Weeks 18-20 Kenya

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doubleportion
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Re: Weeks 18-20 Kenya

Unread post by doubleportion »

Great website with animal coloring pages and beautiful photos from Kenya and Tanzania
http://www.meandmephoto.com/Africa/Africa.html#MENU


Good info about Kenyan food and includes recipes
http://www.africa.upenn.edu/Cookbook/Kenya.html#STEAK AND IRIO
Last edited by doubleportion on Fri Dec 04, 2009 8:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.
doubleportion
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Re: Weeks 18-20 Kenya

Unread post by doubleportion »

This cookie recipe came out of the book Cooking the West African Way by Bertha Vining Montgomery and Constance Nabwire.

Groundnut Cookies
(In Burkina Faso, city-dwelling Christians make these tasty cookies during the Christmas season.)

3 c. (14 oz) finely chopped salted peanuts
3 eggs
1 c. brown sugar, firmly packed
3 tbsp. all purpose flour
1/4 tsp baking powder

Preheat oven to 350. In medium bowl, combine peanuts, eggs, brown sugar, flour and baking powder. Blend well with mixer or spoon. Place by rounded tablespoonful on baking sheet 1 inch apart. Bake for 10 minutes or until lightly brown.

We hope to make them this weekend along with our tapioca pudding and fried plantains.

:)
Edie
doubleportion
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Re: Weeks 18-20 Kenya

Unread post by doubleportion »

We found so many wonderful books for Africa!! This is a very nice picture book.

Emeka's Gift (An African Counting Story) by Ifeoma Onyefulu
printed by Puffins Books @ 1995 Frances Lincoln Limited
ISBN #0-14-056500-0

Summary on back says-"As Emeka travels to visit his Grandmother, he passes through the village market, where he sees lots of things Granny would like- four brooms, five big hats to keep the sun off, six necklaces, seven musical instruments. But with no money, Emeka can't buy Granny a present. Will she understand? Stunning photographs taken in Emeka's southern Nigerian village illustrate this heartwarming story."
doubleportion
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ECC Kenya Tapioca Pudding?

Unread post by doubleportion »

Okay, we made the pudding tonight following the instructions in the Trip Around the World. I used Kraft Minute Tapioca and Dole crushed pineapple in pineapple juice. I like tapioca and pineapple. But even dd, who is not a picky eater, didn't care for it. Experiences? Is that what it is suppose to taste like? Or do we need more detailed instructions? Just tasted very watery and flavorless.
Edie
cbollin wrote:question: did you use the sugar that is called for the recipe? I wasn't sure since you mentioned you used the juice from the can. It doesn't look like it should have much flavor other than the tapioca.
Posted by doubleportion » Sat Dec 05, 2009 9:35 am
Crystal,
Yes, I did put in the sugar that was called for just forgot to mention it. And I did google pineapple tapioca pudding but didn't find much that was helpful.

I did find that Kenyans don't do much in terms of dessert. I think we will try the peanut cookies I posted the recipe for and hope that we have something that we can enjoy.

I will say that the pudding tasted a littler better after sitting in the frig for a while. I even added some liquid stevia and vanilla and that helped a tad but not much. Just tasted like something was missing. Dh and I thought it might make a good filling for a cake or a bowl cake with whipped cream but was kind of bland and not sweet enough by itself. I might do the cake thing and call it Kenyan cake lol.

I do have a recipe for Injera that I thought about trying this weekend. I will post our experiences with the cookies and the Injera if they are successful. I just love to cook and dd and I have had such fun making food for the different countries. I like tapioca so much. I guess we could have followed the basic tapioca recipe on the box and then folded in pineapple. hmmmm
:)
Edie

Postby doubleportion » Mon Dec 07, 2009 9:15 am
Did taste much better after sitting for about 24 hours in the refrigerator.
RachelT
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Re: Weeks 18-20 Kenya

Unread post by RachelT »

Hi! We have really enjoyed our African journey! Here are some favorites.

Books: We are still reading through the David Livingstone book because these YWAM books just take us longer than scheduled, but the kids really look forward to hearing more of it.
We like the book "Honey, Honey, Lion!" by Jan Brett.
We also enjoyed books from the list about Owen and Mzee (a real hippo and tortoise) and we found a website about them and where they live:
http://www.owenandmzee.com

Arts and crafts: The kids each made a mural of the African animals that they colored and cut out from "A Trip Around the World". It was neat to have them "create" their own grassland. I think we might even add more animals from http://www.janbrett.com because she has several coloring sheets of African animals from the "Honey, Honey, Lion" book.
My dd also enjoyed making her own necklace out of a paper plate today and it was a quick and easy craft to make from the Global Art book.
There are also grassland animals to draw in "Draw, write, now, Book eight, Part 2 : Animals of the world, savannas, grasslands, mountains and deserts".
Editing to say that we also had a nice time making the salt/flour dough and creating our own African animals.

Food: We found some plantains at the grocery store today. They were labeled as coming from Guatemala, but it was close enough. We followed a simple recipe in "Cooking the African Way" for "Baked Plantain on the Shell". It was pretty tasty!

Music: We were fortunate to host the African Children's Choir at our church last summer (they are phenomenal!) and we have some of their cd's. One cd we really like is "Devotion". It has a very lively African feel, but has many songs that we were familiar with sung in an African dialect and English like "Here I am to Worship", "Shout to the Lord", "God of Wonders". Of course it also has some new songs and there are lots of other albums. Their website is http://africanchildrenschoir.com/

Games: We have had a lot of fun Mancala games over the last two weeks! It is so much fun! We used buttons and an egg carton and two small dishes at first, then we found an inexpensive Mancala game with the polished stones and a wooden tray. Before finding the game, I just couldn't quite visualize it even after reading the instructions in the TM, so I found this picture with instructions that helped!
http://www.pressmantoy.com/instructions ... ncala.html
(I think there are even video instructions on the internet!)

Learning about Africa has been a delight and I wish we could spend more time on this continent, but we have more traveling to do!

Rachel
Rachel, wife to Doug ~ 1995, mom to J (17) and B (15)
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Julie in MN
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Kenya - TEACHING AN 8TH GRADER the second time thru ECC

Unread post by Julie in MN »

(1) Watching live cams in Africa
If you google "Wildlife Cam Africa" or something like that, you'll find lots of internet sites with streaming video of animals in Africa, such as the various animals visiting a water hole. (Maybe someone already mentioned this?) One of the most active I found was at SportsmansParadiseOnline. Good lighting is more important than color, I think.

[One we enjoyed recently showed how much a baby elephant loves to cuddle! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RKMi9pmDN98 ]

(2) Current events
Most months, the Voice of the Martyrs magazine focuses on a different country. For June 2010, VOM materials focused on Africa: Their magazine, their children's version (Kids of Courage), and their newsletter. Ds added some VOM articles to his current events pages.

(3) Book basket additions
(a) A Boy of Two Worlds/A Girl of Two Worlds,
Two novels by Lorna Eglin, Christian Focus Pub.
The author was a missionary with Africa Inland Mission. We have the boy's story about a Maasai herder who meets missionaries when he must stay in the hospital. There is also a similar story of a girl.

(b) The African Term, by Michael Hagen,
Royal Fireworks Press
A man in his 40's volunteers with the Peace Corps, teaching children in Ethiopia. It is not a Christian mission, of course, but we have several current & former Peace Corps and Americorps volunteers among our family and friends. I wanted to compare and contrast Christian and secular missions with my son, and to discuss the concept of a national worldview that values service.

(c) Water Hole, Around the clock with the animals of the grasslands
DK 24 Hours series.
Colorful illustrations of animals visiting a waterhole at different hours of the day. Similar to watching Africam.

(d) CD: Journey Into Rhythms, by GeoDeo
This CD talks a little about improvising in African music and then has various tracks for trying to match some rhythms and then improvise with them. We had fun pounding on the table together for a few days, and my 3 yo grandson was ecstatic when he got to join in on the clapping & stomping parts :)

(e) Journey Into Africa, by Jansen
(student resource book)
I splurged and bought this big resource book for Africa. I found Africa to be hard to keep straight the first time through ECC and was ready to dig in this time. I didn't use this book very fully but thought I'd mention the parts we did use.
--Unit with overview of Africa - this is very similar to things already scheduled in ECC. But I love their map of the distribution of different religions throughout Africa, not just the dominant ones. I was glad my son could see that there have long been Christians in Africa. We had a good discussion about why different areas might have ended up differently.
--Several units studying each region of Africa - We reviewed how Northern Africa has actually been more a part of the Mediterranean history we've read about than we realized. The East Africa unit has a nice travel journal of a couple from Kenya, as well as a description of very early Christianity in Ethiopia. The West Africa unit covers some tribal history and of course slavery.
--Units on animals & art projects - we just read a bit about elephants at some point when they came up in our conversation, but otherwise didn't use these units.


Interesting links -
If you scroll to the bottom of this brochure that we got at our Science Museum,
there is a page full of interesting Fast Facts about crocodiles, camels, and hippos (page 17).
http://www.nilefilm.com/motn_ed_guide.pdf
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
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mommccoy
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Movie/Video ideas

Unread post by mommccoy »

My kids and I enjoyed watching the movie, "The gods Must Be Crazy". It's an old movie with a lot of slapstick comedy in it. You meet the Bush people of the Kalahari Desert. As for all media, I advise previewing it first. There are some shooting scenes with machine guns and bazookas, to name a bit of the issues that may need "parental guidance".

We also enjoyed watching "Meerkat Manor" episodes from the library. It is an excellent documentary produced by Animal Planet that follows the lives of a meerkat family living on the edge of the Kalahari Desert in South Africa.
doubleportion
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Music Idea for ECC Africa weeks

Unread post by doubleportion »

I just wanted to share another Selah song that would be great to listen to during the Africa weeks of study. I will post this on the ideas board too.

Every Selah album has atleast one song sung in an African language, usually in Congolese. The song on Bless the Broken Road CD is called "Follow Jesus (Landa Yesu)" it is a duet sung by Todd Smith and Nicole C Mullen. Below are excerpts from liner notes on this song written by Todd Smith.

"My parents have been missionaries in Congo, Africa for about 30 years. They started 3 Bible colleges and have seen more than 300 pastors graduated from the program. They recently put up a radio tower at the mission station of Nkara where I grew up. We have received testimonies from witch doctors getting saved and are now converting their villages to believers gathering in their churches every morning before work and having devotions listening to the teaching on the radio. I grew up in the state of Bandundu. Bandundu has no identity other than being the most populous state in Congo. My dad wants their identity to be 'Bandundu bantu ya bible,' which means 'Bandundu, people of the Bible.' Nicole C. Mullen is someone I have known for many years..... We wrote this song specifically for the radio station at Nkara and for the people out there who will probably live until they are 30 or 40 years of age. In the bridge, you will hear me saying a bunch of African words. I'm calling out to specific villages and cities all around Bandundu asking them to follow Jesus and get into God's word. ...."

Very cool song!

:)
Edie
momtogc
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ECC Vocab - meander

Unread post by momtogc »

We are on Week 18 of ECC and one of the vocab words is meander. In the definition it also describes an oxbow lake. Our favorite lake in our home state of Arkansas is Lake Chicot, which is an oxbow lake. It was once a part of the Mississippi River and is the largest oxbow lake in North America. Google maps shows the lake very clearly and it's very neat to look at online, a great visual. :)
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1974girl
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Africa

Unread post by 1974girl »

For those of you doing Africa...I found a website for a zoo in RI with a live giraffe cam. They have a baby giraffe, too. They have special facts about giraffes, too. We were on it today and kept the live cam up. Of course, we were checking it every so often and sure enough, the baby walked in.
http://rwpzoo.org/what_to_see/giraffe_cam.cfm
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Poohbee
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Re: Weeks 18-20 Kenya

Unread post by Poohbee »

A wonderful book to add to your study of Kenya is 14 Cows for America, by Carmen Agra Deedy, in collaboration with Wilson Kimeli Naiyomah. This lovely picture book is the true story of a young man named Kimeli who is of the Maasai people and grew up in a village in Kenya. He travels to America to study and is in New York City during the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. He returns to his village and tells his people the story of the terrorist attacks. To the Maasai people, "the cow is life." Kimeli has finally saved enough money to own his own cow, and now he wants to offer it to America as a gift of compassion and healing. Others in the tribe also offer their cows as gifts, and the tribe gives 14 cows to America. The book ends with the line, "Because there is no nation so powerful it cannot be wounded, nor a people so small they cannot offer mighty comfort." After I finished reading this book to my kids, I just said "Wow!" It is such a beautiful picture of the compassion and generosity of the Maasai people. The illustrations are beautiful. It's a book you don't want to miss!
Jen
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jasntas
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Re: Weeks 18-20 Kenya

Unread post by jasntas »

I found an inexpensive animals DVD in Target one day so I picked it up. It's part of a series called 'Animal Atlas'. This DVD is entitled 'Animal Passport'. This particular DVD has segments about animals from Africa, Australia and Asia. One thing I really like about the DVD is that the beginning of each segment gives a brief geography lesson and shows a map of the area or areas the animals are from. (I also have this DVD posted on the China and Australia section of the board.)
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asheslawson
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Global Positioning Project - Week 20 Kenya (ECC)

Unread post by asheslawson »

We really had fun doing the global positioning project, but I guess I am not quite up to all of this! Anybody else struggle with converting miles per hour to how many miles they would travel per minute. I'm great with the math once I know the correct equation - but I just didn't figure it out. Clearly - 120 mph would be 2 miles per minute! Which leads me to believe that 200 mph would be 3.33 miles per minute.

This means that the plane that travels 160 miles per hour would make it to destination by 9:30 with 15 minutes to spare (Cessna 210). This is the correct answer per the TM. But the Cessna 208, would arrive in 78.05 minutes (factoring in the 30 minutes at their 1st stop), a little before 9:20 a.m. Both could seat all of the passengers, the Cessna 208 would seat several additional passengers & the Cessna 210 would only seat 1 additional after the pilot is factored in. The Cessna 210 would not need any extra gas and could make it with what was in it's tank. The Cessna 208 would need to carry 2 extra gallons to have EXACTLY enough fuel, but it's weight capacity was MORE than enough to allow extra cans @ 4,000 pounds.

My question is: couldn't the correct answer be Cessna 210 or Cessna 208? The worksheet asks "Which plane should he choose?" My 10 yr old & I arrived at the answer that matched the guide, the Cessna 210, due to consideration that it would probably cost more money to choose the Cessna 208 with too much capacity for weight, seats, etc. However - my 17 yr old ds argued that we could logically choose the 210 OR the 208 - since the goal was to get Suzie to her stop on time for her to not miss her bus. Both did, but the 208 allowed her even more time. He said the worksheet did NOT ask us to factor in the consideration of money & that if we had a similar question on a 'standardized test' we would not be correct for choosing the most economical plane unless the question directed. (He is public schooled as he is a senior and this is my 1st yr homeschooling - he is very accustomed to standardized tests and such - he scores very high on them - so he's probably right about the way they score these things.)

My argument to him is that this is a missionary, flying for MAF - and because of that - money would naturally be a consideration. He said that is fine - but in the 'real world' - we would be overruled because only the factors stated could be part of our consideration. Therefore - he said there are two correct answers - Cessna 210 & Cessna 208. Any insight? This definitely made for some fun conversation around our kitchen table this afternoon!
"So then, just as you received Christ Jesus as Lord, continue to live in Him" Colossians 2:6
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cbollin

Re: Global Positioning Project - Week 20 Kenya (ECC)

Unread post by cbollin »

What a fun way your family has approached the problem. I can believe it would be a fun discussion around the kitchen table. I was enjoying reading it. It is a real world problem and one that my dad deals with a lot as he is a private aircraft pilot.

There is only one answer. the 210. Just ask this.... which plane can go the distance. only 2 of them can, but one one of those 2 can carry the weight.

It can't be the Cessna 208 because it will not have enough fuel to actually get to the final destination. The problem states they will not refuel at first stop. It can carry 30 gal, but at 5 miles per gal. it can only go 150 miles before needing more fuel.
But the total distance to the final city, is 160 miles.
so it can't be the 208.

also, it can't be the 206, it can only go 120 miles on one tank.

The 185 can go the distance, but it can't carry the needed weight.

So, that means it better be the 210. and then, if you want, you can check the time factor.

But I enjoyed listening to how it went around your kitchen table. I'd definitely be in the process over product camp on this specific problem instead of "the right" answer.
asheslawson wrote: It was a great lesson in real life considerations and economics. Thanks for letting me know about your dad's employment - I think I'll add in some of those factors today to remind them that commercial flights probably have many more things they consider when choosing their aircraft.

I was just wanting to make sure that there could be two "correct" answers. I assumed that they could refuel with the extra cans they could carry since the 208 could carry plenty of extra with it's high weight capacity, but it should have needed only 2 cans to travel the last 10 miles. It could fly 150 miles on it's fuel tank, but I estimated the total trip @ 160 miles, meaning he could have added a minimum of two gallons @ his stop in Comoyagua, after 40 miles of flying. This is probably where we got off track in reaching the correct answer. I don't know much about flying - so I assumed they could refuel @ their first stop if they carried extra cans of fuel, which was 40 miles from their departure point. I assumed the final destination was just where he could refuel from a 'station' persay, which was 120 miles from his first stop.
Right. None of the planes have an ability to transport extra AV fuel to the first stop nor to refuel there. So, that wouldn't be a factor.

It's not like having a gas can in the trunk. In other words, there was no way to tips the tops, or is top the tips? LOL
asheslawson wrote:Thanks Crystal! See - I love this! Never did I know that before - like I said - I do not know much about aircraft! I love being able to get help from you guys when I am unsure! It helps me teach my kids better. None of us know everything - but with you guys - I have a place to turn with my questions!!
and who knows? maybe because of the way you and your family are creative with solutions, it will lead to other ideas down the road for new ways to solve bigger stuff. I mean.. when reading the Nate Saint book, who knew that all of that pencil twirling he did would help deliver packages on the ground?

just because the technology and all of that isn't there today to do the mid stop refuel, maybe, just maybe, one of your children will grow up to see a new way to do it that helps many?

never know about this stuff.... so keep those kitchen table talks going. It's the real beauty of homeschooling.

-crystal
Last edited by cbollin on Thu Mar 31, 2011 8:02 am, edited 1 time in total.
jasntas
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Re: Weeks 18-20 Kenya

Unread post by jasntas »

Another DVD we enjoyed is in the National Geographic Really Wild Animals series. It's called Swinging Safari and 'takes you on a wild African safari'.
Tammie - Wife to James for 27 years
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The days of a mother are long but the years are short.
jasntas
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Re: Weeks 18-20 Kenya - Colorful Basket Project

Unread post by jasntas »

While studying Kenya the kids made fabric bowls or colorful baskets as they're called in the Global Art book. We cut up 2" (approx.) strips of fabric. Turned a bowl upside down. Put saran wrap over the bowl. Dipped the squares of fabric in the half white glue/half water mixture. Squeezed off the excess by slipping the squares between two fingers. Let them dry.
Fabric Bowls 2011.jpg
Fabric Bowls 2011.jpg (32.61 KiB) Viewed 12454 times
Tammie - Wife to James for 27 years
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ADV & K 2009-2010 . . . RTR (again) & WHL 2016-2017
http://tammiestime.blogspot.com/
The days of a mother are long but the years are short.
cbollin

Global Art--Substitute Ivory (Africa) help

Unread post by cbollin »

far above rubies wrote:We're having issues with this project. Has anyone else done it?

We let our soap soak in the water for 3 hours and it's nowhere near soft enough to really mold. Anyone have a different experience? Are we using the wrong kind of soap? Do were have a different thought on what "molding" actually means?
in the weird case a little extra info might help someone out there... basically, the craft is asking to soften a bar of soap (probably "ivory" or other white in color soap") and then shape the softened bar into a shape or figurine.

so, how do people make soap at home into those cute little molds that you see at hobby lobby and places?
that's basically what's up, right?

Well, I didn't do this project. so I don't have advice how to do it with a bar of soap. I'm not sure that soaking a bar of soap in water in a bag will make it more pliable? I can see carving the bar. My middle daughter got to make some soap stuff at a birthday party once.

but... why not rethink this? Go to the store and get some "white chocolate", melt it and pour it into some kind of shape/muffin tin/ something... and have it for dessert tonight? certainly there is something in the left over aisle from Christmas stuff or in the new section with Valentine day to make some candy molds? it would be great if it were in an animal shape and go with the theme? or you could shape it in the outline of the continent...


I'm looking at ideas online...
most of making soap balls or molds.... the soap is grated first, then soaked until soap, then you mush it together into a shape and let it dry. I'm in a bizarre mood right now and just might try it the way Global Art describes it.

-crystal
mommasue
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Re: Global Art--Substitute Ivory (Africa) help

Unread post by mommasue »

I never softened the ivory, just gave knives out and they whittled the ivory, i think they made bears... just like whittleing wood, we used old leathermanns from my army days. kids were young, it was fun as I remember, they they took baths with their creations.
love, sue
Sue
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rebeccal2002
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Re: Global Art--Substitute Ivory (Africa) help

Unread post by rebeccal2002 »

eta: i think i'm confusing this project with the other soap craft. (the inuits) [Canada] i skipped the 2nd soap craft because the 1st soap craft was enough.) sorry. :)

we used lever soap (it was white and we had quite a few bars of it in the cupboard). it was the messiest craft we did. we just carved it up and made bears. there were soap flakes every where. it wasn't my favorite, but the kids had fun. clean up was a bit of a chore. we had them put the soap bears in the shower for them to use up. :)

sorry you're having trouble. i don't think those bars of soap would have softened up like play doh, not ever. :)

rebecca
HS'ing since 2006, MFW since 01/2011 :)
2015/16: ECC (2nd time around w/ 3rd, 6th and 8.5 grader), WHL (10th). Also 2nd half of K and 1st for 6 year old.

Finished K, 1st, ECC, CTG, RTR, Exp-1850, 1850-MOD, AHL

and 4 year old helping!
cbollin

Re: Global Art--Substitute Ivory (Africa) help

Unread post by cbollin »

on the carvings....
That's in the Canada part. p. 121
if it would help with instructions for that...


any ideas on the project on p. 23 ?
so far all I have is soapy water and that bar is not get squishier.

-crystal
Julie in MN
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Re: Global Art--Substitute Ivory (Africa) help

Unread post by Julie in MN »

I wonder if the writer used something like Dove or other "complexion bars" where the bar of soap gets quite mushy quickly? Otherwise, I'd just say to give it more time. Eventually almost all bar soap seems to become mush if I leave the dish too close to the shower spray.

I'm puzzled, though. Ivory the elephant tusk isn't molded like clay, is it? Are you certain it's supposed to get wet enough to mold?

Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
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jasntas
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Re: Global Art--Substitute Ivory (Africa) help

Unread post by jasntas »

Our's never got squishy enough either but the kids still had fun. We used Signature (Costco brand) but I think maybe Dove or Ivory may have worked better. Our lesson was that not everything works even when directions are followed. :)

We also did the soap carving. My kids really enjoyed that one, especially my ds. He still wants to learn how to whittle but has yet to gain the patience. :)
Tammie - Wife to James for 27 years
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sandi
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Re: Global Art--Substitute Ivory (Africa) help

Unread post by sandi »

Crystal,
I really like the chocolate recipe!!! I'm thinking this sounds good. Think we'll give it a try. Chocolate is a good idea ALWAYS!! :-)
His Child,
Sandi
far above rubies
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Re: Global Art--Substitute Ivory (Africa) help

Unread post by far above rubies »

Yes, in the end, I gave them both a couple of butter knives and they went to it! :-)

Main point is that they had fun, so all was well. :)
K (2007-2008, 2011-2012), ADV (2010-2011), ECC (2011-2012)
2012-2013: CtG [dd (5th), ds (3rd), dd (1st), ds (3), and ds (1) ]
cbollin

Tanzania.. .Masai.

Unread post by cbollin »

Missionary Gary Woods was recently featured on a PBS video segment (about 8 minutes in length)
(this should help find it. add the http and www stuff )

pbs.org/wnet/religionandethics/episodes/july-6-2012/converting-the-masai/11685/

Gary has worked among the Masai for at least 25 years. nice guy. I got to meet him several times in real life... kinda neat to see him on video like this :)
nice video on his work there and glimpse into life of the culture. one advanced "warning"... it doesn't go into detail on circumcision but for 10 seconds around 4:50 mark to 5:01.. preview that or talk over it.. or just be prepare to explain that. I know in some families that might be something to not watch. just advance info for suitability in your family.
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