Special Needs - Teaching & resources for specific needs

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rebeccal2002
Posts: 59
Joined: Sat Jan 22, 2011 3:00 pm

Re: Please help me know what I am dealing with!

Unread post by rebeccal2002 » Tue Sep 27, 2011 4:18 pm

Hugs Amy,

I could has written most of your post. My son, now 7, 8 in Jan, is taking his time "getting it" too. I'm trying not to freak out with him because he is still learning to read. We are on day 91 and he still has to sound things out. And I still have to remind him of rules to vowel sounds, etc. But then he can usually make the adjustment and "get" the word. He tries to guess what the word should say and sometimes I find him "reading" while looking at the wall. I tell him to, "look at the words, sound it out from the beginning." Now, my son very well may be dyslexic, or he might just not be "getting it." After 2 girls that literally taught themselves to read before we could, this whole situation with him is surprising. But I hear that some (boys especially) take longer to sort it out. We've been at learning to read for about 2 years now. I should mention that I have seen improvement since starting MFW 1. Even though he's not reading how I think he should, he still is improving. Some days are great, he reads so well that I am very impressed, he feels great, we Hi-Five. Then other days he really struggles. These are all just random thoughts, not to whine at you at all, but to encourage you somehow that you're not alone in the struggle. :) I have the niggling in the back of my mind about dyslexia because there is dyslexia and lefthandedness in the family (they can be related but not absolute), his grandfather didn't learn to read until he was 10 (he's a lefty and says he's dyslexic, but never tested) his aunt is dyslexic and his brother (just 2 yo) is left handed. I'm trying not to assume anything but it's hard not to.

It's hard to tell you what to do. I think you are not wrong to get him evaluated and not wrong to wait. I think the main thing is for you and your DH to prayerfully consider and agree on a course of action, no matter what that action (or non-action) might be.

HTH,

Rebecca
HS'ing since 2006, MFW since 01/2011 :)
2015/16: ECC (2nd time around w/ 3rd, 6th and 8.5 grader), WHL (10th). Also 2nd half of K and 1st for 6 year old.

Finished K, 1st, ECC, CTG, RTR, Exp-1850, 1850-MOD, AHL

and 4 year old helping!

jasntas
Posts: 469
Joined: Sun Apr 26, 2009 6:10 pm

Re: Please help me know what I am dealing with!

Unread post by jasntas » Tue Sep 27, 2011 4:22 pm

First (((hugs)))

I took so long to write this that I see now that there are other posts, so I apologize if it repeats or contradicts.

I cannot tell you if it is dyslexia or not as I am no expert but I do have two that are, well at least one that has been 'officially' diagnosed. They are both like night and day so I did not suspect my dd and kept telling myself she's just a little behind but she'll catch up. I've finally come to the conclusion that she is as well and since I already have the materials (the Barton Program) I am teaching it to her as well.

Anyway, your ds sounds almost exactly like my ds (the one that has been diagnosed). Now my ds may have other issues such as ADD but he's only been tested for dyslexia and dysgraphia specifically.

He also has an odd pencil grip and refuses to use anything to help him. He also presses very hard on his paper. One of the reasons I have him do a lot of things on a personal white board. That helps. He also hates to make a mistake and have to erase so it helps with that, too. This is his dysgraphia.

I don't know if this is his dyslexia or what but my ds is the same way about my not telling him to do something and his doing it anyway. I believe he does it to see if it's true or somehow understand why. IDK. He also can't remember what it was that I send him after. I could say, "Go get your socks" and he will come back with a shirt. I will make sure he is looking at me and repeats the command back to me before he goes to do whatever it was I told him to do. That helps.

I do know that dyslexic traits include saying words backwards such as 'saw' for 'was' or in your case 'naw' for 'on'. I would think that to him, 'on' is probably the opposite of 'naw'. Both of my dc do that A LOT. I don't know all the technicals on that but it has something to do with the fact that they know what letters are there they just can't get it out in the right order. My ds could also not remember the word or words from a previous sentence that he had just read but my dd could. Go figure.

It is a weird thing with them on the 'some days it clicks and some days it doesn't' thing. That is also a dyslexic trait and, again my dc do that as well.

My ds would frequently get headaches during 'school time' or any time when reading or writing. It was all the stress he was under to try and read or write. He has been getting better as he is now learning in a different order that is not traditional but works for him. We also break things up during the day. Not a lot of writing or reading at one time but at different times throughout the day, for instance.

My ds has always had an excellent memory 'if' he is interested in the subject. If not, he seems not to hear a word I say. One thing that helps him is to draw or color or paint with watercolors or whatever while I'm reading. I don't know how but it does help.

Dyslexia testing is very expensive and is not covered by insurance (in CA and most other states) but we were very fortunate that a relative (not my mom for others who know THAT situation) paid for it. I felt so relieved with a diagnosis. It helped me to be able to say he 'is' dyslexic, not just I self diagnosed and I 'believe' he is dyslexic. I then knew that I was doing the right things with the way I was teaching him. I also was able to obtain tools to help me in teaching him better.

If you wanted, you could start with an evaluation through your Dr. for things like ADD and such to confirm or rule those out. They are usually covered under insurances.

Have you seen the warning signs page on the Barton web site? http://bartonreading.com/pdf/Dys%20warning%20signs.pdf
They are only supposed to have 3 or more symptoms for you to suspect dyslexia. My dd didn't match 'any' of the preschool signs but my ds did. He 'just' learned to tie his shoes about two weeks ago. &) And we tried for 'years'. It's a left/right confusion thing. But my dd learned when she was 5. She only has about 3 of the signs for the elementary age but those signs are severe. On the other hand, my ds is like a poster child for dyslexia. :(

Oh, and my ds is sooo proud that he is dyslexic. He was actually relieved to find out there was a reason for his struggles and that there was a way to help him. Then he was excited to find out about all the famous people who are or were believed to be dyslexic. If you do an internet search you will find many, many famous people on that list. Einstein is one. Tom Cruise is actually another. A lot of doctors, scientists, preachers, politicians, actors, etc. are/were dyslexic. They are usually out of the box thinkers and problem solvers. It's just not easy to get them to that point in their lives. I know.

I don't know if this is helpful or more confusing. I will pray that you find clarity and peace in all of this.
Tammie - Wife to James for 27 years
Mom to Justin (15) and Carissa (12)
ADV & K 2009-2010 . . . RTR (again) & WHL 2016-2017
http://tammiestime.blogspot.com/
The days of a mother are long but the years are short.

MelissaM
Posts: 161
Joined: Tue Aug 31, 2010 12:52 pm

Re: Please help me know what I am dealing with!

Unread post by MelissaM » Tue Sep 27, 2011 4:40 pm

Just want to give you (((HUGS))). Some of it sounds similar to my 1st grader, and some doesn't. (Mine will be 7 in July.)

Some of it sounds similar to my 2yo and gives me some things to be on the lookout for as he gets older. (He's also got a lot of motor delays - didn't walk till 19 mos, etc. - and speech delayed.) Some things I've done for him that you could consider if you haven't already: he had a motor skills evaluation and then a speech eval and a hearing eval. His hearing (so far) is fine, but he does qualify for PT and ST. He's been getting the PT for a while, but we just recently had the Speech eval done, so he hasn't started that yet. He's going for a pediatric neurology eval in a month or so. I'm really not sure why or what they might be looking for. I sort of don't want to know until I have to.

The person who did the speech eval did say that a lot of times kids who have trouble with motor skills or speech and language development have a harder time with their early schooling - learning to read and write.

I don't have any answers. Just (((HUGS))). And prayers.
:)
Melissa
DD13
DS10
DS5
DS2

Amy C.
Posts: 202
Joined: Thu Apr 30, 2009 9:12 am

Re: Please help me know what I am dealing with!

Unread post by Amy C. » Tue Sep 27, 2011 5:03 pm

Thanks, Tammie. You know you said your ds was so glad to find out that he had dyslexia. It reminded me that a couple of weeks ago I was ordering my ds some books online. He was sitting beside me looking at what I was ordering, and he said, "I can't believe I am 7 and can't read." It broke my heart. I just never knew it bothered him. He is my clown and acts silly and immature most of the time. He is very rarely serious. It really floored me!

Rebecca, interesting about dyslexia and left-handedness connection. My dh is left handed. Well, he does some things with left hand and other things with right hand. My 2nd son is the same way, but he does the opposite things of his dad with right hand and left hand. My dh said that growing up as a young boy, he was thought to be dyslexic because he read some words backwards. At some point, "they" (I think the school staff) decided he wasn't. I don't know what they determined that on. I am sure testing and diagnosing has improved over time. I am not saying that dh is dyslexic. It is just something to ponder/consider when dealing with this current problem with our son.

I did not have any problem with my 1st two dss learning to read. Now at ages 12 and 10, they are avid readers. I guess this is one reason this is so hard to navigate.

Melissa, I just wanted to say that he does have a hard time hearing sounds of words. He often says words wrong because he truly thinks they sound that way. I guess that is the way he has been hearing them all this time. I knew that he did this some and would correct him but it is even more obvious now that we are sounding out words phonetically. He has said many times, "I thought it was ________". I am having to correct that as we go.

He was speech delayed as well. I even mentioned it to my pediatrician at the time. He said to wait until he went to preschool. He thought that he would pick it up when around other kids his age, hearing them talk and wanting to join in. He said that if that did not happen then we would need to look into it further. He did not go to preschool and he did pick it up but much later than normal.

Thank you all for your thoughts. Your prayers would be much appreciated as we try to do what is best for our son.
Amy C.

MelissaM
Posts: 161
Joined: Tue Aug 31, 2010 12:52 pm

Re: Please help me know what I am dealing with!

Unread post by MelissaM » Tue Sep 27, 2011 7:36 pm

*nodding head* My 1st grader hears words....uh...differently, too. He always thought drum started with a g, like giraffe. He was surprised. I haven't seen it happen too many times, but it was interesting because *I* didn't notice him saying them wrong. (He does have speech issues - had a couple years of speech and might be looking at more, but on the words that he has said he thought were spelled differently I didn't notice him saying them wrong. Wow - great sentence. I'll come back later when I can be coherent.

...Okay, I've read back through and I guess I don't really have anything more to add right now except some more (((HUGS))).

I did want to say though that my 1st grader will be 7 in JANUARY not July. Yes, I do know my children's birthdays. I'm a good mom, honest. ;)

Fwiw, my husband is mildly dyslexic so I'm always on the lookout for signs and symptoms. I don't know - my 1st grader still doesn't at this point seem to have very many of the markers, but my eyes are definitely on the 2yo.

Okay, I'll really stop talking now - one more (HUG).
:)
Melissa
DD13
DS10
DS5
DS2

TriciaMR
Posts: 999
Joined: Thu Sep 20, 2007 11:43 am

Re: Please help me know what I am dealing with!

Unread post by TriciaMR » Tue Sep 27, 2011 9:49 pm

Amy,

In regards to some saying, "Some kids just take longer." I would reword that to, "Some kids just need more practice. A LOT more practice. More practice than you would think possible."

One thing I feel strongly about with my two that I'm pretty sure are mildly dyslexic is that they just need a lot more practice and review than non-dyslexics. So, review and review and review the rules, vowel teams, consonant teams, changers, etc, as much as possible. One thing I did was read ahead in the Bible reader and look for words I thought he might have trouble with. I would write them on the whiteboard and then I would have him try to read them. I would show him how to break them down by syllable, or remind him of soft-g or soft-c, or how silent-e makes the vowel long, etc. That was always a good help for him, too.

-Trish
Trish - Wife to Phil, Mom to Toni(18), Charlie(14), and Trent(14)
2014-2015 - AHL, CTG
2015-2016 - WHL, RTR
2016-2017 - EXP1850, US1877
2017-2018 - DE, 1850MOD
2018-2019 - College, AHL
My blog

donutmom
Posts: 67
Joined: Tue Nov 21, 2006 5:41 am

Vision Therapy?

Unread post by donutmom » Mon Jul 30, 2012 11:05 am

homespun wrote:Has anyone heard of it? When my ds was sitting here with tears in his eyes because he hates to think of school starting soon, I decided to take my dc to a special eye doctor I had been hearing about, to see if there were some problems I was not aware of. Sure enough. They have 20/20 vision but lots of focusing problems. That is why dd has headaches, hates math and writing and cant spell worth a hoot. That is why ds has trouble flipping letters, words, skipping words, lines, etc. He also hates math, writing and such. Now Im waiting to see if my insurance will cover therapy. Otherwise reading glasses will help but not solve the problem. It is something they will not outgrow.
Absolutely have heard of it. . . and it can have amazing results. Most of vision therapy (that I'm familiar with) involves exercises (eye) to do at home on a daily basis. Not difficult exercises. Some work one eye at a time, some together. Consistency is a key, though.

As an example, my hubby's cousin struggled through school--with many of the same things as your son. She also has 20/20 vision. Finally in high school she was diagnosed with focusing issues and given vision therapy. She had the exercises to do, and also wore glasses for a period of time. Made a world of difference! Reading was no longer a struggle, as were other school related tasks. She also didn't need the glasses permanently. I remember her parents saying, "We just thought she was a bad reader." They were so happy, but wished they had known about this earlier. Now, in their defense, this was many moons ago, and things (such as earlier diagnosing) have come a long way in the past 15 or so years!

Even if your insurance doesn't cover it, I'd try to find a way to do it. It will be worth it. Perhaps your dr. will be willing to work with you (discount for cash payments or something). I don't know how often your child would have to actually be seen by a doctor. It's not like physical therapy, where you go to see someone for every session. Rather, you do the exercises at home after the doctor shows you. So perhaps it's not as expensive as it may seem??? Maybe?? (I have no clue--and since it seems all things medical these days cost a mint. . . . . !!).

Now so you know that I'm not speaking as just "someone who knows someone" who did vision therapy and it helped, in my previous life (you know the one before children appeared), I was an optician. So there's a bit of knowledge in this noggin of mine. No, it may not always appear to be the case, and yes, I've forgotten much more than I remember (not by choice, of course! Age??!! ;) ). Maybe experience would be a better word than knowledge! But the point is, I've seen vision therapy work. Hope that helps.

--dee

Mississippi Jenni
Posts: 5
Joined: Mon Aug 06, 2007 6:48 am

Re: Vision Therapy?

Unread post by Mississippi Jenni » Tue Jul 31, 2012 7:40 am

Sometimes children needing vt are misdiagnosed with dyslexia. Ds was having headaches and we could not work for more then five minutes. The tech at the eye dr. accused him of lying when he had trouble reading the eye chart. Dr. said he had perfect vision. A friend of ours did vt so we decided to check into it. They worked with us so we could pay what we could aford.

Ds has tracking issues, main problem, and a few other problems. We have seen progress.

Ds also had trouble sleeping. VT helped. It all works together.

We had a hard time schooling last year and lost the whole year. I wish that I could have put it together sooner. We are going to take school easy and get the basics done. We will be using ECC this year.

Ds gets math, so that has never been a problem. We sturggled with reading. He is now getting excited about reading. He reads to the cat.

We also realized that dh has the same vision porblems. The problem does not go away, but they find ways to adapt. There are tricks they learn to get their vision clear. Dh is still not a good reader.. He is doing therapy at night with ds. After we are done with therapy we may have dh seen. I am not sure that they will work with us like they worked with us for ds.

VT is worth the time and expense.

Where are you from. If you are reasonably close to Birmingham, Al check out Snider Therapy.

NJCheryl
Posts: 78
Joined: Wed Sep 09, 2009 12:08 pm

Re: Vision Therapy?

Unread post by NJCheryl » Tue Jul 31, 2012 1:13 pm

My 8 year old nephew is in vision therapy right now. He is homeschooled by my sister- in law who is also a special education teacher in the public school system. He had lazy eye when he was younger and went through the patching, the surgery - all of that. He just completed 2nd grade and he was still struggling to read and to do his math. After hearing a speaker about the subject she took him for an evaluation with the vision therapist and they discovered the problem. His eyes were working independent of each other, so he was actually seeing double - this is why he had trouble with reading and math. He has been in vision therapy for about 6 months and ids doing so much better. It is hard work, and expensive - insurance doesn't cover the weekly sessions and they also had to buy a software program for him to do his homework, but it has been worth it. He used to get so frustrated with his school work, and this has helped tremendously. I would definitely say go for it.

MelissaB
Posts: 369
Joined: Sun May 09, 2010 10:01 pm

Re: Vision Therapy?

Unread post by MelissaB » Tue Jul 31, 2012 7:55 pm

Absolutely heard of it... My friend's 8 yr. old son is doing vision therapy - fun games at home using a balance board, a ball and other fun stuff. He started last summer, and his focus and reading have greatly improved.

Go for it! :-)
Melissa B. (Arkansas)
Girls ages 16 & 13
Completed K, 1st, and Investigate {ECC; CTG; RTR; Expl.-1850; and 1850-Mod. Times}
"That they may teach the young women to be sober, to love their husbands, to love their children,.." Titus 2:4

homespun
Posts: 12
Joined: Sat Apr 28, 2012 2:18 pm

Re: Vision Therapy?

Unread post by homespun » Tue Jul 31, 2012 8:52 pm

Thanks everyone. Its seems like all those that I have talked to so far have seen positive results. Im so glad we found out now. I have enjoyed MFW so much and learned alot myself. I want my kids to have happy memories too. They do enjoy the history part of school.
MFW user since 2006 beginning in K. Doing ECC synergy group this year for our second time with ECC.
dd grade 8, ds grade 6

TriciaMR
Posts: 999
Joined: Thu Sep 20, 2007 11:43 am

testing for Dyslexia & Dysgraphia

Unread post by TriciaMR » Tue Jun 18, 2013 11:10 am

C4Car wrote:This board has been amazing for support and advice to me concerning my dyslexic son. We are considering having him tested for dyslexia and dysgraphia. He is 9 yrs. old. Not sure where to begin in this journey. Have any of you been on this road before? Who do we contact? What "titles" should a qualified doctor/psychologists have? Will the fact that we homeschool have any bearing or consequences with these tests? or rather do we need to find "homeschool friendly" psychologists? Were the tests stressful for your children? Oh, so many questions! Thanks Greatly, Christie
You might start here: http://www.interdys.org/

And then see if your state has an organization. Our state has a branch, and they have lists of people who do diagnosis and such, conferences, etc.

For us, my kids dyslexia hasn't been that bad and I see them making great strides. I have not have them formally tested. I think I would ask any tester, though, if they do support homeschooling families and would be willing to work with them.

It can be expensive to have testing. You could see if your doctor can refer someone. Sometimes if you can get a doctor referral, then insurance will cover *some* of the cost. Some states cover the cost for any school-age kids. So like I said, see if the international dyslexia organization has a state or area branch and then get info from them.

Also check at your local university/colleges - they may offer "supervised" testing - where someone getting the masters degree does the testing while supervised by the professor. This gives them practice on real patients and is usually much less expensive than other testing.
C4Car wrote:Thank you! Trish you are always so helpful.
Trish - Wife to Phil, Mom to Toni(18), Charlie(14), and Trent(14)
2014-2015 - AHL, CTG
2015-2016 - WHL, RTR
2016-2017 - EXP1850, US1877
2017-2018 - DE, 1850MOD
2018-2019 - College, AHL
My blog

jasntas
Posts: 469
Joined: Sun Apr 26, 2009 6:10 pm

Letter Blending - Dyslexia?

Unread post by jasntas » Fri Jul 26, 2013 12:37 pm

gratitude wrote:True dyslexia would read the blend backwards:
For example 'ba' would become 'ab'
Not exactly. A true dyslexic doesn't actually see things backwards. It's usually in the longer words and syllables that they will mix up the letters. They do frequently have directional confusions such as mixing up the letters b and d when reading or writing and frequently have difficulty knowing their left from their right. They will also insert words that do not belong or just leave out words or even substitute words when reading. These are just a few of the symptoms.

Anyway, my intent is not to push anyone into thinking their child is dyslexic but I believe it is better to rule it out early rather than wait until they are behind. For most kids, they only need a little more time to let it 'sink in' but for kids with dyslexia they need special training and extra time to help them learn. They are very capable of learning but it is a very slow process and the sooner the parent/teacher intervenes, the better, in my humble opinion.
Tammie - Wife to James for 27 years
Mom to Justin (15) and Carissa (12)
ADV & K 2009-2010 . . . RTR (again) & WHL 2016-2017
http://tammiestime.blogspot.com/
The days of a mother are long but the years are short.

Mom2theteam
Posts: 184
Joined: Thu Nov 11, 2010 12:33 pm

Re: Letter Blending - Dyslexia?

Unread post by Mom2theteam » Fri Jul 26, 2013 1:39 pm

jasntas wrote:Not exactly. A true dyslexic doesn't actually see things backwards. It's usually in the longer words and syllables that they will mix up the letters. They do frequently have directional confusions such as mixing up the letters b and d when reading or writing and frequently have difficulty knowing their left from their right. They will also insert words that do not belong or just leave out words or even substitute words when reading. These are just a few of the symptoms.
Interesting. That describes me...I had more than one teacher in school suggest that I might have it, but I was never tested. I never struggled enough, I guess. The last teacher I remember mentioning it was in 7th grade. She asked if I was ever tested for it. Obviously, for me, I managed. Maybe I have it, maybe I don't. Who knows and who even cares at this point...I read and enjoy it. :-)

Of course, I'm NOT saying testing isn't important at all! I'm sure their are degrees to which is hinders learning and if I have it, clearly it would be considered mild. I'm just making an observation about myself. ;)

ETA - Well, gee...I just looked online to find a list of symptoms for dyslexia...I have almost every single one out of 25 total for categories of reading, spelling and speech. Very interesting......I managed even though I do know I really struggle with oral reading still. I am getting better because I have to do it all the time now, but I don't like to and I do read the wrong words all the time. Until now, it hardly mattered, but now Zack can look over my shoulder and correct me. LOL!! Maybe he should read to us! Just looked at a site with adult symptoms and I fit that too....strangely interesting....
TriciaMR wrote:Heather, My dh, dad and brother are all dyslexic... They've all been successful and adapted in various ways. I think it often depends on the severity.
I'm sure it depends on the severity. I'm sure if I struggled more than I did, my mom would have realized and gotten me help as a child. Interesting, I have several family members (all boys) with various LD's including dyslexia and ADHD. So, it really wouldn't surprise me.

At this point, it doesn't really matter. But, part of me would like to know for sure. It would explain a lot of things. As I look at the list of symptoms for adults, it includes things like not liking to speak in a front of a group and having a hard time estimating how long it takes to complete a task. Both of those (along with many others) definitely fit me. I don't have a speech stutter when I talk, but I stutter over my words constantly...if that makes sense...I often can't think of what I'm trying to say and it drives me batty and makes me feel silly and embarrassed. So, if I were to know for sure, it might help.

As I said though, at this point, it doesn't matter and I don't have the time, energy or money to invest in figuring it out just for my own validation. I am who God made me no matter what label I may or may not wear. :-)
Last edited by Mom2theteam on Fri Jul 26, 2013 1:49 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Heather
Wife to an amazing man
Mom to 6, ages 10, 7, 7, 5, 5, 3
Zack, 10 CtG
Samantha & Blake, twins, 7, CtG
Matthew & Joshua, twins, 5, MFW K
Nicholas, 3 derailing and tagging along

jasntas
Posts: 469
Joined: Sun Apr 26, 2009 6:10 pm

Re: Letter Blending - Dyslexia?

Unread post by jasntas » Fri Jul 26, 2013 3:15 pm

Mom2theteam wrote:
TriciaMR wrote:Heather, My dh, dad and brother are all dyslexic... They've all been successful and adapted in various ways. I think it often depends on the severity.
I'm sure it depends on the severity. I'm sure if I struggled more than I did my mom would have realized and gotten me help as a child. Interesting, I have several family members (all boys) with various LD's including dyslexia and ADHD. So, it really wouldn't surprise me.
Yes, many people are able to cope and find ways around learning when they are dyslexic. And everyone is different with different varying degrees of dyslexia.

My dh is dyslexic as well and he is a pastor. He struggles many times with the 'written portion' of his profession but speaks well in front of others and is a people person for sure so he compensates well in other areas. But he still spells very poorly and has difficulty reading words he is not familiar with. He so wishes he knew the skills our kids are learning. I do teach him things here and there that really help him to improve his reading and spelling.

I feel it is important that a person with dyslexia gets the right kind of training if possible so that not only will they have confidence in the areas they are naturally strong in but they can also feel confident in the areas they struggle with as well. We live in a society where the written word is essential so reading and writing well are much needed tools that can help us to not only succeed but to excel.

I'll climb off my soap box now. I hope and pray I do not offend anyone with my passion for this subject. :~ I guess I feel so passionately about this subject because I live in a house where everyone around me struggles in this area and I try to do everything in my power to help them to feel confident and to succeed. :)
Tammie - Wife to James for 27 years
Mom to Justin (15) and Carissa (12)
ADV & K 2009-2010 . . . RTR (again) & WHL 2016-2017
http://tammiestime.blogspot.com/
The days of a mother are long but the years are short.

yvonneh
Posts: 18
Joined: Mon Feb 25, 2013 4:54 pm

Re: Letter Blending - Dyslexia?

Unread post by yvonneh » Sat Jul 27, 2013 9:31 am

Also, one of the hallmarks of dyslexia is that the person has an average to above average intelligence level. That is why none of my dd's teachers would believe me when I said I thought something was wrong with her reading. She was doing "too well." It showed up in a standardized test she took when I put her in private Christian school. She was above average in almost every category but reading. In her phonemic awarenesss (ability to isolate vowels and consonants and the sounds they make), she was below average. I think that is why people have suggested that a child who struggles a lot with blending may have dyslexia. it is very difficult for them to isolate sounds and nonsense words or words with no endings frustrate them to no end. I had dd work with a teacher at the school who used Abeka's blending ladder to work with her, and she just cried and cried. If you are curious, you go to http://www.lexercise.com. They have a quick diagnostic you can do for free which tests their reading level and their phonemic awareness. Then, if they identify that your child is at risk, you can choose to take the more in-depth (paid) test. My dd took the free test and scored at grade level on the reading part, but only got 34% on the phonemic awareness portion. We have not had the resources yet to pay for testing, but it's on the radar for the future. I would say if you suspect it at all, at least look into some of the warning signs because it is better to catch it early rather than late. We've been on a very frustrating 3-year journey to figure out the problem.
Yvonne
wife to Pete since 2002
born again believer since 2005
mom to 3 dd:
--elizabeth, 9
--abigail, 6
--faith, 3
ECC 2013-2014
Learning God's Story (1st) 2013-2014

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