Special Needs - Ideas & experiences using MFW

Art, Foreign Language, Music, Nature Walks, as well as general ideas and encouragement
cbollin

Child with Attention Deficit Disorder

Unread post by cbollin » Mon Aug 01, 2011 9:21 pm

smithrr wrote:I am researching home school curriculum for my three children (3rd grade, 1st grade, and preschool). My oldest child has Attention Deficit Disorder. She is challenged with working memory and fluid reasoning. It took us a while to pinpoint the issues because she really has no underlining learning disability. She is capable of learning things that hold her interest. She repeated kindergarten and 2nd grade was a struggle. Her psychologist recommended shorter, broken down units of work. I will also be teaching my other two children at the same time.

Is MFW the right choice for a child with ADD?

My third child is a little on the hyper active side... He needs to stay busy all the time :0) Will I be able to meet the needs of all three of my children with this program?
Welcome along.

My oldest has some interesting quirks. My middle gal has some issues with memory. My youngest has autism (so I have much sympathy for ADD and ADHD kids as well). Some of the things I like about using mfw with my special learners are: smaller broken day, little at a time lessons, the hands on projects. narration of materials. We've used MFW since 2003 almost exclusively -- adding in special needs therapies and such.

Yes, I think MFW should be on your short list of things to consider if you are hoping for Biblical integration into the study. I have to help my youngest a lot. But she's at the point now where she can do ADV. She did MFW's Kindy and 1st grade programs with some modifications for teaching. Then, last year she did mostly speech therapy and play therapy and cooking. Nice to get her back to some other subjects.

I'd like to recommend some great sites and people for homeschooling with ADHD children no matter what curriculum you use whether MFW or other.

*Melinda Boring, HeadsupNow.com she sells various teaching method books and lots of sensory gadgets. A hidden gem in the homeschool community.
*Carol Barnier (pronounced Barn Yeah) with SizzleBop.com I'd recommend you check her out and get some insights into teaching and living with "sizzle" style kiddos. She has a great sense of humor to all of it.
and it's older one, but Joyce Herzog's book Learning in Spite of Labels, is a classic for homeschoolers with special learners. It's those little teaching tricks and encouragement in there. It's not curriculum, but experience.

-crystal

smithrr
Posts: 3
Joined: Sun Jul 03, 2011 10:27 am

Re: Child with Attention Deficit Disorder

Unread post by smithrr » Mon Aug 01, 2011 9:33 pm

crystal- thanks for the quick reply.

One of my criteria for home school material is learning God's word. My children have attended Christian schooling from day 1.

My youngest child in addition to his non-stop activity also has physical disabilities where he will struggle in the traditional classroom setting. Another reason why I am looking into homeschooling.

Thank you for the links. It is so nice to find a forum to add to my research.... Thanks so much :)
Rachel
Wife to Jason
Mom to Alexandra (12), Elizabeth (10), and Caleb (7)
Rome to Reformation

jasntas
Posts: 469
Joined: Sun Apr 26, 2009 6:10 pm

Re: Child with Attention Deficit Disorder

Unread post by jasntas » Tue Aug 02, 2011 12:15 am

I have a dyslexic child and most likely a second. They both love MFW and the variety it brings. There are so many ways to learn the materials given and many opportunities are given in the TM to do so. It's not just sit down and do this worksheet. There are many hands on opportunities that have been great for my dc and I think would be a benefit for a child with ADD as well.

It's late and I'm not sure if this is making sense. If you'd like to you can take a look at my blog and get a glimpse of how school went for us last year using ECC. (Click on the link in my signature line). ADV was just as fun but I wasn't blogging then. :~ ;)
Tammie - Wife to James for 27 years
Mom to Justin (15) and Carissa (12)
ADV & K 2009-2010 . . . RTR (again) & WHL 2016-2017
http://tammiestime.blogspot.com/
The days of a mother are long but the years are short.

cbollin

Just learned 4 YO daughter has aspberger's

Unread post by cbollin » Thu Nov 08, 2012 1:03 pm

cinmor wrote:We just found out yesterday, after some diagnostic placement and screening at a local preschool through our school district, that after observing our daughter the conclusion has been made that we're looking at aspberger's. I know I have talked to a couple of you who also have children with special needs. We are going to the pediatric psychologist in December for the "official" diagnosis and screening. But we wanted to see about getting some services for her, so we went this route.

I feel like I am babbling but honestly I'm still processing this. I think deep down I was hoping it would be something that they would say she would grow out of. I am glad for a "diagnosis", because I know what we're working with, but I am sad too that this is what she'll have to deal with for the rest of her life!! I don't know yet how this plays out with homeschool, including our oldest daughter. Just today was an exhausting morning with my youngest. I need some kind of balance, and i don't know what that looks like. :-/ Of course, they're both the same children they were before the "a" word was mentioned, and even then I was struggling with balance. One thing we need to do together is sit our oldest down and really have a heart to heart conversation about her sister. I'm praying about wisdom for how and when to do that.

I guess today I'm just tired and looking for someone who's been there and understands!!! I'm struggling because I don't even know where to begin to process this.
Thanks so much.
Cindy
((((((((((((((((((hugs))))))))))))

my youngest, age 10, has autism. ((((hugs)))) to this day I can still recall how I felt when I realized that she wasn't going to get better....... not fair I thought... her next oldest sister "got better"... (wasn't autism with middle gal.. but you get the idea). what? I'm willing to admit that I didn't think it was fair!.

1. Give yourself permission to grieve during the processing of realizing that no.... this isn't going away. It is definitely ok to cry on this. The good thing is that Jesus is the name above all names, including asperger's, and autism and anything else out there. cancer, dyslexia, etc... Jesus is the name above it all. But it's ok to cry about this.

2. One of the more commonly read pieces of work out there that we parents share with each other when we realize that we're on a different path than others is a piece called Welcome to Holland.
here
http://www.our-kids.org/Archives/Holland.html
like that piece says.... the land of asperger's and autism really isn't a horrible disgusting place or anything.. it's just really different. but wow.. it describes the feelings, doesn't it? yeah...

3. our kiddos have to be taught social skills. they are not caught. and I know all children have to be taught, but it's different. think of your stereotype theoretical physicist. dont' worry... in a few years you'll laugh with me at that joke. if you feel like hitting me right now.. it's ok too. :)

one of the more recent popular books is the Jed Baker books. search on jed baker social skills. that should bring up those titles like Social Skills Picture Book by Dr. Jed Baker, and other ones... check library first.. etc.. etc....

4. check out the book list on melinda boring's website for spectrum stuff. maybe library has a few of those titles.
http://www.headsupnow.com/products-page ... nd-autism/


yes.. you can homeschool with special needs. you might enjoy signing up for HSLDA special needs email newsletter.......

so. that's enough for now to process for a few days...

-crystal

mshanson3121
Posts: 28
Joined: Wed May 09, 2012 7:05 pm

Re: Just learned 4 YO daughter has aspberger's

Unread post by mshanson3121 » Thu Nov 08, 2012 2:06 pm

cinmor wrote:Crystal, I do remember talking to you!! We had a lovely conversation on all the finer points of *not* being able to potty train my daughter!! Still not there yet...HA!!! That piece called Welcome to Holland totally made me cry. I appreciate your words and understanding. I'll have to check out HSLDA for the special needs stuff. I think part of me is also angry, because I grew up with a special needs brother. I saw all my parents went through, and what he went through. I don't want that for my daughter. This is going to be different. Somehow it has to be.
Hugs to you, I've been there, just recently. I also grew up with a special needs sibling, a younger sister, severely autistic (very low functioning) with Turner's Syndrome to boot.

We found out last month that our son (5) has Tourette's Syndrome & quite significant Sensory Processing Disorder. And like you, in a sense I was so relieved to have a diagnosis, because I felt like a) I finally had validation to admit that it has been HARD b) Now we could move forward with getting him the therapy that he needs.

But I didn't allow myself to "mourn" yet, because they don't affect his "health", if you know what I mean. Our 2 year old daughter on the otherhand was born with two heart defects, and suffered so much from the day she was born with heart failure and kidney failure and feeding tubes and other complications. It was a weird feeling of comparison... why would I mourn when his health was perfect? I figured people would just think, "Well at least it's not what your daughter went through".

But you know what... we can't compare. One day was a bad day, his sensory issues were on overload. He was so scared of the dryer going in the bathroom that he peed his pants in the kitchen, because he couldn't go into the bathroom (due to the noise). He had a friend on his way over to play, arriving any moment, and my son looked at me and said, "Mommy, please clean me up, I don't want "X" to see me like this." And I cried then. Hard.

Because while it may not affect his physical health, it affects his mental and emotional health, which is EVERY bit as important. And it hurts a mother's heart to know that there is something wrong with their child - regardless of what that is.

We're still learning ourselves, but what I can say is just keep offering it up to God. And make sure you talk to your older daughter, explain to her (as best you can) what is going on. Be honest... tell her that there are going to be times that you take your frustrations out on her, but make a promise to her that you are going to try hard not to. Make her proactive about it, give her permission to tell you if she sees you starting to be short-tempered with her (maybe get her to squeeze your hand). That's your notice to step back and take a breath. Lock yourself in the bathroom for a minute, pray, scream in a pillow, cry, do what you need.

Too often we think we have to be 100% perfectly in control of our emotions in front of our children, but it's okay to let them see us mad, frustrated, angry, scared, hurt. It lets them know that these emotions are okay - they learn to deal with their emotions through watching us deal with ours.

Hugs and prayers to you.

Poohbee
Posts: 394
Joined: Sat Feb 24, 2007 10:38 pm
Location: North Dakota

Re: Just learned 4 YO daughter has aspberger's

Unread post by Poohbee » Thu Nov 08, 2012 2:56 pm

Hi Cindy!

My heart goes out to you. I am right there with you, and I understand how you're feeling. My 3-yo son was diagnosed with autism in February of this year. My husband and I weren't surprised by it, because we recognized many of the symptoms in him. But, still, yes, you mourn a bit because you know that your child will have some challenges in life. Yes, they all have challenges, but somehow, it's different.

Even before my son was diagnosed, he was in ST, PT, and OT because of developmental delays. So, already, it seemed that our life was revolving around his therapies, but it seemed it stepped up even more after his diagnosis because we added more therapy sessions. I wasn't very good at scheduling everything at first, so it seemed that we were off to therapy 4 days a week, and we live half an hour away from where his therapies are. We were having a hard time getting school accomplished, because after a day in town for therapy, we were too tired to do school when we got home. I felt like I was short-changing my daughters, and that everything was revolving around my son.

Well, there are a few realizations that have helped me...in accepting his diagnosis and in keeping life going for our family.

1. My son is still Jacob. He hasn't changed since he was diagnosed. He is still the precious little boy I love so much! I love all of his little quirks, and I wouldn't change who he is for anything!
2. Even though he has autism, has many little quirks, is not yet even beginning to potty train, is not verbal enough so that anyone but immediate family could understand him, and he needs so many therapies and so much help, my husband and I still want him to just be a kid and enjoy his childhood. The doctor who diagnosed him advocated ABA therapy. As I researched ABA, it seemed to be very intensive therapy, and I knew that would not work for our family. I will do anything for my son...anything that will help him...but my dh and I also want him to have a childhood as well, one that is not completely consumed by therapies. So, we have done our best to create an environment for Jacob that meets his needs but meets the needs of our daughters and our entire family, as well.
3. Our life is not all about autism. We don't live and breathe it. I kind of did right after his diagnosis. I find that when I am reading too many books about autism, I worry and fret more about Jacob and his future. I have learned to read less and to trust God more. I still worry at times, but I try to leave it in God's hands. Also, my daughters have needs, as well. We have committed to a homeschooling lifestyle. I am responsible for their education. So, I cannot have everything revolve around Jacob and his therapies. This school year, I have worked very hard to schedule therapies and other appointments on only 3 days a week, and we have to travel for them only one day a week, and I keep 2 days a week with no therapies scheduled so that we can have 2 uninterrupted days to be home doing school. We still have school on the other 3 days, but on those days, we have to school in the car and at the therapy office and here and there between therapist visits to our home.

Don't get me wrong. It is not easy. It is hard and exhausting...homeschooling and meeting the needs of a special needs child while trying to keep a home and a family going. I'll say it again...it is exhausting. I am tired all the time. BUT, YOU CAN DO IT! Rely on God and His strength, and amazingly, He gives you what you need each and every day...the energy and strength to do what you need to do to get you through the day. And he brings some beautiful, humorous, precious moments to lighten your load now and then.

My advice for you:
1. Research and read a bit about asperger's, but not too much. You can find yourself drowning in sorrow and worry if you read too much. Look for books by parents of kids with asperger's or autism rather than doctors and professionals, and look for books by Christian parents, who will give you encouragement for the journey.
2. Don't let asperger's take over your life. Let your daughter be a kid, give special attention to your older daughter, because she will need it, and maintain a routine for your family outside of therapies and doctor appts.
3. Read the Bible, pray, and listen to praise music daily. You need that encouragement for your spirit.
4. Just love on your girls! Enjoy your time with them. Remember how much you love them, especially when your youngest is driving you crazy with her unique and compelling needs.

I'll keep you in my prayers. Hang in there! You can do this!

In Christ,
Jen
Jen
happily married to Vince (19 yrs)
blessed by MFW since 2006
have used every year K-1850MOD
2018-2019: Adventures with 9yo boy

cinmor
Posts: 12
Joined: Tue Jan 10, 2012 3:16 pm
Location: Texas

Re: Just learned 4 YO daughter has aspberger's

Unread post by cinmor » Fri Nov 30, 2012 6:52 pm

Thank you SO much everyone. All of your words of encouragement really mean so much. I'm doing better with things now, I guess it's sunk in more now, and really, it's still life as it was with my girl!! I definitely, through other conversations with homeschooling moms, need to talk with the Lord about how things are being done here in our home and see if there are any changes He wants me to make, and kind of go from there. We're going to continue (for now) letting her go to the pre-K program 3 days a week, where she will be getting some free services for the time she is there. I think this will give me some time to investigate insurance and private therapy options as well as kind of help me to get a framework from which to work with when it is time to "do" school with her. I would sure appreciate prayers for appts, that the Lord would show us things that we shouldn't agree with, and those things that are the safe things. I know He's got her covered, and I want to follow His leading on all of this.

I hope you all have a wonderful, blessed weekend!!

His,
Cindy
Cindy M
Mama to
Joseph Age (18 mos)
Mikayla Age (8)~Completing Learning God's story, moving on to Adventures/Exp to 1850 with big sis
Hannah Age (12)~Already completed MFW K,1st, Adv, ECC, CTC, and RTR, now doing Exp to 1850

danabogan
Posts: 7
Joined: Sat Feb 20, 2010 4:34 pm

Re: Just learned 4 YO daughter has aspberger's

Unread post by danabogan » Wed Dec 05, 2012 7:14 am

Well, good news is that you found out early with your daughter which will help tremendously with social development and learning of coping mechanisms. My son, who is now 17, was diagnosed in grade 5 with Aspberger's. So, to say that we were a bit behind with getting services and help he needed is an understatement. However, from the age of 4 we knew something wasn't quite right and we had several different diagnoses when he was younger. Which in the end, he did receive therapies through all of that that helped with different issues he was displaying.

Long story short, the main reason we began homeschooling in 6th grade was because we did get an official diagnoses and the public school was getting ready to handicap my son even more. We have always believed that even though my son struggled, he was very capable of more than what most gave him credit for. Even after his diagnoses at age 10, we did not tell him that he had Aspberger's. Not that we didn't accept the diagnoses or that we were ashamed of it, but that we didn't want our son to use it as an excuse as to why he couldn't do certain things. We honestly just told him a few months ago about him being diagnosed with Aspberger's and it was no big deal to him.

I can remember finally getting the name of what was going on, Aspberger's, and for a few days I was downtrodden and upset by it. Then like so many others, I realized quickly, that my child was the same as he had been always since the day he was born. At that point, I was excited because then we were able to implement some therapies that truly started helping him with his higher language and sensory issues. Things started making better sense as to why he did what he did, even back to when he was a baby. God was so amazing to show us exactly what we needed to know when He did.

Now my son is doing well academically and socially. Ok, he'll never have tons of friends nor does he even have that desire, but he interacts fine in social situations. Through homeschooling we have been able to equip him with more tools and we were available to teach him social cues that Aspberger children don't understand. We are now living abroad as missionaries and he has learned to take many things in stride and not to be a prisoner to his routine tendencies. In the spring he will be visiting universities and is praying about what direction God would have him go. At the age of 5 or 6 I didn't even know if he would be able to live on his own as an adult. Now, I have no doubt that he will excel in whatever he does through God's help.

I hope this has been a bit of encouragement. My son still struggles in ways that others his age usually don't, but honestly most people are shocked when I tell them that he has Aspberger's. Children with Aspberger's are extremely intelligent but they view things very differently. If anything, continue to advocate for your child with therapists and doctors, and don't use the diagnoses as a crutch when she can't do things or struggle. She will have challenges to overcome but when she does, she will realize that God has gifted her in ways that other children are not. It is an adventure and one that I'm blessed by God to be called to parent children such as this. Now I have a 9 year old son that seems to be following in his brother's footsteps. My younger son was originally diagnosed with other things, but as the years are going by, I'm seeing so many of the same issues that my oldest has displayed.

If you have other questions you can email me at danabogan@hotmail.com. I would love to share therapies and different things that I've learned along the way.

Blessings,

Dana Bogan
Thankful Wife and Mother of 4 (DS-17, DS-15, DD-11, DS-9)

Poohbee
Posts: 394
Joined: Sat Feb 24, 2007 10:38 pm
Location: North Dakota

Update: needing some encouragement all around

Unread post by Poohbee » Sun Jan 12, 2014 1:21 pm

hsm wrote:Here's an update to my original post [ http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php ... 196#p96196 ].

We have found since my last post that my oldest was diagnosed with sensory processing disorder/low registration which causes a lot of her issues (ho-hum attitude, appearance of lack of interest, forgetfulness, inability to stay focused, etc.) I didn't realize how much it impacts daily life. This combined with her hearing loss requires we make adjustments to our day to help her cope with these things. She is not doing therapy. I am making our own changes and implementing sensory diet ideas at home. I also have to stay with her to keep her on task. She is not very independent yet.

My son was diagnosed with sensory processing disorder, expressive language disorder, ADHD-combined type, extremely delayed fine motor skills, other OT issues (core strength, motor delays, visual processing, self help skills,etc). He also has a hearing loss and needs physical therapy (with possible orthotics) to correct an issue with his feet. Whew! The neuropsychologist feels that all of this combined is the root of his tantrums. Imagine his level of frustration. Everything is hard and he is always being corrected. It makes for a frustrated little boy. His tantrums have improved considerably with my changing my reactions to his behavior. We are doing a lot of therapy with him to help him (and me) cope and find a way to teach him effectively. With his speech and hearing, it is very hard for him to do the blending. And, on Friday, he blended! We were over the moon. We danced around, screamed, acted all crazy in celebration. It was a good moment. We have a loooooong exhausting road ahead of us but those moments carry me. As posters advised, we are taking the K year as slow as necessary. We didn't stop entirely but we are going at a speed he can handle and we take breaks as needed. I am okay with that. I am realizing it is not a race. I have also had to become okay with the fact that he does not want to do any of the fun crafts. :( Probably because it is hard with the fine motor, sensory, and attention issues.

That said, I could use some ideas on how to entertain him while I teach the olders. He does not want to join us for ECC and if I force it, it is counterproductive. He doesn't play well alone (which we are working on). He only wants to play video games ;( I really try to limit it but right now I am just trying to get through the day. Any suggestions? I know we need to limit screen time and encourage more productive "entertain yourself activities" but we aren't there yet. Working on it, but I could use any pointers here. We will be going to a counselor to help us cope with all of these issues, but until then....

Also, I am sure you have figured out that we are never "caught up" in the curriculum, which frustrates me. I am trying to embrace year round school to help with that. We are out of the house a lot for therapies and evals. I have to take a lot of time out of my day to attend to various issues and at home therapy needs. It's a lot and I am stressed, but I am happy to know what I am dealing with now. We attend a music class and a music lesson on Wednesday mornings and a co-op 2 Fridays per month. I hate to take that away because I think it is important as well, but I am ragged. My husband feels it is important to do those things also.

Sorry for the book, but wanted to update that we did look into the red flags and now we are trying to find our footing. Thanks for "listening" :-)
Lori, it is nice to get an update on how you and your kids are doing.

I absolutely understand about the busyness that therapies bring. My son is 4. He was diagnosed with autism when he was almost 3, but we had started therapies for him when he was 1. We've done PT, OT, and ST. That first year after his diagnosis was crazy. I felt like we were out of the house, running to therapies all the time. I think we had therapies scheduled 4 days a week...one of the days was in-home therapy, but it still interrupted our day. We live in a small town about 25 miles from the nearest city where my son receives therapy. Over time, I have figured out how to better manage our schedule. I schedule therapies for my son 3 days a week and I keep 2 days with no therapies or appointments so that we know we have those 2 days at home, uninterrupted (usually) for schooling. Of course, we do school on my son's therapy days, as well, but we have to adapt a bit. For example, Tuesdays are our days to travel 25 miles for therapy. So, on those days, I schedule things we can take with us and that my daughters can work on in the therapy office while we are there for an hour and a half. Also, I do any audio things in the car as we travel to and from the city...it is an hour in the car to listen to Story of the World on audiobook, music CDs, or other audiobooks for read-aloud. I also try to schedule all of our doctor, dentist, orthodontist appts. etc. for Tuesday afternoons, while we are in the city. That way, we don't have to leave the house other days for appointments. There are exceptions, but for the most part, it has worked well. I just tell schedulers at the doctors' offices that Tuesday afternoons work best for me, and they are usually able to schedule us then.

So, I just wanted to give encouragement that even though it might feel like your son's therapies are running your life, you can take control and really work the schedule so that it works for you and your family, and so that you are still able to be home sometimes and accomplish the schooling that you need to.

Also, you mentioned your co-op and some other lessons. During this season of life with many therapies, you may want to consider limiting other activities. We, too, attend a co-op. Our co-op meets 2 Thursdays each month. Because of my son's therapies, that would be too much for me, so we requested that we attend just once a month, and the ladies in the co-op graciously agreed that it would be okay for us to do that. It doesn't seem like much to be gone just one extra day a month, but when you are running to therapies each week, even just one more day with commitments makes a difference.

So, maybe you can figure out a way to still be involved in your co-op, but to limit it a bit so you have more time at home. Just an idea for you. It has worked well for us.

Just wanted to give you encouragement, Lori, that God is sovereign. He knows your situation, and as you give it to Him, He will help you find the solutions that you need to meet your son's needs, the needs of your other children, and God will meet your needs, as well.

Hang in there!
Jen
happily married to Vince (19 yrs)
blessed by MFW since 2006
have used every year K-1850MOD
2018-2019: Adventures with 9yo boy

hsm
Posts: 146
Joined: Wed Jan 02, 2013 8:09 pm

Re: needing some encouragement all around

Unread post by hsm » Mon Jan 13, 2014 2:15 pm

Jen, thank you for the encouragement. Right now his therapies are only on Tuesdays but we will be adding another one or two. I like the idea of keeping everything on one or two days like you said. When we have his therapy, my girls save some of their work that we do that morning to do in the waiting room...usually math or reading. This way we can usually get most of our stuff done on that day still. I have been thinking about the other activities lately. One of our co-op days is a field trip day so that is always optional. We aren't "required" to attend any of the days as they bring in other people to teach or do assemblies rather than parents, so that is nice. My oldest does violin lesson on Wednesday mornings and the girls both do a choir class right after that. We try to get a full day in after that but often we only get through half of the work. I suppose that isn't all that bad. I don't want to let the music go because this is the first time my oldest has found something she loves and still wants to do months later! :-) We spend so much time catering to ds that I feel the girls need something too, kwim? Also, my oldest dd (with sensory processing disorder also) struggles socially. These activities are good for her (I think?).

I am sure you had to do therapy activities at home too, right? How did you fit that in with school work? I have to do it with 2 of mine, but on a more in depth basis with ds. Also, do you have any ideas on how to keep him happy and entertained while I am teaching my olders? Just looking for some ideas....this is something we are working on. He can be demanding %| He thinks I take too long teaching the girls...sigh.
Lori-IL
K/ECC, CtG/Learning God's Story
dd-12, dd-9, ds-6

Poohbee
Posts: 394
Joined: Sat Feb 24, 2007 10:38 pm
Location: North Dakota

Re: needing some encouragement all around

Unread post by Poohbee » Mon Jan 13, 2014 3:29 pm

I understand about you wanting to keep those music lessons...especially if your dd has had trouble finding an extracurricular activity that interests her. I have that problem with my eldest dd. I keep encouraging her to find one extra thing to do that is interesting to her, but she just dabbles in things here and there. She hasn't really found just the right thing for her. When she does, I'm sure I will do whatever we can to help her foster and grow that interest. And, I do understand, too, that the therapies for your ds can be so consuming, and you want to have something for your daughters that they can do and be involved in. By all means, I'd say keep on with the music lessons! :-)

For the therapy activities we need to do at home, we just try to build them into every day life. For my son, many of the things are speech related, because he has a speech delay. So, we work on those speech things throughout the day. For some of the OT activities, I do have a specific preschool time with my son (only about 1/2 hour each day), and we work on those things during his "school time." I try to combine objectives so that we work on his fine motor activities along with the academic activities I want him to do. We try to combine them.

As to how to entertain your son when you teach your olders...I'm sorry, but I won't be much help there. Thankfully, my son entertains himself pretty well. I start the day by having my dds do independent work while I do preschool with my son. I find that it works best for me to work with my son first, and then he is free to play the rest of the day. When we finish our preschool time, he is content to run off and play and do his own thing. Then, throughout the day, as my dds do some work independently now and then, I return and try to engage my son in a game, or I just go and sit with him for awhile and see what he is playing and try to join in a bit. Then, I return to my girls and work with them some more. It sometimes feels like you are bouncing around from kid to kid all day, but that is just how it goes. :-) I guess my only advice would be to try to break up the time you spend working with your girls to spend just a bit of time with your son here and there. Maybe that will help him be content for just a bit. Just an idea. :-)

Hang in there!
Jen
happily married to Vince (19 yrs)
blessed by MFW since 2006
have used every year K-1850MOD
2018-2019: Adventures with 9yo boy

jasntas
Posts: 469
Joined: Sun Apr 26, 2009 6:10 pm

ADHD, Gifted but Anxious

Unread post by jasntas » Thu Nov 13, 2014 12:23 pm

carissa wrote:Our ds (10) is struggling after our move this summer. He is gifted, but struggles with ADHD and anxiety. The school has asked us to homeschool him in the afternoons. They are pushing for us to agree to him being in an Emotionally Impaired classroom. At home in the afternoons, he is mostly calm, and he does his work (with some reminders). I would rather pull him out of 5th grade and homeschool him than agree to their plan.

So, where to start? I was thinking about putting him back a year, and treating him more like a 4th grader. Kids with ADHD tend to be about 3 years behind their peers in maturity. I think he has missed a good portion of what has been going on in the classroom during the last half of 4th and the first half of 5th. I also think he needs to build up his confidence. He needs an infusion of "I can do this!!!" in his soul, poor kid. :(

If we address the situation like he's in 4th grade, and we only have December - May for this academic year, should we start with ECC, then move to Creation to Greeks in the fall? How do most people modify ECC if they do not have a full school year in which to complete it? (We have twin 3rd graders that may also come home in the fall, but I think it will be just him for now.) Any suggestions about modifications for the ADHD/anxiety are appreciated, too, but I will probably post separately asking about that. :)

We home schooled initially, then we put the kids in public school for two years. We will be returning to homeschooling if we do this. :) Thanks in advance!!!
My first question is, what subjects is the school teaching him in the morning and what subjects would you need to cover in the afternoon?

Both my dc are dyslexic and I am very sure (even without testing) that my ds is also ADD. He walks around when I am reading aloud and he makes funny gestures and sayings when I'm reading. It drives me nuts but he actually retains it that way. Just yesterday we were learning about Japan's Meiji Restoration. Both kids thought it was quite boring but my ds started acting out the parts and they were both laughing and having a good time. For instance, he was pretending to be a Samurai with a sword going up against the new army of conscripts with guns. I had to bring them back to earth to continue the reading but when I asked the questions they both remembered most of what I read. If my ds sits there like a zombie his mind wanders to who knows where and he has a hard time answering the questions. I even have him following along with the Kindle app or the book and he still struggles with recall unless he is able to act it out or at least walk around while listening. It is a challenge for me sometimes but it works for him. (Really for both my dc when he acts it out). You can't do that in a classroom! ;)

I also have been using a lot of videos for history and science from YouTube and other sources lately and it has been working great for retention as well. (As always, use caution when using YouTube). You can see what we have been doing if you go to my blog. (The link is in my signature line). I use another fellow blogger's list most of the time and then add or change what works best for us.

I would not bring your ds down a grade. At least not as far as he would know. Being that both my dc are dyslexic I have always modified their work to what they each can handle. So if you are talking just the history, science, Bible, etc. I would just teach as is and modify any assignments, if needed. The 5 year cycle covers a large span of ages. If he needs extra time in math, LA, etc. teach the level he needs or just slow down a little but don't get too far behind if you can help it. My ds is about 3 years behind in math right now and he has finally decided to step it up and work double time to try to catch up. I think we have finally found a math that seems to be working for him. (Teaching Textbooks) If he keeps up his momentum, he will finish three levels in one year but it is not fun. And he will technically still be behind. This has hindered him with science as well. I didn't realize he needed the higher math for the higher science. %| I have actually tried to get him to try TT for about the last 2 years and now he has finally decided he likes it. Anyway...

If you chose ECC, you could just spend one week instead of two in each country. Just pick and choose what you want to teach from each country. Or just teach it as is to the end of the school year and call it done. :-) I think ECC would probably be the easiest to do this with.

Well, those are just some of my random thoughts. I hope you find something helpful. And I hope others with better advice chime in as well. :-)

P.S. My dd's name is Carissa also! 8)
Tammie - Wife to James for 27 years
Mom to Justin (15) and Carissa (12)
ADV & K 2009-2010 . . . RTR (again) & WHL 2016-2017
http://tammiestime.blogspot.com/
The days of a mother are long but the years are short.

carissa
Posts: 21
Joined: Sun Jun 07, 2009 4:33 pm

Re: ADHD, Gifted but Anxious

Unread post by carissa » Thu Nov 13, 2014 1:38 pm

Thanks for your thoughts, Tammie! For now, the school is sending home language arts work for the afternoon, but if we pull him, we'll use MFW ECC, and add LA and Math to be a full curriculum. We will make a final decision in the next three weeks.

It is good to know that ECC is written to do two weeks on each country. Paring that down to one week each sounds like a simple way to make it last half a year.

I feel like he's missed out on some LA skills and for sure some math concepts. I'd really like him to feel less pressure while we get his intense anxiety under better control--both reasons I'm considering counting this year as a repeat of 4th grade. Lots of people do Kindy with their kids at age 6, so I don't think it would be a bad idea to hit pause and let him catch up. However, I probably wouldn't even mention that to him. Who knows…once he's functioning better, he may be able to tackle more lessons in one week, like your son, so lightening up this year doesn't necessarily mean his graduation would be delayed. Maybe, but not for sure.

Thanks again!
Carissa in Michigan
Wife to Steve for 21 years.
Mom to ds Brendan (10), ds Caden (8) and dd Sydney (8).
We've done MFW-K, ADV, public school for 2 years, and now considering ECC :)

jasntas
Posts: 469
Joined: Sun Apr 26, 2009 6:10 pm

Re: ADHD, Gifted but Anxious

Unread post by jasntas » Thu Nov 13, 2014 8:07 pm

carissa wrote:Thanks for your thoughts, Tammie! For now, the school is sending home language arts work for the afternoon, but if we pull him, we'll use MFW ECC, and add LA and Math to be a full curriculum. We will make a final decision in the next three weeks.
Gotcha! :-)
carissa wrote: It is good to know that ECC is written to do two weeks on each country. Paring that down to one week each sounds like a simple way to make it last half a year.

I feel like he's missed out on some LA skills and for sure some math concepts. I'd really like him to feel less pressure while we get his intense anxiety under better control--both reasons I'm considering counting this year as a repeat of 4th grade. Lots of people do Kindy with their kids at age 6, so I don't think it would be a bad idea to hit pause and let him catch up. However, I probably wouldn't even mention that to him. Who knows…once he's functioning better, he may be able to tackle more lessons in one week, like your son, so lightening up this year doesn't necessarily mean his graduation would be delayed. Maybe, but not for sure.

Thanks again!
I took my ds out of public school after 2nd grade and used ADV his 3rd grade year instead of using ECC for a lot of the same reasons. Although, I have been reluctant to hold my ds back because he has a late birthday and he would graduate at 19 1/2 if held back a year. It's probably not a big deal and may happen anyway.
carissa wrote:P.S. - I'm also looking at Teaching Textbooks. :)
We have both really liked TT for several reasons. It gives a mini lecture at the beginning of each lesson. Every problem is read to the student and immediate feedback is given. If the student misses a problem, he/she has the option to see a mini lesson on how to do that problem. Many of the problems give the student 2 tries in case the number was just entered incorrectly and it also gives the student the opportunity to rework the problem. And the newest versions grades the lessons and quizzes for the parent/teacher.

My ds is almost at the end of his first of the three TT books we are pushing to finish this year. Yahoo! :-) (I think I'm more excited about it than he is.) He didn't start it until about the middle of September so he's making good time. I have been able to skip some lessons and just have him take the quizzes because he already knew some of the material. I just got the new book and he will probably be able to skip the first 4 or 5 lessons in the new book and just take those quizzes as well. That would be the whole first disc which is one fourth of the book! :-) The third book should take a little longer but if we stay on schedule he should finish by the end of June. Sorry about my enthusiasm but math has been such a struggle. Now, if I could just get him through his spelling program before he graduates high school. ;)
Tammie - Wife to James for 27 years
Mom to Justin (15) and Carissa (12)
ADV & K 2009-2010 . . . RTR (again) & WHL 2016-2017
http://tammiestime.blogspot.com/
The days of a mother are long but the years are short.

Julie in MN
Posts: 2925
Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 3:44 pm
Location: Minnesota

Re: ADHD, Gifted but Anxious

Unread post by Julie in MN » Thu Nov 13, 2014 9:39 pm

Hi Carissa (and Tammie),
I just wanted to join in from the point of view of someone who's done a few things in unusual ways, too.

My oldest didn't start K until he was 6 (he was 18 when he graduated, almost 19). Once in a while over the years, he would moan that I had been a bad mom to start him so late (in public school). Most of his closest friends were a grade or two ahead of him. However, they are all still good friends now and they are all age 30 or so. I think being older made my son more relaxed and confident. He didn't start college till age 20 (he went to Army Reserves training first), but age didn't hurt him, he had friends there that he still sees, he graduated college in 4 years rather than 5-6 like some of his comrades, and is an engineer now plus in grad school.

Another out-of-the-ordinary thing I did was start MFW years at the end of January (the local semester break), rather than September. We got off-track when my husband was very sick, and we just stayed off-track. So I would stop a program for the summer and pick the same program up again in the fall; then in the winter at the semester break we would switch. I honestly don't think my son paid any attention to it all.

History and science and Bible are all important to worldview and character, but English and Math are the primary "education" goals, I think. And those can be done wherever your student is. Despite grade levels on many books, the content is often similar. Those don't have to start in September, either.

So all that said, here is one more scenario for you to add to your options:

Start ECC when you bring your son home. Spend as much time as needed on the first two weeks, which are an intro to geography. Maybe you could tell your son that you might repeat those 2 weeks again next fall when his siblings come home to school, so he need not stress about them. Then the next several weeks are a study of North America, and those also tend to be a little fuller just because most of us live on that continent, so you could take as long as you need for those studies. I wouldn't give him any of the World Geography pages for a while, because those are "research" and are not "repeat back" types of worksheets he may be used to from public school, so they might stress him out at first. Use book basket to feed his giftedness, and maybe have him write a bit about what he learns if there is room in his day. Then by the time you get to South America, things become fairly routine. There are 3 weeks in Brazil (when you are also studying South America in general), so the pace is gentle and the routine is set. I'd just do what you can and move on when you are ready. Then in the fall, maybe go back and do weeks 1 & 2 with the siblings, letting your older son "teach" them a few of the activities, and then jump into the country you were on when you stopped for summer break, and the transition to 3 students should be fairly smooth because you are familiar with ECC.

Meanwhile, I like to spend some time when a student first comes home (or back home) finding out where they are in math, math drill, reading, handwriting, composition, English skills, typing, etc. Then once you begin the math and LA programs you have selected, you may evaluate whether some things can be skipped through quickly (like Tammie described) or other things need extra time.

Just another idea,
Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

carissa
Posts: 21
Joined: Sun Jun 07, 2009 4:33 pm

Re: ADHD, Gifted but Anxious

Unread post by carissa » Sat Nov 15, 2014 2:16 pm

Thanks for your insights, Julie! I like the idea of being in the middle of ECC when we add in the twins. I'm sure the routine would be helpful as we fold them into the mix. I appreciate you and Tammie taking the time to give me input and encouragement!!
Carissa in Michigan
Wife to Steve for 21 years.
Mom to ds Brendan (10), ds Caden (8) and dd Sydney (8).
We've done MFW-K, ADV, public school for 2 years, and now considering ECC :)

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 19 guests