Schedule - Keeping up with a fast or advanced child

Art, Foreign Language, Music, Nature Walks, as well as general ideas and encouragement
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cbollin

Schedule - Keeping up with a fast or advanced child

Unread post by cbollin » Tue Nov 06, 2007 11:43 am

Keeping up with an advanced child
teach4 wrote:How do people who had "advanced" students keep up with the learning curve and their constant desire for stimulation? My 8 yr old son is a very rapid learner. He flies through a week of adventures in 3 days and we supplement with a lot of library books.

I plan to add in Rosetta Stone eventually but am not in a position to purchase it right now. I have him in classes 2 mornings a week through a homeschool resource center. There are not many homeschool families in our immediate area, and our neighborhood is not conducive for him to be outside past the boundaries of our yard. I make sure all the kids are outside a minimum of an hour a day, but I usually have to be out there with them.

Because he has three younger siblings I can't become to involved in helping him with extra projects. So the afternoons often become very long for him. God has put it on my heart to homeschool but my mind keeps wondering if it is better to put him back in public school where someone else can occupy him. I am frazzled and exhausted trying to keep up with younger childrens basic needs and the older ones emotional needs. Any thought/encouragement would be a blessing.
Here is a favorite "classic" discussion in the archives to help with ideas for productive afternoons (or whenever school is done).
http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php?t=1829

Many many many years ago when I was in elementary school they used that same label on me that your son has. Speaking a bit from that perspective of "being smart and bored"....

Don't forget to have them learn how to cook, how and when to clean, and help them to find a productive hobby (craft, art work), and finding ways to help others (service). If you aren't already having some kind of schedule for him to follow to help with time management, consider setting up something like that to help him use him free time more productively.

Hang in there... the whole year is a learning curve for everyone that first year of homeschooling. My kids don't have a lot of other homeschoolers to hang out with either.

-crystal

HSmommi2mine
Posts: 159
Joined: Mon Oct 23, 2006 5:59 pm

Re: ? About an advanced

Unread post by HSmommi2mine » Tue Nov 06, 2007 2:08 pm

Check your library for foreign language stuff to start with, until you can get Rosetta. Often another language is perfect for challenging a gifted/ bright student.

Give him a project he can do on his own. Making a fort or playing with real clay. Something long term that he can really get into. Can he build a Lego city in his room or something?

Jenn in NC
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Joined: Fri Jun 23, 2006 2:00 pm

Re: ? About an advanced

Unread post by Jenn in NC » Wed Nov 07, 2007 6:35 am

teach4 wrote:God has put it on my heart to homeschool but my mind keeps wondering if it is better to put him back in public school where someone else can occupy him.
I just wanted to raise the idea that your ds might end up being just as bored in ps, if not more. I remember being pretty excruciatingly bored. Yes they keep you busy all day, but so much of it is just that -- busy work. Not interesting enough to truly engage the child, not compelling enough to really motivate or inspire them. kwim?

Just a thought. Might not apply in your case.

One thing that has helped with my oldest (who sounds a lot like yours) is an exercise program. It doesn't have to be too structured (don't want to make more work for mom), but a challenging goal for him to work toward and the physical exertion seems to help with the tendency toward insomnia and depression.

Also, chess. Have you tried that already? Is there anyone who he could play with if he was to learn the game? There are several good resources for children to learn -- maybe your library would have something?

Praying you will find the answer.
mommy to four boys & two girls... and another boy on the way :)
completed K, 1st, ADV, ECC, CTG and RTR
2009--2010 Enjoying Exploration to 1850

Julie in MN
Posts: 2925
Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 3:44 pm
Location: Minnesota

Re: ? About an advanced

Unread post by Julie in MN » Wed Nov 07, 2007 10:22 am

I like HSmommi2mine's ideas of a big project (learn a language, build a fort) to exercise his abilities. Maybe there could even be some kind of end-goal/reward, such as a presentation at an end-of-year homeschool event (a display on how he built the fort, or a cultural display with his speaking/teaching some easy words).

As for his social needs, I would make sure the 2 outside classes are meeting those needs. Two classes is a lot for you to drive him to, and I would make sure they are very social, because it seems his social needs are greater than his academic needs at this point. Some classes are very much "sit in your seat and be quiet" kinds of classes, so he won't get to know other kids at all.

Otherwise, are there ways to meet this need in the home? How much younger is the next sibling? Is there a way to encourage a close friendship between your two oldest kids? Or even between your oldest and a pet?

Or can he get very involved in serving the family (cooking, babysitting) or serving someone else in your area? I think feeling valued and needed goes a long way towards meeting social needs.

Just some ideas,
Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

teach4
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Joined: Mon Jun 04, 2007 12:10 am

Re: ? About an advanced

Unread post by teach4 » Fri Nov 09, 2007 7:04 pm

just wanted to say thanks again for your support and ideas. i don't get on here everyday to reply but I really value the support and community. cymbrie

Julie in MN
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Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 3:44 pm
Location: Minnesota

Ideas: For a 6th grader who wants MORE projects!

Unread post by Julie in MN » Thu May 22, 2008 11:10 pm

4Truth wrote:My 6th grader is ASKING for more. We're doing RTR. We do a timeline book but she asked for more projects. She asked to do research. She wants to WRITE about or DO something with her history readings, not just narrate, maybe or maybe not do a notebook page, and maybe or maybe not do a little more mapwork. Ideas?

It has to be things she can take charge of and do on her own, not another "group" thing that she has to wait on mom and little sisters for, kwim?
Posted: Thu Nov 08, 2007 7:58 pm

Hi Donna,
I couldn't tell if your dd likes the notebooking method? But her notebook can become anything she prefers. I sometimes have my 6th grade ds do extra notebook pages on things we have learned. Recently I had him do an extra page on King Richard/King John/Robinhood. He could easily have done extras on even more topics such as the Black Plague, the War of the Roses, etc. I usually consider what other things we are doing or writing about at the time. (We are late in RTR.)

A notebook page can be whatever style the student prefers. My older dd did a lot of drawing and hand-drawn mapwork, as well as charts and diagrams showing how things fell together.

She also added extra miscellaneous people and events to lists on lined pages (from the Ultimate Geography and Timeline book, but you could make your own with cardstock & a little time logo). Each page had a timespan labeled at the top.

My ds tends to write a description, and it is usually a little on the funny side (at least if you are an 11 yo boy). He also experiments with fonts and styles, and uses Google images.

But basically, the student is "teaching back" what they have learned, in what they consider an appealing way. I think this works well to foster retention. And the student has it to refer back to for years to come.

And something we do at our co-op is have each child present a topic related to our yearly theme. They "teach" the class about something for about 10-15 minutes. It usually involves one of those display boards. Some dress up and feign an accent. Others create demonstrations that the audience may try. Preparing for something like this takes a good bit of time.

Just a couple of ideas...

Suzq
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Joined: Thu Sep 07, 2006 6:04 pm

Unread post by Suzq » Thu May 22, 2008 11:10 pm

Posted: Thu Nov 08, 2007 8:08 pm

I am having my kids make a lapbook about Rome. I do help them with it but your dd could probably do it all on her own. I don't make it up I use a product from hands of a child dot com. They have ancient history lapbooks and I purchased the one on the romans. It is a nice addition to the other things we are doing in RTR Whenever there is not something scheduled I just choose one of the lapbook activities to do that day. I am guessing your dd could make it as detailed and informative as she likes. Plus use her creativity too. Just an idea.

Another idea -- if she doesn't enjoy lapbooking maybe she would enjoy scrapbooking. Or maybe that is too similar to notebooking. But I can picture a beautiful scrapbook on Rome. She could compare Roman architecture to some of the modern places that have copied from the Romans and download and print pictures to use or copy pictures out of books she researches. I don't know -- I was just trying to think of other ways to use those creative juices.

One of the 12 year old girls in our co-op did a slide presentation showing roman architecture and then since they had just been on vacation in Washington DC -- she showed many places in DC that used the style of the romans. It was quite neat to watch. She did a great job. Just another thought.

kellybell
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Unread post by kellybell » Thu May 22, 2008 11:11 pm

Posted: Fri Nov 09, 2007 1:34 am

What to do with her?

CLONE HER and send the clone my way in hopes that it will rub off on my average ones!

First, praise the Lord for the talent, ability, and intelligence He's gifted her with.

She's a "big girl" so ask her what she wants to do. Write a play? Or a novel? Teach younger kids? Create a big oil painting? Or a huge map? Or develop a computer game that is set in a particular time period? Or get a penpal that's similar to her? Keep an eye out for discussions at the library and let her participate. If you have cable or satellite, look for History Channel and Discovery Channel programs that would interest her, etc.

Those are just some ideas, and I like what the other posters say too!

cbollin

Unread post by cbollin » Thu May 22, 2008 11:12 pm

Posted: Fri Nov 09, 2007 7:54 am

Maybe you could add in SOTW AB? We like the AB in SOTW vol. 4 and many times my 12 y.o has to do a lot of that on her own. If it is just a little bit below grade level then it should be easier for her to take charge of. That assumes you're into the part of RTR where SOTW is used. Just line it up by chapter number.

Do you have an Historical Society Museum in town or something like that? Maybe she could do volunteer work for them or something?? Or maybe something along those lines?

-crystal

4Truth
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Unread post by 4Truth » Thu May 22, 2008 11:12 pm

Posted: Fri Nov 09, 2007 3:33 pm

Okay, I'm reading your replies and thinking about them. See, the problem is that this girl is WAY more creative and motivated than her mama! She could do almost anything y'all have mentioned.

Okay, not the computer game, as she's just not that big into computers (yet). And she wasn't interested in lapbooks.

But she IS writing a story set in the Civil War period. She has a penpal who's a lot like her, and they write back and forth about it. Yesterday she wanted to know whether Montgomery, AL, was a small town during the Civil War. (Aacckk! How would I know?) So we had to get on the computer and try to find something, and I pulled out Kingfisher which she practically snatched out of my hands, and well, you get the idea. This girl is exhausting me! She sat down and made a drawstring bag for her sister in an hour the other day... complete with her name embroidered on it. (The impressive part about that is that she didn't learn it from me!)

Kelly, I'm not bragging, I'm freaking out because she's insatiable! But hhmm, maybe I should have *her* teach a week of MFW lessons! LOL.
cbollin wrote:Do you have an Historical Society Museum in town or something like that? Maybe she could do volunteer work for them or something?? Or maybe something along those lines?
Ooohh, wouldn't she love that! We do have a very small one here in town.... but it's so small that I'm not sure there'd be much for her to do! I'll have to think on the idea, though.

I did wonder about the AG because I know it's used in later years. I might take a look through it at the HS bookstore Friday when I take her to outside classes.

dhudson
Posts: 320
Joined: Thu May 10, 2007 5:46 pm

Seeking advice for next year...

Unread post by dhudson » Tue Apr 27, 2010 8:52 pm

wedgett wrote:We are completing our first year homeschooling, I have a Kinder, 2nd and 4th grader. We used the AMFW this year and really enjoyed it. The few gliches we found were that my 2nd grader likes to get his work done quickly and move on. We had a lot of moments where he was waiting for his sister to finish up, things like that.

My question is about next year. I would like to begin the then 5th and 3rd grader in the cycle, but what do I do with my then 1st grader? We found that our day was very long this year. I think part of that was because I was afraid (first year) that we weren't doing enough and I added math, foreign language, complete separate reading program, intense grammar/english, spelling, lapbooks, projects... for the 2nd and 4th graders. I already realize that we could have cut out the lapbooks, extra projects and extra reading. Still worried how to fit it all in...
Wendi :~
If you need to shorten your days make sure you do the basics first - math, LA and MFW and then add in the rest of those things if you have time. Use MFW1 as the "reading and math" curriculum for the 1st grader and let him sit in for the older kids curriculum. You shouldn't need an extra reading program, lapbooks are fun but maybe only pick one or two a year for those topics that you think they will find interesting. You can keep extra projects for Friday if you want and you can always have Dad get involved by having "Science Saturday with Daddy" as needed.

I am speaking form the perspective of someone who is an over-achiever and always plans too much but has learned to make sure we can get the basics done and then can do the extras if we have time with piano, foreign language, sports and church things.
God Bless,
Dawn
http://www.shiningexamples.blogspot.com
blessed Mom of three - 16, 13 & 13
happy user of MFW since 2002

Julie in MN
Posts: 2925
Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 3:44 pm
Location: Minnesota

Re: Seeking advice for next year...

Unread post by Julie in MN » Fri Apr 30, 2010 4:24 pm

Hi Wendi,
I just have some general chat here.
wedgett wrote:The few gliches we found were that my 2nd grader likes to get his work done quickly and move on. We had a lot of moments where he was waiting for his sister to finish up, things like that.
This summer, I'd spend some time figuring out how to approach this differently next year. It depends on whether the 2nd grader needs to be slowed down, to do more careful work, or whether he is doing fine and just has to wait. If it's a matter of his doing a good job but having to wait, then I'd try to figure out a list of things he could do while he's waiting. Maybe his independent reading time and his math problems, or his book basket and cursive practice. There's Bible copywork or math facts practice. He'd still be doing "school" but he'd be getting some independent things done while he waits. And at the very end of the day, he could have a list of "educational activities" or the freedom to develop other ideas when done early: http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=1829

David Hazell also has a talk about developing independent learners, where he mentions different accomplishments of children during free afternoons.
http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=3234
wedgett wrote:We found that our day was very long this year. I think part of that was because I was afraid (first year) that we weren't doing enough and I added math, foreign language, complete separate reading program, intense grammar/english, spelling, lapbooks, projects... for the 2nd and 4th graders.
Well, I see only 2 choices here. (1) Accept the longer day, or (2) cut down on the extras!

Best wishes,
Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

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