Siblings - Giving each child their own Math/LA -- even twins

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melinda
Posts: 15
Joined: Thu May 19, 2005 4:02 pm

Siblings - Giving each child their own Math/LA -- even twins

Unread post by melinda » Tue Sep 04, 2007 9:15 am

I have a set of twins doing first grade work. Here's what we have to do. I do teach them separately. For grade 1, I may introduce/review phonics together with them, but I have two different times for them to read to me. That's when I work on whatever specific concept they need.

For math, they are both in the same book on the same lesson. One child, however, loves the challenge of math, so she also does extra math. This works for her and I don't mind. The other twin does the extra math when she wants. She enjoys a more applicable math such as cooking, figuring out how many plates to set the table for company, etc. So she also gets plenty of math experience.

I'm schooling three girls total and it's very time consuming. But that's how it has to be to ensure that all my girls get a good amount of time from me. They all are learning to be independent learners, but you have to know how to read to be highly independent. Slowly I'm seeing the rewards of my labors as each child reads more and more everyday.

Oh, FWIW, David Hazell was a blessing as he was the only person who told me that I'd have to school them separately. And he was right.
Melinda & Co.
Girls (ages 8 and 7, 7 (ID twins))
Baby boy (1)
www.eagereyesofblue.blogspot.com

RachelT
Posts: 352
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Unread post by RachelT » Tue Sep 04, 2007 2:19 pm

Like someone above, I don't have twins (although my dh is one and we have twin nephews, so I do understand competition!), but my own two dc are under two years apart in age and closer in some areas of their learning. Last year I tried to do a lot of teaching together, but this year I made a schedule or routine so that I could plan for teaching them together and separately. (Which I think is working much better!) Here is how it usually works out:

1) Breakfast, devotion, chore time
2) Bible and read aloud (together)
3) Calendar math binder (calendar, 100 chart, etc.) (together)
4) DS 1st grade Reading, writing, phonics while DD has "choice time"
5) DD K phonics, writing, activities while DS has "choice time"
6) Break
7) Math at the same table, but DS doing 1st gr math and DD doing PreK/K math (although we sometimes work together on the same concept with manipulatives)
8) Activity/other (project, music, art, science, etc.) (together)

This works out so that we do most things together except phonics/reading and math. I am following the sticky note under choosing curriculums called “teaching PreK and K”. Last year, that is what we did and now we are in year two of the sticky which is combining K and 1st. It has helped so much to have individual time with each of them.

“Choice Time” is what I created to give them guided choices in using their “free” time while I am working with the other one. I will give them some choices for the week and they can choose something from that list each day or I might give them a choice of two or three things that day to do. So far choices have included: computer (educational cd-roms or internet sites like Starfall.com), coloring, play doh, Wedgits, play kitchen, lacing alphabet, number pegs and puzzles, dry erase placemats, Leap Pad, etc. We have a computer center in our school area and my dh hooked up little speakers that have a headphone jack so the sound isn’t distracting the other dc and we are all still in the same room.

I hope some of these ideas help to get you thinking about your options! All children are different and I think MFW is designed so that we can work with our children together most of the time, except in reading/phonics and math, so I think it's very doable and it would help relieve some of the struggles.

I am sure that you thought about it before getting your materials, but if the material seems to be the problem, then I wouldn't hesitate to call MFW and see if you need to be using something different.

Rachel
Rachel, wife to Doug ~ 1995, mom to J (17) and B (15)
MFW K (twice), 1st (twice), Adv., ECC, & CtG 2006-2010,
Classical Conversations 2010-2016,
ECC/AHL 2016-17, eclectic 2017-18, WHL & US1 2018-19

http://rachelsreflections-rachelt.blogspot.com/

Lucy
Posts: 442
Joined: Mon Nov 08, 2004 9:37 am

Unread post by Lucy » Tue Sep 11, 2007 1:42 pm

melinda wrote: Oh, FWIW, David Hazell was a blessing as he was the only person who told me that I'd have to school them separately. And he was right.
The above thought was what I would have suggested. MFW suggest that all kids be taught math and language arts separately even if they are twins. Give this a try. You could still have the one who is finding reading easier listen to the bible stories as well as do the bible notebook for beginning composition. If he does not like to draw let him use stickers or cut and paste picture.

Anytime you move from one phonics program to another usually you have to work in the new one for awhile until you find that spot that is new material.

I hope some of this is helpful for you as you are trying to figure out the best plan your twins.

Lucy
wife to Lee and mom to Twila 18 (girl) and Noel 16(boy). Happy MFW user since 2002.

Lucy
Posts: 442
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Unread post by Lucy » Sun Jun 08, 2008 11:28 pm

cbollin wrote:Twins & siblings might benefit from being taught separately for their MFW K phonics worksheets and such. I've not been in that situation.
-crystal
Posted: Tue Jan 29, 2008 5:55 pm
Rachel,
MFW recommends you do this since each child learns differently and will benefit from the one on one time. Teaching them separately also helps to prevent children comparing their progress with each other. It also gives you a better handle on how each child is progressing.

Hope that helps.
Lucy

dhudson
Posts: 320
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Unread post by dhudson » Sat Aug 30, 2008 12:06 am

Posted: Fri Mar 07, 2008 5:02 pm

I have a 9 year old son and 6 1/2 year old boy/girl twins. I can speak to the twin issue.

My twins did MFW1 last year and I had one of them quietly read to themselves while I worked with the other doing the Bible reader. The next day, I switched the order and that seemed to work great.

The other thing I have done is to use rest time (all the kids have quiet time in the afternoon for about an hour) for specialized instruction and rotate the days so that each child gets more one on one time. We have used that time to work on things that they each need specifically.

Using the math games was great for the twins because they could play together and I could work with my older son.

Last year was one of my favorite years as the twins were in MFW1 and my oldest was in CtoG and we blended many of the lessons together.

Hope this helps,
Dawn
http://www.shiningexamples.blogspot.com

KimberlyND
Posts: 67
Joined: Thu Jan 24, 2008 4:55 pm
Location: United States

Spring fever? Need maturity? Other? Penny for your thoughts.

Unread post by KimberlyND » Thu Mar 19, 2009 7:42 am

RBS in OH wrote:It's my DS (almost 7) for whom I'm concerned. He seems to have hit a wall. He's not remembering his subtraction math facts very well (did better last year); he's having a hard time with spelling (even when I daily remind him); he's also struggling with piano, having a hard time "putting it all together". This has been magnified in the last 4-6 weeks. He just doesn't seem to be retaining the information well.

If it were just him, this would seem simpler, but my DD (his twin) is part of the mix. Academically, most things come easy to her. I know that boys and girls typically perform differently at this age. But, if possible, I'd like to keep them on the same level and doing the same things (at least for a while longer). They are both excellent readers, love Bible time together, get excited about Pioneers and Patriots especially, enjoy science, tell me how good the books in Book Basket are,...But with the subjects mentioned earlier, my DS just struggles. I even put in extra short reviews for his sake, but don't tell them why. My daughter doesn't really need it, and sometimes gets a bit bored with it.

So what do you think: Does my son have spring fever? Does he just need to mature? Will a double measure of patience and understanding trigger him to do better? Would eliminating piano lessons be a good idea for him (DD loves it). I'd appreciate the wisdom that any of you may be able share, as it has been weighing on me.
I don't know your individual situation but it sounds so like my DS(7). He, too, really struggled with subtraction math facts, spelling, and reading. I have found that he has got better as this year has gone by. He was 7 last August. I think with him it has mostly been a maturity thing. Still, sometimes his 3 yo little sister can remember more during narration than he does which doesn't sit too well with him.

In reading your post again I noticed that you said he remembered his subtraction math facts better last year. I don't know what to make of that. I know that my ds has waves of greatness and troughs of forgetfulness when I don't know where his head is. I'm sure others will come up with some ideas for you. Just wanted you to know I can relate and I know how frustrating it can be.

Blessings!
Kimberly in ND
MFW user since 2007, gone through K, 1st, ADV, ECC, CtG, RtR, Exp. to 1850, & 1850 to Modern Times
Using ECC 2014-2015 with an 8th grade son and 4th grade daughter
Have been HS for 19 years and graduated 3 dc.

Julie in MN
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Location: Minnesota

Re: Spring fever? Need maturity? Other? Penny for your thoughts.

Unread post by Julie in MN » Thu Mar 19, 2009 8:29 am

KimberlyND wrote:I know that my ds has waves of greatness and troughs of forgetfulness when I don't know where his head is.
This is a beautiful description. My son just last week told me that "everything's getting hard -- history, math, English..." This week, he's been fine. Who knows what's going on in those developing bodies.

Since your son is only 6, he's the same age my kids were in kindergarten, so I don't have much advice for how to make a 2nd grade program work for them. But it really sounds like he's doing fine in ADV, but just having some issues with math facts, phonics, and piano. I would think you could keep them together for the majority of the day & just teach them separately for the basics. Here is the MFW recommendation on that: [above]

As for piano, I didn't start my kids til 3rd grade. As you can see, I have a pattern of preferring to start things later ;)
Julie
Last edited by Julie in MN on Fri Mar 27, 2009 12:08 am, edited 1 time in total.
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
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Travis (32) engineer; never hs

dhudson
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Re: Spring fever? Need maturity? Other? Penny for your thoughts.

Unread post by dhudson » Thu Mar 19, 2009 9:59 am

I have b/g twins who are 7.5 and in 3rd grade. Because they are very young to be in that grade I often just take more time if needed. Now, my issue is opposite of yours , my ds is very studious and my dd is very outgoing and very distractable. So, for things like math and LA, I just separate them if my dd needs more time; that way my ds can still move at a pace that suits him and then I an do a little extra work with my dd. David Hazell suggested that twins be separated for those basics (math, reading and LA) from the beginning and it has worked well for us. One bonus to this is that my dd gets upset with being "left behind" and she decides to work harder and then she catches up and we can introduce the topics together again. I like introducing the topics together and them moving them apart for the actual work. Sometimes just a little one-on-one time works wonders which being twins is sometimes hard to come by.

Make sure at that age to keep lessons short and sweet with movement breaks! Oh and I allow my dd the freedom to NOT sit in a chair or stay still - she just has to stay in a set space. I used to just tape off a square and tell her to stay in her square so that she wouldn't be a distraction to my oldest son or her twin. This works great because she is free to move which somehow helps her to do her work better. ;) A speaker named Debra Bell once told me, "If she's focusing on being still, she can't focus on her work.". This made perfect sense to me and has been a life saver.
God Bless,
Dawn
http://www.shiningexamples.blogspot.com
blessed Mom of three - 16, 13 & 13
happy user of MFW since 2002

RBS in OH
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Joined: Thu Nov 13, 2008 2:34 pm

Re: Spring fever? Need maturity? Other? Penny for your thoughts.

Unread post by RBS in OH » Thu Mar 19, 2009 9:34 pm

Just wanted to say that the last 6 months have been a learning process, as my exposure to MFW and Charlotte Mason methods have been instrumental in convincing me that children don't need to be rushed into a bunch of heavy acedemics as soon as they enter K or 1st gr. I've leaned so much toward "classical education", and still appreciate many aspects of it, but I really have grown to like the way MFW tempers it.

That said, I can't go back, so we will make the best of where we are at. My ds is being stretched more, but we ARE loving ADV and my husband and I are constantly being amazed at how much they are soaking it all up.

I too like what Kimberly said about kids having "waves of greatness and troughs of forgetfulness". It helps me be more at ease about my DS.

Dawn, as you work with your twins, do you still try to cover the same amount of work for both of them in the end? It sounds like you take more time to cover things with your DD if needed, so that they're at they're at the same pace. Do you ever allow your DS to move on, and also allow your DD to cover any less material so that it's more at her pace? ...I just remembered that you said that DD wants to catch up...And didn't know that it's suggested to teach math seperately-thanks for your insights.
Rachel

ds(14) 8) and dd(14) ;)
We've enjoyed ADV, ECC (2 times), CTG, RTR, EX-1850, 1850-MOD--and now AHL this year!

dhudson
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Re: Spring fever? Need maturity? Other? Penny for your thoughts.

Unread post by dhudson » Thu Mar 19, 2009 9:53 pm

I do try to cover the same amount of work bu there have been times when I've let my ds go ahead of my dd but she then gets motivated to move ahead. I think with my dd it's more of a matter of motivation than of understanding so I try to keep her fairly steady. For my dd much incentive is art so to get to do the art project she has to get all of her other work done.
God Bless,
Dawn
http://www.shiningexamples.blogspot.com
blessed Mom of three - 16, 13 & 13
happy user of MFW since 2002

TriciaMR
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Joined: Thu Sep 20, 2007 11:43 am

Writing strands!! I need help or they do! :)

Unread post by TriciaMR » Fri May 29, 2009 9:04 am

overholt wrote:We are doing Level 3, and I realized that my daughter was a little on the young side, so I wasn't pushing her. She is doing better than my son, and that frustrates him. Has anyone tried having them work on their writing strands lessons at different times... we usually work on them together but he seems so caught up in the fact that she can think of sentences more quickly than him. I thought if I could have them work on their assignments at separate times he wouldn't feel like he is in a race.
Having twins... There are times we do things together - like teaching the concept... Then times we work separately - like when doing the work. I have one son who really gets alphabet and sound stuff. The other gets math concepts. So, I do some teaching together, and some separately. I don't want competition between them as much as cooperation...

Posted Wed Jun 09, 2010 11:10 am by TriciaMR

I have twins. The way I do things - teach them together, work with them one-on-one. So, I teach phonics to both of them together, but then they read to me one on one. So with Writing Strands in the future, I can imagine me teaching the lesson together, having them write by themselves, and then coming to me to work with them each on what they wrote.

-Trish
Trish - Wife to Phil, Mom to Toni(18), Charlie(14), and Trent(14)
2014-2015 - AHL, CTG
2015-2016 - WHL, RTR
2016-2017 - EXP1850, US1877
2017-2018 - DE, 1850MOD
2018-2019 - College, AHL
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my3boys
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Re: Writing strands!! I need help or they do! :)

Unread post by my3boys » Fri May 29, 2009 12:09 pm

I have two children in the same grade - one is at his grade level and the other is delayed with LDs. It really started to bother the older child when his younger brother was passing him in some areas - they even started to compete and make comments about whose work was better. They now do all their academics seperately and it works much better.
Alison
Mom to 3 busy boys ages 11, 8, and 6
finished K, First, ECC, and CtG - currently using RtR

Julie in MN
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Location: Minnesota

Trouble in twin-land

Unread post by Julie in MN » Tue Jul 27, 2010 8:55 pm

TriciaMR wrote:Okay, back in May we completed Abeka's K program and continued on in Abeka's 1st. I knew Charlie was struggling, but he was basically reading CVC words and starting to get the CVCV or CVVC words... a little painful, but getting it, and comprehension is there. (Trent, on the other hand, was really getting into it. Not great expression, but he was reading better than Charlie or Toni at that age.) Well, we had this 3 week break here in the middle of summer. We've started back up - still with Abeka's 1st (planning on starting MFW's 1st next week), and poor Charlie is struggling. It's almost like half his brain with regards to reading got erased. Most days he can't remember sounds, he doesn't remember long vs. short sounds, can't stay focused.

Today we reviewed all the sounds of the letters and we worked through it. But, he's doing the same things Toni used to do. He wiggles the whole time he's trying to read. His eyes are looking all over the page at the pictures rather than staying on the words. He guesses. He's constantly pushing, kicking, or bumping me the entire time he's reading to me.

Now, I don't want to repeat K (I've already sold my K curriculum and buying another isn't an option). And he's a twin, and they know they're the same age, and they expect to be doing the same things. I've looked at the first couple of weeks of MFW 1st, and I know it's a good review. The manual suggested slowing those first 12 days down for a struggling kids over 26 days. That'd be great for Charlie, but Trent would be bored (plus, how do you space out the scroll activity if you do that... and the math - our number of the day stuff would be messed up unless we only did it every 4th day!). Plus, he's on level for math (if not advanced).

I'm thinking I'll keep spending 5-10 minutes a day with him reviewing. But, I'm wondering if you all have some other ideas. I do "teach" them together, and have them read to me separately. But, if I need to teach Charlie something different than Trent, well, it's going to take a lot more time, and they're gonna know. Now, sometimes they are really gracious towards each other (Charlie is 2.5 inches taller than Trent, learned to ride his bike without training wheels first, etc., so they know that things don't always happen together) and it makes a mom proud. But, I've seen issues between them that could hamper their relationship and hurt Charlie. I would repeat K if it was just Charlie, but it's not. They're a pair, a team. What should I do?

-Trish
Trish,
I don't have twins (God knew my inabilities), but I work with siblings where youngers can be far ahead of olders. Us tutors always feel like you do and try our best to prevent the younger from passing ahead, but sometimes we just have to. And I'm not saying that the child who is ahead is always gracious about it; sometimes there is a lot of subtle bragging going on. However, I think the slower student knows their academic status, so it really isn't something they are surprised by. In some cases, they are just interested in other things. On occasion, I've seen the tables turn and the slower kid end up head, maybe because we allowed them to work at their level? Think of the Hazell story of their slowest kindergartner who ended up being their most advanced student.

I personally feel it's very important to do math and language arts at the lower levels until they are mastered. I think it's one of the blessings of homeschooling for the child. So my opinion is that you don't move them both ahead. That would leave you with two other options -- hold them both back or separate them.

If you do decide to separate them, then part of your slower student might feel bad, but I think at least a tiny part of him would feel relieved to work at his own pace. I know it's all interwoven in 1st, so teasing out the math/LA for one student will be harder, but by 2nd grade it should be simpler.

If you decide to keep them together at a slower pace, then maybe the faster student can have some other activity to do after you've taught a lesson. I know when my oldest son was in early elementary, he had a teacher who would have him do an extra report on dinosaurs or some kind of computer task, and he was pulled out of class for some kind of activity (one year it seemed to be critical thinking type tasks, another was a unit where they designed a new invention). Then when it came time for evaluating whether my next child should be in that pull-out program, I told the teacher that she was just as able as her brother and the teacher agreed but gently suggested that my daughter didn't seem to need "more."

Just some thoughts by a twinless mom,
Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

TriciaMR
Posts: 998
Joined: Thu Sep 20, 2007 11:43 am

Re: Trouble in twin-land

Unread post by TriciaMR » Tue Jul 27, 2010 10:33 pm

Julie,

Thanks for your different perspective. It is useful to hear how "professionals" handle it.

Yeah, the thing is, I thought he had it mastered - at least reading CVC words... He did, until we took this break... You know, he'll do the writing stuff. He'll love math. He already loves the pattern blocks, and you should see the creative stuff he does with those! He really likes science - last year he loved watching the CTG experiments and helping with those.

Maybe I separate them for just the reading/student workbook stuff. Though, I think some of the student pages might tie in with the reading - I'll have to see. Funny thing is, if I say a sound, Charlie could find the letter. (So, those workbook pages where I say, "Write the first letter you hear in the word book." he would do fine with.) And back when we did K, if I said a word like "run," he could spell it better than Trent! It's going the other way that seems to have hit a road block in his head. Some kind of visual/auditory wiring thing.

Hmmm. I still have my blend ladders I made for K. I have the Spelling letter tiles. I have a few flashcards that I haven't sold off yet. Some kind of intensive review maybe... Maybe try some other learning styles - like sidewalk chalk and have him jump on the letters and say sounds; swing and read flashcards (had to do that with Toni). Keep letting him play with starfall. He's very left-brained (engineer-type) and left handed. The kid can watch his dad put something together, and then he can do it by himself. If there was some kind of puzzle where he put the letter in and the letter made the sound as he put it in, it might help him.

When I had trouble with Toni, I just kept plowing ahead, and she eventually got it, but it was a struggle. Probably somewhere about 3/4 of the way through 1st grade things finally started clicking for her. I just don't want it to be a battle for Charlie. Just gotta figure out what I'm going to do with him.

-Trish
Trish - Wife to Phil, Mom to Toni(18), Charlie(14), and Trent(14)
2014-2015 - AHL, CTG
2015-2016 - WHL, RTR
2016-2017 - EXP1850, US1877
2017-2018 - DE, 1850MOD
2018-2019 - College, AHL
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Cyndi (AZ)
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Re: Trouble in twin-land

Unread post by Cyndi (AZ) » Tue Jul 27, 2010 11:13 pm

I read this earlier and knew better than to even try and chime in. I'm glad Julie was there for you! Talk about two different learners. Maybe I can say "be thankful you've got them at home and don't have a school teacher trying to compare them" without it being too stupid of a statement? You know so much about this stuff - you're always such a big help to everyone else! I will pray for you to get it sorted out. I'm just no help other than that.
2018/19: US1877
used MFW from K through WHL

Julie in MN
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Location: Minnesota

Re: Trouble in twin-land

Unread post by Julie in MN » Wed Jul 28, 2010 2:25 am

Agreeing with Cyndi that praying through it will probably be the answer. Until the answer reveals itself, maybe others with more direct experience teaching MFW 1st or twins will be around. And you have tons of excellent ideas, Trish, for fun review!

The only thing I'd ask is, "Does it have to be 'intensive'?" Maybe to help mom teach twins together, pushing would be worth it. But he's so young that intensive sounds like pressure. Remember, I'm the one whose oldest just STARTED kindergarten at 6, so take it with a grain of salt ;)

Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

Kelly1730
Posts: 92
Joined: Mon Dec 21, 2009 2:22 pm

Re: Trouble in twin-land

Unread post by Kelly1730 » Wed Jul 28, 2010 8:24 am

I have twins so I know the blessing of being able to teach them both together and how much harder and time consuming it would be to do everything separately. So far they are pretty much on the same level but I have thought about what I would do if and when one pushed ahead of the other. (Don't have a plan yet, just have thought about it ;)

That said, when talking with their piano teacher (starting lessons this fall) she recommended that the boys work out of different books for several reasons but one was so they not compare their abilities. And I could totally see this. One doing much better and the other one knowing it and feeling discouraged. Maybe, for a season, you could teach reading from separate curriculum so each would be doing his own thing and not compare with the other. Not easy or frugal, I know. Just a suggestion.

I know that the Lord will lead you to whatever is best for your boys. You are such a loving, caring mom. They are blessed to have you.
Blessings,
Kelly
Mom to 6
Mimi to 8
MFW K, MFW 1st, Adventures, ECC, CTG, RTR ,EXP-1850, 1850-MOD, Ancient History and Lit 2016-17

cbollin

Re: Trouble in twin-land

Unread post by cbollin » Wed Jul 28, 2010 8:44 am

One of the ideas that I think I've heard David Hazell suggest is similar to the idea that Kelly's piano teacher has: teach language arts and math separately, even if they are in the same book.

So, if you have everyone together in RTR stuff, and then just spend 15-30 minutes with each of the boys where they are in language arts and math, and let the fun stuff in 1st be fun stuff in first to do, can that kind of juggling work? Or can they work well together and do they learn from each other sometimes to help review stuff?

other general ideas for reinforcing phonics
there's free stuff online to play like starfall.com
there's paid stuff like time4learning
audio books with the book in front of you can help too

and go back and re-read David's advice when hit plateau in reading:
http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=3313

-crystal

TriciaMR
Posts: 998
Joined: Thu Sep 20, 2007 11:43 am

Re: Trouble in twin-land

Unread post by TriciaMR » Wed Jul 28, 2010 8:59 am

I think he was relying a lot on Trent when we did stuff together. It wasn't helping him, he was just listening to him for the answers. I'll just have to separate them for a while for phonics/reading time. I just was resisting doing that because of how much more time that's going to add to our school day, though it may be faster because I won't be going back and forth between them. I'll have to have things for each of them to do while I work with the other, because if one goes off to play, rather than do "school" type things, then there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth. Toni still needs mom a lot too, especially math and writing.

-Trish
Trish - Wife to Phil, Mom to Toni(18), Charlie(14), and Trent(14)
2014-2015 - AHL, CTG
2015-2016 - WHL, RTR
2016-2017 - EXP1850, US1877
2017-2018 - DE, 1850MOD
2018-2019 - College, AHL
My blog

mgardenh
Posts: 174
Joined: Thu Oct 04, 2007 4:55 pm

Re: Trouble in twin-land

Unread post by mgardenh » Wed Jul 28, 2010 10:04 am

Hey Sis,
As far as Charlie kicking you squiggling when reading how about having him sit on a exercise ball and read or they make these things out of the same material as exercise balls that are flat with a little air in them and when you sit on them they move around. That might help with the wiggles. Laurel also wondered about his eye's. Maybe he has to move around to focus his eye's and see the words. Or maybe the movement is because he is having trouble with his eyes. Just some thoughts. Hope your doing well.

Mike
Mike
DH to Laurel
SAHD (mostly) to
Julia - 10 years old, Explorations to 1850
Alexis-7 years old, Explorations to1850 see her story at
http://www.caringbridge.org/visit/alexisg
Have used MFW, k, 1st, Adventures, and ECC, CTG, RtR

TriciaMR
Posts: 998
Joined: Thu Sep 20, 2007 11:43 am

Re: Trouble in twin-land

Unread post by TriciaMR » Wed Jul 28, 2010 10:11 am

Yeah... Could be... Some of the brain integration exercises focus on eye-tracking, so that may help... He can "see" 20/20 when they do his well check appt... But, I've seen him focus on other stuff that's not reading without any problems... It may be an interest factor, too... The stories are "stories" not about airplanes or trains or cars or how gears work...

-Trish
Trish - Wife to Phil, Mom to Toni(18), Charlie(14), and Trent(14)
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doubleportion
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Re: Trouble in twin-land

Unread post by doubleportion » Wed Jul 28, 2010 11:01 am

TriciaMR wrote:The stories are "stories" not about airplanes or trains or cars or how gears work...
Maybe you can find some easy reader books at the library that are on those topics that might keep his interest a little more?

((((hugs)))) We hit a speed bump, I remember, with reading with our oldest too. We just had to keep trucking through until she really got it. She is very auditory and changing from Hooked on Phonics to Sing Spell Read and Write was a big key for her. We didn't know about MFW back then, so that is not to say the MFW isn't the choice. I'm just saying sometimes you have to find a different way to approach it. It was hard for me because I am so visual that I never struggled with that. Teaching a child with a completely opposite learning style stretches you.

The other thought I had when reading your post was something I had read about gifted children. http://gifteddevelopment.com/Visual_Spa ... er/vsl.htm Don't know if this describes Charlie but maybe it will help, maybe not.

:)
Edie

Julie in MN
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Re: Trouble in twin-land

Unread post by Julie in MN » Wed Jul 28, 2010 11:18 am

Trish,
Not to belabor a point, but I'm going through a bunch of email from the past few days and this caught my eye:
  • Ruth Beechick,
    The Old Schoolhouse Magazine e-letter:
    "A good average age for boys to begin reading is 7 ½. Girls about one year earlier. We bring some of the troubles on them by trying to start too soon. Slowing down will solve most of what we think are problems."
I also thought Ruth Beechick had a great article about learning to read in this summer's TOS magazine. One point was that usually the third reading program works -- because the child is finally the right age! But even more interesting to me was something to the effect that the short-vowel stage (as in MFW-K) is more suitable to a young child's brain, and the more complicated blends are more suitable for an older age?

Okay, I just have a heart for being easy on little boys. But I've probably said that too much :~

Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

Amy C.
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Re: Trouble in twin-land

Unread post by Amy C. » Wed Jul 28, 2010 1:30 pm

Julie in MN wrote:Ruth Beechick,
The Old Schoolhouse Magazine e-letter:
"A good average age for boys to begin reading is 7 ½. Girls about one year earlier. We bring some of the troubles on them by trying to start too soon. Slowing down will solve most of what we think are problems."
I read the same thing this morning and had thought about posting it here, but as it is most of the time I am a note thinker instead of a note writer. I think about doing it but don't get around to it.

I found this to be interesting because my K'er last year who will be a 1st grader this year just turned 6 in July. I have also been following the summer birthday thread. I debated starting him in K last year, but finally decided I thought he was ready to start. My thoughts were that we could always slow down if need be. He seemed to do fine, maybe not hitting it out of the ballpark but not striking out either. So here I am wondering if he is ready to move on to 1st. He kindof vacilates back and forth. At the end of K, he would read very well one day and then the next act like he had never been exposed to reading. I was encouraged at the very end of our K year, but then we have checked out simple short vowel word books from the library over the summer and he seems to struggle. He keeps asking when we are going to start his "new" school work (meaning the 1st grade stuff). He seems very excited, but I am not sure he is ready for it. I keep thinking we will start slow at the beginning of the year, reviewing short vowel sounds and reading simple stories. We will also work on his writing. He is weak in this area also. From there, I will see if he is ready to officially start 1st. I certainly don't want to push him. He may just need to slow down a little. I do see him maturing in other ways. He may just be too young.

I didn't respond to this post originally because I do not have twins and really wasn't sure what to say, but I did find Ruth Beechick's comments helpful for me and thought about this post as well when reading what she had to say and what the other TOS contributors had to say about reading in the Homeschool Minute enewsletter this morning.

Anyway, thanks, Julie, for following through where I only thought about it.

Amy C.

TriciaMR
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Re: Trouble in twin-land

Unread post by TriciaMR » Wed Jul 28, 2010 2:18 pm

Thanks everyone! I think I was just resisting teaching two separate levels. I'll simplify and combine where I can and where it makes sense, but keep them separate for phonics/reading. I think we can do Bible, Math and Science together. We'll do the HWT workbook to keep working on the handwriting.

In a couple of years he'll catch up, and then he'll be the one reading the instruction manuals to his dad while dad puts together the Christmas and birthday toys, instead of me.

Edie, thanks for that link. He's not 100% visual-spacial, some traits, but not all... He actually *remembers* all his "sight words" from K (the, a, of, to and do - which one of those articles said that he wouldn't). I think he wants all his words to be "sight words." My thought, based on reading some of that stuff, is perhaps since I haven't said, "You need to memorize this," he's not taking the time to memorize it - like the sounds and blends. Not sure. (One article said a lot of visual-spacial kids won't take the time to look/listen long enough to get it into their longer term memory.)

We skipped school today and went to a Lionel Train display that wasn't very far away. They loved that, and are now building their own Thomas and Friends display in the basement - making buildings and water towers and whatever else they remember from bricks, blocks, and empty toilet paper and paper towel rolls. I had them talk to the person who set up the display and ask questions about it and they learned all kinds of fun facts about model trains and real trains.

-Trish
Trish - Wife to Phil, Mom to Toni(18), Charlie(14), and Trent(14)
2014-2015 - AHL, CTG
2015-2016 - WHL, RTR
2016-2017 - EXP1850, US1877
2017-2018 - DE, 1850MOD
2018-2019 - College, AHL
My blog

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