behavior issues may improve if he is being able to learn in a way that "clicks" for him.

Something I love about MFW is that we can go lots of things orally (I read books aloud for science, history, Bible, etc.) and we have lots of hands-on activities! We are doing ECC this year, too!

Hugs,
Rachel :)
Rachel, wife to Doug ~ 1995, mom to J (17) and B (15)
MFW K (twice), 1st (twice), Adv., ECC, & CtG 2006-2010,
Classical Conversations 2010-2016,
ECC/AHL 2016-17, eclectic 2017-18, WHL & US1 2018-19

http://rachelsreflections-rachelt.blogspot.com/

s_duguid
Posts: 55
Joined: Sat Mar 22, 2008 5:45 am
Location: Albany, NY

Central Auditory Processing

Unread post by s_duguid » Mon Jun 07, 2010 8:00 am

Just Clay wrote:I have a friend who's son has been diagnosed with CAP - Central Auditory Processing. Does anyone have experience with this diagnosis (he will be in 4th grade)? If so, do you have a favorite reference book, about CAP, that has been helpful as you have worked along side your child.

Thank you,
Annette
My younger son has been diagnosed with CAP along with a language impairment. Granted, I have not read a book on CAP, but one possible book that looks VERY interesting is: When the Brain Can't Hear : Unraveling the Mystery of Auditory Processing Disorder, by Teri James Bellis. My local library has this title and offers this description: comprehensive and prescriptive, this volume contains vital information on how APD affects children educationally and affects adults socially and professionally. It contains memory enhancement techniques and other coping solutions.

My son has some other idiosyncrasies.

Anyway, my experience with CAP is we have yet to determine if it is an issue of storage or retrieval. Liken it to a filing cabinet. Is my son taking the information that he receives and putting it into the wrong file folder, or is the breakdown when he tries to retrieve the info and can't remember which file he put it in? Or is it a combination of the two? There are a few areas that were recommended to aid in the auditory processing such as sitting close to the person/teacher giving out information, reducing white noise, reducing distractions . . . Now I'm starting to confuse his auditory vs language-based issues, but I think one is have your child repeat back the instructions to make sure they heard them. Multi-step instructions really throw them for a loop, so break them down into sizable, easy-to-handle chunks.

The biggest thing for him is giving him strategies to help him cope. He is an average student and we are just praying that as the classes gets tougher that he will ask for help and be able to pass. Now, I know that this will not be as helpful since my son is not homeschooled.

CAP, to my understanding, is quite a large umbrella. I hope your friend can get some answers.
Sue, married 20 years and mother to 3 (only homeschooling one):
TJ (18), college sophomore
Drew (17), high school senior
Victoria (12) starting 1850-MOD in fall
  • completed Exp_1850, RtR, CtG, ECC, ADV

cbollin

Re: Central Auditory Processing

Unread post by cbollin » Mon Jun 07, 2010 8:36 am

Good description and analogy that Sue shared. I think it is helpful regardless of where a child goes to school.

I have to stop and remember some of this. My middle child, 11 y.o now, was my kiddo that the speech language pathologists weren’t sure if CAPD or just receptive/expressive language delays was the better fit diagnosis. that was about 6 or so years ago and I was more concerned about child #3 and autism. blah!!! someone remind me again? this isn't my fault that my kids are like this?

Basically my daughter's speech experts decided to write down mixed receptive/expressive delay, and the insurance was happy to pay it. So, we went with that. Basically, when the therapists said "we treat the child, not the label" I didn't care what it was called because lots of the same techniques are used regardless.

On the other hand, we never went to the audiologist for the full eval for CAPD. I sometimes wonder if we should get back and pursue something again for my middle gal. What if that lady at the Nashville convention was onto something and my kiddo is having some kind of mini strokes going on? After 6 years of speech therapy my middle gal did finally graduate enough that she didn’t “need” it according to the evaluation tests. But she isn’t exactly, uh, normal either. very slow with language. But at the same time, she's great at retelling everything that happened and can make it sound like a TV show documentary with right inflection and all of that. So, in spite of her problems, she's gifted too. just not going to be in academics all the time.

I don’t have a fav book on the topic. I’m not seeing a specific book on strategies for CAPD.

One helpful site in general for CAPD and other learning issues (linked here to the CAPD article)
http://www.ldonline.org/article/5919

another resource out there (and look through her book selection) for sensory, and autism/adhd ish stuff
headsupnow.com

What kinds of things is your friend looking for? Can we homeschool with LD’s? And needs some hugs?

-crystal

cbollin

Uppercase Lauri letters for a child who needs routine? Auti

Unread post by cbollin » Thu Sep 09, 2010 5:30 pm

Mexmarr wrote:My daughter is special needs. Gracie will be 6 in November. She is legally blind, and she has some other issues that appear autistic. She is NOT good with change. Things are supposed to be done the same way or she has a meltdown. We are working on teaching her that life doesn't always work that way. (Just because I served grapes with the quesadillas, doesn't mean that you ALWAYS have grapes with them, for example). At the same time, sometimes I accommodate the sameness thing, as she learns better that way.

I think the MFWK is going to be great in that it has the same routine repeated over and over.

With that background, she is having a REALLY hard time with the lowercase letters. She is asking to learn to read, and she can spell simple word orally. It is the letters that are more trying! Part of it must be that she only sees them if she holds them right in front of her face and intentionally focus on them. I think that the flash cards will be really helpful. The alphabet chart is WAY too small, for sure! I know that she will have to learn lowercase, eventually. But I wonder if I should get some uppercase letters and use them for awhile. My thought is that using the uppercase will keep things in her comfort zone for a while. And after she builds some confidence there, then adding the lowercase. Or would that simply prolonging the inevitable??? Should I just keep working with the lowercase until she is comfortable? Thoughts???
I think if it helps to transition to understanding lower case letters, then find a way to incorporate both for a while. On the MFW K flashcards (when you get them), both upper and lower are presented. so, if she needs to have some tangible (upper case Lauri, or make your own from whatever -- wood with sandpaper, or anything)... I think it sounds ok.
here's a sample of the flashcard showing both
http://www.mfwbooks.com/nw_flashcard_.htm#sample
Mexmarr wrote:Crystal, can you tell me a little more about autism, please? I know very little. She does the repetitive movements, and sometimes can be in her own little world, and those things seem autistic to me. At church she rarely plays with the kids, as she can't keep up with them. BUT she walks from adult to adult and carries on conversations with them. She talks and talks and talks and asks the most provoking questions. Those don't seem like autistic traits to me. I know you have some experience with this. What do you think?

Just for fun, one of Gracie's recent statements was, "Momma do you know what we have in out head besides brains and stuff? A spit factory!"
((hugs))) nothing like not being sure, but knowing something is wrong. (((hugs))) My only "expertise" in autism is with my kiddos. I'm not a doctor or anything. I'm a mom of a kid on the spectrum!

symptoms for autism will come in lack in 4 areas of development: social, language, symbolic play, and behavior stuff. There is a type of autism on the spectrum called Asperger's where the child develops language normally (or sounds like a little professor) but has the other stuff.

I'd encourage you to look into this screening tool (it is not a diagnostic tool... just a screening tool to discuss with doctor)
http://www.childbrain.com/pddassess.html
you click around and it tells you how to grade each question for severity. I'd look over that screening tool and if it ends up saying mild cases, definitely talk with pediatrician for further info.

For a while one doctor thought my middle daughter would be on the autism spectrum because of her language development was a lot of "repeating scripts" for way longer than is "normal development", and takes a long time to process auditory information. But, she was way too into pretend play at age 3 years. not autism at all. she needed speech and language therapy until age 9. She's just slow and "blonde".

Now, my youngest on the other hand....
she had all of the "sensory issues" associated with autism spectrum (very sensory seeker to extremes)
she still at age 8 mostly uses repeated words on TV to try to communicate.
She is becoming very social but almost no interaction with children expect her siblings and maybe a few kids at the speech clinic -- she said hi to a kid yesterday. She says hi to kids at church. but that's it.
she now has great pretend play skills. Those did not develop naturally at all.

so with that in mind..... Gracie doesn't sound like she'd fit a diagnosis of classical autism (because of her conversational skills and thoughtful insights). Some 5 year olds are in their own world at times. some kids have repetitive stuff, but it can be just "normal part of being a weird kid".

My daughter's conversation sounds more like a 3.5 year old or lower. When she's in her own world, it really is weird. It's not like she's just playing alone, she's in Yo Gabba Gabba land, or playing Calliou, and wants me to go along with the script. Eventually those phrases take on meaning. I use to describe it this way: picture a room of Star Trek fans who are all geeks. And they don't just merely quote the scripts, and they don't do fan fiction with it, they quote lines for meaningful conversation.

I know Mike on the board (mgardenh) has a daughter with Asperger's. He might have some insights too.

Some of what she does may be more related to the vision issues and coping that way? that's a guess as I don't know what that is like. Some of it might be just preferences in what she does.

-crystal

mgardenh
Posts: 174
Joined: Thu Oct 04, 2007 4:55 pm

Re: Would you use uppercase lauri letters....? & autism ques

Unread post by mgardenh » Sun Sep 12, 2010 1:13 pm

Mexmar,
I've been stewing over your post. Particularly about the Autism. Here's what I think. Autism is a spectrum. So not everyone will be the same. Not everyone will have the classic symptoms.

My thoughts are that because she is legally blind or nearly blind what she is displaying may just be from being blind. Rocking, repeating, and all those kinds of things I could see a blind person possibly doing (especially a child) due to being blind. A blind person can't stand change because if you move something they don't know where it is. It would be important to do it the same way. So it could be part of that. I am no expert.

My advice if you have concerns is to talk to your pediatrician or if you have a therapist or psychologist, or psychiatrist talk to them about your concerns. They may not be able to diagnose it but would be able to put you in the direction of who would. Or they could tell you no they don't think so.

I think that you have a complex issues going on and you need outside help to decide what might be going on with your dd. Of course this is just my opinion and I am not a professional or expert and really don't know anything about the blind. So if something speaks to you or doesn't just remember this is coming from someone who doesn't know you or your child.
Mike
DH to Laurel
SAHD (mostly) to
Julia - 10 years old, Explorations to 1850
Alexis-7 years old, Explorations to1850 see her story at
http://www.caringbridge.org/visit/alexisg
Have used MFW, k, 1st, Adventures, and ECC, CTG, RtR

Mexmarr
Posts: 57
Joined: Sun Jul 25, 2010 2:26 pm
Contact:

Re: Would you use uppercase lauri letters....? & autism ques

Unread post by Mexmarr » Sun Sep 12, 2010 1:31 pm

Thanks for the thoughts. I did the test, and the interesting thing was that on most things she was either really high or really low, and the high things were all things that could go along with the blindness. It was helpful for me to see how many of the symptoms were not an issue at all.

I feel like I have a good handle on caring for her. I took a number of "Parents of Blind Children" courses when she was younger and learned how to apply what a therapist would do to everyday life. It helped immensely, and honestly, now our life really isn't much different than if she were sighted. And she really does get along just great. Sure there are challenges, and of course she tries the "I can't, I'm blind" bit, but I don't buy it and she figures it out.

And back to the original question, I ended up getting the Uppercase Lauri letters free from Amazon (with a gift card). I will just use the uppercase and then add the lowercase in when I am able to get them. I'm really looking forward to the Cuisinare Rods, too!
Misty, Wife to a wonderful man! Mother to:
Rosy age 8 - 3rd grade, ECC
Gracie age 7- K and ECC orally (legally blind, Aspergers)
Lizzie age 4 1/2 - waiting to start K!
Andy age 3
Rebekah age 2
Ruthie born March 31st

Completed 1st and Adventures

TriciaMR
Posts: 999
Joined: Thu Sep 20, 2007 11:43 am

Need Help with ECC Teacher's Guide

Unread post by TriciaMR » Mon Nov 29, 2010 11:52 am

retromomma wrote:I have been homeschooling for 5 years and have used MFW curriculum before (K and 1st grade). The other years I pulled together my own curriculum. This year I needed something easier because I was starting to burnout and feeling overwhelmed so we decided to go with ECC. I was really excited but I have just been struggling.

My challenge is that one of my girls has high functioning autism and the other has ADHD so if I start flipping back and forth in the teacher's guide and they lose my attention for even 30 seconds then they think we have taken a break and we have to all take time to refocus. As a result the scripts where I can just keep reading down a page without missing a beat work really well [K & 1st]. I am finding that just by flipping to reference pages or questions things just don't flow. I spend more time saying, "Give me just a second to figure out what we need to do now" rather than just teaching like we use to do. I was just hoping someone else might have come up with a work around as I have loved MFW in previous years and my girls really love the ideas of traveling to different countries.

Is there one spot that just has everything like the K & 1st grade curriculum did? I am just pretty desperate and wouldn't be asking for help if I wasn't completely at my wits' end.
Thanks-
Jennifer
Mom to 10 year old girl and 8 year old girl
Jennifer,
You have the opposite trouble most of us have with 1st (no grid) :)
{Hugs}

Some ideas...
I think someone summarized the ECC supply list into one long list - maybe on the ideas board here? How about printing that out.

I use a sticky tab (like a post-it note) to mark the grid page. Then, if it says, "See notes" I quickly flip and scan and see if there is anything I need to read directly, or if it is just a heads up. (Now, I did first edition, so I don't know how the manual has changed. We didn't have the 7th/8th grid).

I just look at the supply list the weekend before and make sure I have it on hand. Then, when it comes up in the project(s) or science, then I know I have it and go get it. I don't try to have it out and ready (though I know some people do).

Use another post-it to mark the page where the book list in the back is. Just advance it each week as you reserve your library books (if you can, online). I only refer to that once a week, so it's not a lot of "flipping."

I guess I feel like there is less "flipping" in ECC/CTG/RTR because I'm not flipping to different parts of the manual for different subjects.

Are you forgetting things - like "are we suppose to do narration after we read the POE book?" Perhaps you make a little mark in your grid (like an "N") after the topics you're suppose to have them narrate.

-Trish
Trish - Wife to Phil, Mom to Toni(18), Charlie(14), and Trent(14)
2014-2015 - AHL, CTG
2015-2016 - WHL, RTR
2016-2017 - EXP1850, US1877
2017-2018 - DE, 1850MOD
2018-2019 - College, AHL
My blog

cbollin

Re: Need Help with ECC Teacher's Guide

Unread post by cbollin » Mon Nov 29, 2010 1:11 pm

(side note.... have you heard of Sizzle Bop, and/or HeadsUp Now.com) great resources for those of us with adhd and autism kids.

As the mom of a kid on the autism spectrum..... I get what you’re saying. Give that little sizzler a minute, and she’s out to yo gabba gabba land. I totally get what you're saying now.

When she used MFW K, I had to be at the top of my game so I was always ready. It meant that I had to spend 5-10 minutes the night before to run through the upcoming day’s lesson and have the stuff right there.

Now, there were days, I was at the bottom of my game. And it meant, I’d lose her attention. So, in K that wasn’t so bad because eventually she’d come back to eat something at night and we’d get that craft done.

At the top of my game, I had a master list of the outline of K and of 1st. Those notes were pinned on the wall. At a glance I could see the daily game plan (i.e. the grid), and then, I had my personal notes of “each time we do this kind of lesson, do this and this).

In ECC, you may find it necessary to make a master list of that intro to the manual. Two ways come to mind based on my experiences.

(1) Remove the spiral and take the notes out of the manual and display them for you to see and have a quick reference chart. Also, this means the children will see it and might learn the routines too. Kwim? Use a colored highlighter to highlight specifics that apply just to the ages and stages of your children. But basically, I would remove the intro pages, and keep them visible to me as a teacher and highlight in ways that work for you. What does visible mean? It could mean you don’t have a wall with other decorations. Been there, doing that!


(2) The other thing that comes to mind? Just sit down at the computer and write only the relevant parts of the intro for you. I would include a note for myself that the night before, to gather the day’s supplies and do a dry run practice from the teacher point of view.

Does this mean MFW isn’t open and go? Not really. It just means that when we have special learners we (as teachers) sometimes have to be way more at the top of game each day than our friends who can just open and go.

Use post it notes (or paperclips) in the books to mark your place before you begin the day’s work.

Overall, I can see most days in ECC needing a teacher dry run (to get pages marked, etc.) to be about 15 minutes or so for all subjects. So, either at breakfast, or before the kids wake up, or something like that. I think you’ll have a bigger time to make the intro notes, but then daily notes and prep will be in the 10-15 minute range for you. The biggest hurdle in ECC with supplies- Global Art. You have to decide ahead of time (Saturday?) which projects you are doing and get the right stuff ready.

Use some visual aids to keep the visual learners on pace.

When you need to break, have something ready that they can work on so you don’t lose them. That way they know “if we take a 5 minute break in lesson, I will do 10 sit ups and wait patiently for mom.” Or something like that. Our special kids need that kind of specific directions of what to do to remain on task when interruptions happen.

Set the timer, so they have an idea when to return to the table.

It’s not easy to teach our kind of kids. But MFW is usable in the special needs environment. It might mean some extra teacher prep. But it doesn’t mean extra lesson prep!

Most of the ideas I shared with you, come from watching how the speech therapist and occupational therapists work with my child and how as professionals they don’t lose their place even when interrupted. I’ve watched the speech lady forget things and so she gives an instruction to my daughter to come to the other room with her and help her look for the Big book. or whatever.

Does any of that apply to your house the way it does to mine?

My other suggestion would be for you to pick up the telephone and call MFW and ask for some personal one on one help. They enjoy serving customers that way and I think that approach might help you a bit. It might be nice to have that personal time to walk through it. I know on forums we can offer great help, and want to encourage that too, but just saying that the phone option is there.

-crystal

momtogc
Posts: 78
Joined: Fri Sep 07, 2007 11:25 pm
Location: AR

Re: Need Help with ECC Teacher's Guide

Unread post by momtogc » Mon Nov 29, 2010 5:05 pm

I understand exactly what you are talking about. As time goes on, I believe you will begin to see somewhat of a pattern and you will know which page contains what, and this might help reduce the flipping back and forth so much.

To really simplify things for me, I made up my own grid-like lesson plan. I put in all the page numbers, notes, and I include extra stuff that we do like piano or field trips, etc. It takes me about 30 minutes a week to get it all together. It's a little extra work but for me, it has been so worth it because I don't have to look to the grid in the TM much at all now.

Also, like someone else mentioned, I use sticky notes - one to mark the current week in the body of the TM and one to mark the book list at the back of the TM on the current week. At the beginning of the year, I made a master list from the Teaching Tips pages in the front of the TM and kept it right by my side as we went along, initially. Now I don't really have to refer to it as much either. I'd be glad to share it with you if you want to see if it's something you could use.

:)
Mom to Gabi, a fun-loving and happy girl!
MFW 1st, Adventures, ECC, CTG, RTR, Exp-1850

Julie in MN
Posts: 2927
Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 3:44 pm
Location: Minnesota

Re: Need Help with ECC Teacher's Guide

Unread post by Julie in MN » Mon Nov 29, 2010 10:22 pm

I used so many different manuals with my older dd, and all of them required SEVERAL hundred pages for ONE SUBJECT! Or there were several pieces for one subject... So when I found MFW, I was just amazed at the genius of Marie's design.

To me, there is a learning curve at the beginning of the year, realizing how each subject will flow. And if you have several kids, I'm sure that learning curve is harder than I experienced at my house (I only used MFW with my youngest). But I do get nervous starting out most years.

However, after a while, I can open and go. All the page numbers are there on the grid. If there is a note, then the grid says "(see notes)". I can cross off, check off, or highlight each thing as it is done (including the "see notes" part), and clearly see what is left to do.

If something needed to be added to the grid, such as PLL, then I either penciled it in as we did it, or penciled in the whole year's plan during the summer. I can't think of anything from 3rd to 6th grade where Marie didn't hold my hand in telling me what to plug into my grid -- exact Singapore lesson plans, exact PLL/ILL lesson numbers for each grade, exact Writing Strand lessons, even math facts practice in some years. Of course, I often adapted for my own interests & needs, but if I wanted to just fall back on a plan, it always felt like it was there. And everything was laid out on one page for the entire week. My life has been crazy sometimes, and so I really valued being able to see the big picture for the week. That way, I could choose what to assign independently or what to substitute or what to let go. I never felt I had to flip through manuals for 6 different subjects, and most importantly I never risked forgetting about the most important thing because everything was there on the one grid.

I guess this is just to encourage you that an initial learning curve (and the first weeks with lots of notes in the manual) might be worth the effort? I hope it is for you. Blessings as you find your footing,
Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

TriciaMR
Posts: 999
Joined: Thu Sep 20, 2007 11:43 am

Dyslexia and MFW

Unread post by TriciaMR » Fri Apr 01, 2011 2:01 pm

mamamarys4 wrote:Background first: I have 4 children. My oldest is severely dyslexic. My second is a "classical" dyslexic. My third is "normal" and competitive. I have strong suspicions about my youngest, but I won't give her any labels until she has developed further. I put a label on dyslexia because I think there is just as much harm in not acknowledging valid labels as there is in not labeling whatsoever. We attempted public school for 2 years. In the end I pulled her out and started homeschooling and the CM approach seemed to be the approach that made the most sense given her strengths and weaknesses at the time. We have eclectically home schooled for 5 years, but now that I have 3 to school actively I have found this approach too straining.

My husband and I are fairly sold on MFW to provide most of our instruction to our children. The older 2 will have daily work form Barton Reading to help them overcome their difference in addition to this program. I'm just wondering if others struggle with dyslexia and utilize MFW as well and what your experience has been.
Yes. I would call my dd mildly dyslexic, and one of my twin sons is probably about the same (no formal diagnosis, just Mother's intuition :) ). MFW has been wonderful for us. I do use All About Spelling instead of Spelling Power, but plan on switching back to it when my oldest finishes All About Spelling. The option to do Primary Language Lessons and Intermediate Language Lessons mostly orally with my oldest (writing/spelling are her weak areas) has been a wonderful blessing for us. We do a lot of double dictation for notebooking and writing, where as with a workbook program it was very hard to modify to account for that.

We love it. My kids are thriving and don't hate school.

-Trish
Trish - Wife to Phil, Mom to Toni(18), Charlie(14), and Trent(14)
2014-2015 - AHL, CTG
2015-2016 - WHL, RTR
2016-2017 - EXP1850, US1877
2017-2018 - DE, 1850MOD
2018-2019 - College, AHL
My blog

LSH in MS
Posts: 208
Joined: Sat Feb 19, 2005 9:26 am

Re: Dyslexia and MFW

Unread post by LSH in MS » Fri Apr 01, 2011 5:41 pm

I think MFW is wonderful to use with dyslexic students because of all of the read alouds and discussion. You can also adjust the writing to fit their level. I am also using Barton Reading and Spellilng with one ds and AAS with another one.
Lori

wife to Clifford, mother to ds (17), ds (16), ds (15, ds (13), ds (8), and ds (3)
MFW user for 10 years

jasntas
Posts: 469
Joined: Sun Apr 26, 2009 6:10 pm

Re: Dyslexia and MFW

Unread post by jasntas » Sat Apr 02, 2011 2:28 pm

MFW has been a blessing to us.

My story in short, I hope. I attempted to hs my ds in K with a more advanced workbooky type program, unaware he was dyslexic. He was (and is) very bright so I thought he could handle it. It was a disaster. Thinking I was a failure I sent him to ps for 1st and 2nd. He didn't do any better there. I brought him home for 3rd knowing there was a problem but still not knowing it was dyslexia. By the end of 3rd we finally figured it out. He is now in 4th and says he really likes school.

We have used MFW ADV and will soon finish ECC. It has been very easy to adapt it to fit our needs with very little tweaking. (I was tweaking it in 3rd before I knew what the problem was.)

I now highly suspect my 1st grade dd is also dyslexic. But we are just figuring this out. I still plan to continue her in the MFW 5 year cycle with her brother and tweaking as needed for her as well.

My ds just started using MUS because Singapore didn't seem to be sticking (although I really like it). He uses Barton and is currently near the end of level 3. Everything else is MFW and their recommendations, including ILL. He does most of ILL verbally and is doing fine with it. We have not started Writing Strands yet. I am waiting until he is a little more confident in his writing.

As Lori stated, MFW is wonderful to use with dyslexic students because of all of the read alouds and discussions. And there is a good balance of hands on projects (art/science/etc.) I have added lapbooks only because my dc enjoy them and love seeing them up on the closet door in our 'classroom'.

I have told my dh more than once that if I couldn't use MFW I don't know that I would want to hs.

As you can probably tell, we LOVE MFW at our house!! :-)

HTH

P.S. I just thought I'd mention that RachelT here on the board also uses MFW with her dyslexic son. She occasionally posts and also has a blog that's mentioned at the bottom of her signature line. You might look up some of her old posts to see how she has used MFW. I hope she doesn't mind my mentioning this. :~

Postby jasntas » Sat Apr 09, 2011 5:07 pm
My ds has not yet been formally tested but will be by summer thanks to a very generous relative. The testing is expensive and is not covered by insurance and most schools do not specifically test for it. I think TX is the only state right now that test for it specifically in schools. IDK

My ds has been using the Barton system this school year and has made progress. Slow but still progress. As far as the cost, yes it is very expensive but you can make most of your money back by posting it on ebay or other sources.

The Barton web site is a little confusing at first (at least for me) so I'll tell you how to get to the warning signs page without having to search. When you find the Barton Reading and Spelling site go to the list on the left side. Roll over the word "Dyslexia". Then click on "Warning Signs". For the written list, click on "For a complete list of warning signs, click here". If you want to watch a free webcast click on "Dyslexia: Symptoms & Solutions, click here". I think the webcast is something like 3 hours long but very informative.

When I watched the webcast I sat and cried because Susan Barton was describing my ds. Specifically when she talked about the difficulties a lot of dyslexics have learning to tie their shoes and when she showed a handwriting sample.

Oh, and before I knew my ds was dyslexic we used All About Spelling. It didn't work for him, just moved too fast, but he is definitely more severe than some.
Tammie - Wife to James for 27 years
Mom to Justin (15) and Carissa (12)
ADV & K 2009-2010 . . . RTR (again) & WHL 2016-2017
http://tammiestime.blogspot.com/
The days of a mother are long but the years are short.

pinkchopsticks
Posts: 3
Joined: Sat May 01, 2010 11:35 pm

Re: Dyslexia and MFW

Unread post by pinkchopsticks » Sun Apr 10, 2011 10:55 pm

I have 4 children. One is dyslexic, and I think my youngest will also have similar issues. This is my first year with MFW and it has been such a blessing. We are able to finish most of the MFW programs (we are doing 2) in the am and then I still have time to tutor my daughter in reading. I have feel like this is the first year that we have been able to finish a school day in a normal amount of time....other curriculums were taking me all day long with all the 1:1 time that I needed to spend with my dd. Also, I love the focus on ministry. It is not just all focused on academics, but also on serving others.

RachelT
Posts: 352
Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 2:45 pm

Re: Dyslexia and MFW

Unread post by RachelT » Thu Apr 14, 2011 11:03 pm

Hello!!! And welcome to the MFW message board! I have not been checking in as often here lately because we have been busy, but I am happy to jump in on this thread. The message that Julie linked to was from 2009 (http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php ... 912#p49912), so let me bring you up to speed on our experiences.

We have been homeschooling for almost 5 full years now and this is our 5th year with MFW! We officially began this journey when our oldest child (son) began Kindergarten - at home! (He did attend a Christian pre-school before that.) We chose MFW for many reasons, but a lot of those reasons have still made it a great fit for our family. We have used MFW Kindergarten twice and MFW 1st grade twice (once for each child) and Adventures, ECC, and we are nearing the completion of Creation to the Greeks! It does take time each day, but I am glad that we can enjoy most subjects together and both of my children can work together in most areas of study. I still read aloud our Bible, history, science, vocabulary, literature/read alouds, and music and art history information. We do a lot of oral narration and discussion about whatever we are reading. This really helps my dyslexic child soak up all of the information, even though he could not read it all for himself, yet. In all of his testing, my son always scored "off the charts" in his verbal expression! Talking and discussing things is one area where he excels! I appreciate the way that we can bring in our Bible lessons to other subject areas and the thought that Marie has put into choosing all of the materials. The simple-hands on activities add variety to our lessons.

We have used Math U See (MUS) since we began homeschooling and we have just stuck with it. We did also use the hands-on math activities suggested in MFW Kindergarten and MFW 1st grade and the Complete Book of Math. MUS has worked very well though for both children (and their teacher).

My younger child (daughter) has done very well with the MFW recommendations for language arts that we have used. B is now in 2nd grade, but is working above her grade level in most subjects, especially reading, writing, spelling, and art. She usually is a breeze to teach! She uses PLL (Primary Language Lessons) and Spelling Power and she enjoys them both! (The total opposite of her brother!) She is also reading lots of chapter books.

J was not officially diagnosed with learning disabilities until 2nd semester of 2nd grade and he is now almost done with 4th grade. He is dyslexic, dysgraphic, and has "inattentive" ADHD (not hyperactive). We have almost always tried MFW recommendations first, but have definitely had to change things for this special learner! He is bright, but I am challenged as a teacher to find what works best for him, at times! He cannot always do what is suggested, but I can modify the lessons or assignments to make them "do-able" for him. That is the trickiest thing about teaching any student with learning challenges! As I mentioned above, we can do many of the MFW lessons together. Below are the subjects where I have had to especially make modifications:

Typing - I realized that he needed to learn to type early on and we used Typing Instructor for Kids Deluxe. J is more comfortable typing most written work now and is a fairly quick and accurate typist. This takes the dsygraphia issues (handwriting) out of the equation for assignments where he is concentrating on the process of writing or spelling.

Handwriting - He has really needed Handwriting Without Tears for very specific handwriting instruction in letter formation. He also went to Occupational Therapy for a year. I tried to just do the MFW 1st gr. copywork, but he was frustrated and we went back to HWT and have used it ever since. I also have the children work do MFW copywork, but on HWT double lined paper. My daughter is writing in beautiful, fluent cursive now, but my son still cannot remember how to form each letter, even though we have been working on it for a year. So, he is reviewing all of the letters in his HWT book right now.

Reading/Spelling - I am a happy Barton tutor, too! I am so thankful that we found the Barton Reading and Spelling System around the time that my son was diagnosed with his learning challenges. We are about halfway through Level 5 now and he is reading and spelling so many more things. We still have a few levels to go, but I am convinced that this is the very best way for him to learn to read and spell (even though he complains about it each day). Part of it's success is that it has movable letter tiles and color coding and logical rules that he can remember. Again - very specific and multi-sensory and designed for his learning style. We also have several of their stand-alone readers for controlled reading practice.

Language Arts - Although Mrs. Barton does not recommend LA and composition work until after Level 4 is completed, we went ahead and worked through PLL in 2nd and 3rd grades. A lot of it can be done orally and through discussion. ILL (Intermediate Language Lessons) has gotten more difficult for me to implement, at least with their writing lessons. They are not specific and are a jump in ability. So we do all of the oral lessons, and I modify or select the most important composition lessons. This semester, after completing Barton Level 4, we began working through Writing Strands 2. MFW recommends Writing Strands 3, but level 2 seemed more appropriate for J because it works more on sentences and their development before requiring paragraphs. To me, it seems that each assignment in WS is specific and it has worked pretty well. However, with all of this modifying, I am considering other options for Language Arts next year and I am also thinking about a multi-sensory and sequential grammar program to help teach more of how our written language is put together. I am not sure what direction we will go with these.

"Mamamary" or anyone else with more questions, please feel free to send me a private message! Overall, we love MFW, but we have to keep working with it and making it work for our own, unique students and then pull in other materials where we need to use a different approach. I am still "learning to teach" every day! :)

Re: Need help/advice/support

Postby RachelT » Fri May 27, 2011 7:27 am
Our insurance was able to cover testing because the ADHD diagnoses is considered a "medical" diagnoses, so that was really helpful. However, Susan Barton has students begin her program even if they haven't had testing if she thinks that they could benefit from her approach. There are cheaper programs, but I can say that Barton really works!

:)
Rachel, wife to Doug ~ 1995, mom to J (17) and B (15)
MFW K (twice), 1st (twice), Adv., ECC, & CtG 2006-2010,
Classical Conversations 2010-2016,
ECC/AHL 2016-17, eclectic 2017-18, WHL & US1 2018-19

http://rachelsreflections-rachelt.blogspot.com/

Amy C.
Posts: 202
Joined: Thu Apr 30, 2009 9:12 am

Please help me know what I am dealing with!

Unread post by Amy C. » Tue Sep 27, 2011 2:20 pm

My 7 year old (July birthday) has been doing MFW 1st since last year. I decided to spread it out over 2 years because of his slowness in learning. (So this is his 2nd grade year but we are doing the second half of MFW 1st). I made this decision about the middle of the year last year. He did fine with MFWK prior to this, but I questioned whether he could do the step up to 1st but decided to give it a try. He has always been delayed in his milestones (i.e. rolling over, sitting up, crawling, walking - did not walk until 18 mths. old- etc.). I was thinking because of that and because of his late birthday, I would do 1st grade over 2 years (or shorter if he picked it up quicker), hoping at some point it would click. There have been times this year that I thought he was making more progress, like last week and the week before where he did well reading (sounding out) his Bible reader, even some of the longer, harder words. Prior to this I was having serious doubts about my ability to teach him to read and his ability to learn to read. We would have some good days but more bad days than good. It did seem to be getting better this year. We started in August and I have been fairly pleased with what I thought was some progress. He seemed to not have to take quite as long to sound out words as before and was even remembering some words (granted short words, but words none the less). Last night, however, he asked me to read his baby brother a kiddy (preschool) book. I said, "Why don't you read it to him?" So he started to read it. It was awful! He could not sound out "is". The sentence started out "Is it..." He would sound it out and say "its" every time. It concerned me that he could not recognize "is" right off since we have been reading that word for the last year and a half, but then he could not even sound it out. This sentence was in the book at least 3 times, and I had him read the book twice (thinking it would get better the second time around) but he did the same thing every time (total of 6 times). He could not (and has never been able to) sound out or remember the word "on". He says "naw" (like in short o sound) or no. He still gets his b's and d's mixed up. He cannot remember one word from one sentence to the next when it is repeated. Well, when he is doing good, he can, but that is seldom. I did ask him if he was tired last night. He told me his eyes hurt and they were red. It was 8:30. I thought maybe he just needed a good night's sleep, but we are having issues this morning. He has to sound out every word (even he, his, was, is, run, mom - words that I thought by this time he would recognize, especially the more common words). And he can't remember them from one sentence to the next. He says he can't remember.

He has a hard time remembering. His reading comprehension has never been good. Up until this year, he could not answer questions about a story that I would read to him. That has improved some this year, but he still cannot retell the whole story in his own words. I have to stop about every paragraph or so and ask him questions about the few sentences I just read or he cannot remember.I have to ask him specific questions like "Who are we reading about?" What did God tell him to do?" "What happened to him?" Usually the first time he has to really think about it even though I have just read what I am asking him about. I do go over and over the story so that he can remember the important aspects of it.

Don't know if this is related but thought I would throw it out there anyway. He has never held his pencil correctly. I bought him a devise to go on his hand to help him. He used it for a brief time but never liked it and then refused to wear it. At this point I didn't care how he held his pencil. I was too worn out with it. Now he pretty much holds the pencil with the correct fingers but it points forward instead of back resting on his hand between his thumb and pointer finger. I remind him to pull his pencil back. I wouldn't worry about it so much if he could write neatly that way, but he starts getting sloppy the further forward it points. He is using the muscles on the underside of his writing hand instead of the top part (when his hand is resting on the paper and he is writing). I can see them working. For the most part, his handwriting is neat. I just have to remind him.

He has never been able (or willing) to obey well. I have to tell him things multiple times and many times having to end up yelling at him for him to do what I am telling. And if I tell him to not do something...Do not touch that, it is hot. He MUST touch it to see if I am telling the truth. I mean seriously, immediately after telling him specifically not to. I have wondered how much of this is behavior or part of a bigger problem.


I am about to the end of my rope. I don't know what to do. Is this dyslexia? I've researched dyslexia on the net. Some of the symptoms seem to fit and then others don't. I have considered getting him tested through the school, but thought we would wait this year and see if things improved. My dh has talked with a few school officials (past and current - relatives and others that he knows well), even the man who is over the learning disability/special education. He doesn't actually work with the children. He oversees the district. My dh understood him to say that because of ps funding cuts that it would cost us $500 to get him tested. He did offer to give us info on dyslexia, but said that if I had been researching it that I probably knew everything that the info would give me. He said that we could call him anytime to talk to him. I don't think he was trying to blow us off because we hs. He is a super nice guy. We know him. I have held off because #1 the cost #2 I was wanting to give him one more year to see if things picked up #3 Having to do with #2, I did not want to give him a label if it was just that he was delayed and would improve this year. But I am absolutely at my wit's end and starting to feel that it is more than just being delayed.

Oh, one more thing...he can memorize well. For instance, he memorizes his Awana verses well and knows his OT & NT books of the Bible. This just really picked up within the last 6 months.

Can anyone help me know what I am dealing with or what it sounds like I might be dealing with? Should I get him tested? My husband knows a teacher who he is thinking about calling that his uncle (former superintendent of ed) told him about...said that she was extremely knowledgeable about dyslexia. Is that what you think we are dealing with? Feel free to ask me any questions I might have missed.

Thanks in advance for ANY insight you can give me!!!
Amy C.

Caryn
Posts: 26
Joined: Mon Mar 09, 2009 4:12 pm
Location: MA
Contact:

Please help me know what I am dealing with!

Unread post by Caryn » Tue Sep 27, 2011 2:29 pm

Amy C. wrote:My 7 year old (July birthday) has been doing MFW 1st since last year. I decided to spread it out over 2 years because of his slowness in learning. (So this is his 2nd grade year but we are doing the second half of MFW 1st). I made this decision about the middle of the year last year. He did fine with MFWK prior to this, but I questioned whether he could do the step up to 1st but decided to give it a try. He has always been delayed in his milestones (i.e. rolling over, sitting up, crawling, walking - did not walk until 18 mths. old- etc.). I was thinking because of that and because of his late birthday, I would do 1st grade over 2 years (or shorter if he picked it up quicker), hoping at some point it would click.

We started in August and I have been fairly pleased with what I thought was some progress. He seemed to not have to take quite as long to sound out words as before and was even remembering some short words. Last night, however, he asked me to read his baby brother a kiddy (preschool) book. I said, "Why don't you read it to him?" So he started to read it. It was awful! He could not sound out "is". The sentence started out "Is it..." He would sound it out and say "its" every time. It concerned me that he could not recognize "is" right off since we have been reading that word for the last year and a half, but then he could not even sound it out. This sentence was in the book at least 3 times, and I had him read the book twice (thinking it would get better) but he did the same thing every time. He could not (and has never been able to) sound out or remember the word "on". He says "naw" (like in short o sound) or no. He still gets his b's and d's mixed up. He cannot remember one word from one sentence to the next when it is repeated. Well, when he is doing good, he can, but that is seldom.

I did ask him if he was tired last night. He told me his eyes hurt and they were red. It was 8:30. I thought maybe he just needed a good night's sleep, but we are having issues this morning. He has to sound out every word (even he, his, was, is, run, mom - words that I thought by this time he would recognize, especially the more common words). And he can't remember them from one sentence to the next. He says he can't remember.

He has a hard time remembering. His reading comprehension has never been good. Up until this year, he could not answer questions about a story that I would read to him. That has improved some this year, but he still cannot retell the whole story in his own words. I have to stop about every paragraph or so and ask him specific questions like "Who are we reading about?" What did God tell him to do?" "What happened to him?" Usually the first time he has to really think about it even though I have just read what I am asking him about. I do go over and over the story so that he can remember the important aspects of it.

Don't know if this is related but thought I would throw it out there anyway. He has never held his pencil correctly. It points forward instead of back resting on his hand between his thumb and pointer finger. I remind him to pull his pencil back. He starts getting sloppy the further forward it points. He is using the muscles on the underside of his writing hand instead of the top part (when his hand is resting on the paper and he is writing).

He has never been able (or willing) to obey well. I have to tell him things multiple times and if I tell him to not do something...Do not touch that, it is hot. He MUST touch it to see if I am telling the truth. I have wondered how much of this is behavior or part of a bigger problem.

I am about to the end of my rope. I don't know what to do. Is this dyslexia? I've researched dyslexia on the net. Some of the symptoms seem to fit and then others don't. I have considered getting him tested through the school, but thought we would wait this year and see if things improved. Because of ps funding cuts that it would cost us $500 to get him tested. I have held off because #1 the cost #2 I was wanting to give him one more year to see if things picked up #3 Having to do with #2, I did not want to give him a label if it was just that he was delayed and would improve this year. But I am starting to feel that it is more than just being delayed.

Oh, one more thing...he can memorize well. For instance, he memorizes his Awana verses well and knows his OT & NT books of the Bible. This just really picked up within the last 6 months.

Can anyone help me know what I am dealing with or what it sounds like I might be dealing with? Should I get him tested? Feel free to ask me any questions I might have missed. Thanks in advance for ANY insight you can give me!!!
Amy C.
Amy, I'm still on the road to answers myself, but just to let you know that we have some challenges as well. Rather than flounder and feel like I'm drowning, I'm taking my guy for a developmental assessment at Children's Hospital. If they can point out some developmental issues (anything from dyslexia to auditory processing issues and tons more) and guide me as to how to work through them, I'll be happy. If they say, this kid is perfectly fine, you just need to be patient, I'll be thrilled.

Go with your mother's instinct on this one. I had people telling me "Every child develops at a different rate" and while that's true, I just knew it wasn't the source of our issues.

And hang in there - ask the Lord for wisdom, and in the end, it'll all work out :)

Praying,
Caryn
Caryn
==============================================
dd9, ds8, and ds3 (Speech therapy and pre-k)
Pre-k (twice), K (twice), 1st (twice), Adventures, ECC and currently CtG
My blog: Considering Wildflowers

TriciaMR
Posts: 999
Joined: Thu Sep 20, 2007 11:43 am

Re: Please help me know what I am dealing with!

Unread post by TriciaMR » Tue Sep 27, 2011 2:59 pm

Amy,

I'm guessing one of two things (maybe both)...

1. Dyslexia. Some of your symptoms match, some don't.

2. Some kind of auditory processing issue. I have a friend whose son can't filter out common background noises - even the hum of florescent lights. She got him tested and they made some kind of special filter (like a hearing aid) to wear that filters out the frequency that seems to interfere with his ability to listen. Her son sounds a lot like yours: not able to listen to instructions (go get your shoes and coat, but he goes and gets his glasses). He is doing much better now, and even recognizes if there is too much background noise for him if he's not wearing his filter, and will try to go some place quieter.

My two dyslexic kids actually do quite well memorizing their AWANA verses. My oldest is now reading well, but I still record verses on my computer for her to listen to on her MP3 player as she follows along (and now that Sparkies come with CD's, I rip the verses and copying them to my boys' MP3 players as well). I always thought it was funny that my kids can memorize their AWANA verses but struggle with some Auditory issues, too. (I've never had them diagnosed.) I wonder if it si because it is God's word...

-Trish
Trish - Wife to Phil, Mom to Toni(18), Charlie(14), and Trent(14)
2014-2015 - AHL, CTG
2015-2016 - WHL, RTR
2016-2017 - EXP1850, US1877
2017-2018 - DE, 1850MOD
2018-2019 - College, AHL
My blog

Amy C.
Posts: 202
Joined: Thu Apr 30, 2009 9:12 am

Re: Please help me know what I am dealing with!

Unread post by Amy C. » Tue Sep 27, 2011 3:05 pm

Thanks!

I just wanted to say that he just read his Bible reader to me (A Baby in a Basket) and did sooooo much better! Even reading the longer and harder words, sounding them out very well. This is what baffles me....how he can do so well for a day or two and then the next day it is like he totally forgets what he has learned.

I did fail to mention that when we get to a word, I can say this has the long o sound or this has a silent e or this has a short i sound or this letter is a changer and changes the g sound, whatever I think he may have difficulty with and he then can (most of the time) sound it out. So for the most part he knows his phonics rules or the sound long and short make to be able to sound it out. I just thought I would mention this in case it is helpful.

Amy C.

Caryn
Posts: 26
Joined: Mon Mar 09, 2009 4:12 pm
Location: MA
Contact:

Re: Please help me know what I am dealing with!

Unread post by Caryn » Tue Sep 27, 2011 3:17 pm

Amy, I was going to say what Trish said with the dyslexia and auditory processing because that is what I was thinking, but I'm not qualified at all and would definitely recommend getting him evaluated.

Another thing that comes to mind is apraxia but I'm not sure what it's called when it comes to reading. There's a different name, with a similar concept.

Actually, my "knowledge" (super limited and not really knowledge but just what I've learned since I've had to go down this road as a mom) started with my then 2 year old's speech delay. The speech therapist started talking about things that made me say, "Hey! That's my older son too!" So I'm just in the process of making appointments for my 8 year old to be evaluated for auditory processing issues.

The fantastic thing is that with speech therapy with my little guy, he's come leaps and bounds and is a different kid. I expect the same for my 8 yr old (reading at a 1st grade level and has a very hard time processing conversations and instructions. Often says things that make me wonder what "world" he's living in because I have no idea what he's on about) since I have heard so many great reports from other home schoolers who have gone for help with auditory/dyslexia etc issues.

It's amazing how once we realize that there's something that needs developing, go get the assessment and go get the therapy, we see a different child :) It's a long road sometimes, but at least it's a road and you're not floundering frustrated wondering what's going on!
Caryn
==============================================
dd9, ds8, and ds3 (Speech therapy and pre-k)
Pre-k (twice), K (twice), 1st (twice), Adventures, ECC and currently CtG
My blog: Considering Wildflowers

Amy C.
Posts: 202
Joined: Thu Apr 30, 2009 9:12 am

Re: Please help me know what I am dealing with!

Unread post by Amy C. » Tue Sep 27, 2011 3:34 pm

Thanks, Caryn! I just wanted to say that he just read his Bible reader to me (A Baby in a Basket) and did sooooo much better! Even reading the longer and harder words, sounding them out very well. This is what baffles me....how he can do so well for a day or two and then the next day it is like he totally forgets what he has learned.

I did fail to mention that when we get to a word, I can say this has the long o sound or this has a silent e or this has a short i sound or this letter is a changer and changes the g sound, whatever I think he may have difficulty with and he then can (most of the time) sound it out. So for the most part he knows his phonics rules or the sound long and short make to be able to sound it out. I just thought I would mention this in case it is helpful.



Thanks, Trish. I have wondered about the auditory processing thing. He is very easily distracted by other noises.

I have wondered about vision problems (not caught at a opthamologist visit) like tracking problems. Sometimes he doesn't seem to be focusing with his eyes. It is strange because I can just tell something is not right. He doesn't look like he is zeroing in on the word. He was prescribed glasses for astigmatism in July, but the doc said it was mostly for him to get used to them, that he would eventually have to wear them, but these pair were to get use to. He does not want to wear them. I do try to get him to wear them some, and on the days he really seems to be having trouble focusing and complains of his eyes hurting while reading, I will have him put them on. That is another struggle. I love this child dearly and know God has a plan for his life but he. wears. me. out!

I pray quite earnestly for him and me (mostly me in how to deal with him). That is the thing. I have prayed and prayed about what to do. On one hand it seemed the answer was clear when out of the blue my dh's uncle showed up at his workplace to talk business and the discussion of dyslexia and our concerns about this child came up in conversation. But then my ds started improving and others were encouraging me that he would get it (even discussed it a little with my pediatrician), that some kids just take longer, so I decided to wait. Then, last night the reading episode happened. Funny....my husband was gone to a scout thing with my older two last night and talked with two mothers (both work in the school system...one is a friend of ours). It came up in conversation...you know, how is hs'ing going. So, my dh mentions our concerns. Both women assure him that they see kids in the school system all the time who it just takes longer for. Both say (one works with special ed kids) to just hang in there and don't give up that he will eventually get it if we just keep working with him. This conversation is going on about the time I am having this reading problem with ds last night.

So....what to do? Wait or be proactive and seek testing. I don't know that we can afford testing, depending on what all would be involved. Of course, if it is absolutely necessary and needful we would try to do what it took to get answers and help, but I am just not sure.... It can be agonizing really!

Amy C.

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