Story of the World 4

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Tracey in ME
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1850-MOD - Story of the World 4 helps

Unread post by Tracey in ME » Sun Mar 13, 2011 4:31 pm

Story of The World review questions -- as a worksheet?
Winni wrote:Has anyone ever had their child do these questions in the activity book by writing them down (not orally)? I am wanting to do this and finding it a pain to type them all up. Please tell me that someone somewhere has already done this and I can use theirs....?
Actually, I just found out that this exists
The Story of the World: History for the Classical Child: The Modern Age: Tests and Answer Key (Vol. 4)
and bought it! Problem solved. ;)
- Tracey
Mother of six (16, 13, 9, 7, 4, and 15 months)
2006 - Present - My Father's World
2001-2005 Sonlight

Our blog: http://traceys-journal.blogspot.com/

SimplyKim
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Re: Story of The World review questions -- as a worksheet?

Unread post by SimplyKim » Mon Mar 14, 2011 8:35 am

I've used those with my oldest to supplement another program. I think the Peace Hill Press store sells downloadable versions as well. :)
Married to a wonderful DH and mother to:
DD 13 SL Core 6 & LA, MOH 2, Astronomy, TT Pre-Algebra, Grammar Ace, Wordly Wise
DS 11 & DD 9 ECC, Spectrum English & Spelling, TT 4 & 5,
Everybody Rosetta Stone Italian

HSmommi2mine
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Re: Story of The World review questions -- as a worksheet?

Unread post by HSmommi2mine » Mon Mar 14, 2011 9:47 pm

The tests are not the same as the review questions but they may serve your purposes just fine. I have some typed up for SOTW 3 as short answer sheets, but not every chapter.
~Christina

Wife to my favorite guy
Mom to 3 great kids

cbollin

Story of the World 4

Unread post by cbollin » Thu May 26, 2011 12:43 pm

Winni wrote:I'm looking for suggestions to help my 6th grade daughter retain some of the fact from Story of The World 4. It is a lot of info in each chapter...and I know she isn't retaining much. I've been having her listen to the CD and then write a page about what she heard, but...sigh...that isn't going very well.
What is her best ways of remembering other things?

*does she like to sing
*tell the story back
*act the stories out with props
*draw an item

When it comes the Activity book in volume 4, are you letting her listen ahead of time for one or two of the questions, then asking her answering them as you go along in the reading?

what things are you doing while the CD is on? not judging you... just trying to get bigger picture of ideas.... if you there and have the questions from the activity book and hear the point on the cd where it is addressed, can you pause the CD and underline part of the actual book, or at least with her finger "underline" it

What ways is she engaged for recall of information away from school? Those will be natural hints for the first ways to try.

I know with my 6th grader in volume 3, I had out maps, or at least the map at beginning of chapter of SOTW. I would be a stage performer to help her see the action in the story. WE'd have books like Usborne history thing out (oops.... I should know the title better giggle giggle), or something colorful to look at.

My kiddo couldn't remember all of the details about the England history this year in sotw 3, but when we got to the part where QE1 tossed Sir W. Raleigh in the tower of london, I realized, wow.. my kid remembered this was a common place that kings (and queens too) tossed their enemies. what was it that made her remember that? The art history postcard pictures and other pictures of the missing princes.

It's going to be ok if a 6th grader doesn't retain tons of info in SOTW vol. 4. They are hearing the information, knowing that there were some big wars in recent times and a few things here and there.

does any of that seem to apply? or make sense? or not helpful at all?
Winni wrote:I haven't been reading the stories to her. She's been listening to the CD's. I've been a bit busier with a new baby these days. We adopted...in case I failed to tell you. The LONG chapters just don't stay retained in her (or me, for that matter...when I WAS reading them to her). We're both a bit ditsy, maybe. :~

Let me add more about her: I started her about a year later than my others (6 instead of 5)...she was NOT ready to sit still and do kindergarten at age 5. I'm starting to wonder if it is that she learns a different way or something. I struggle between wanting to push her...and knowing her limits in what she can do. I am constantly...like EVERY DAY dealing with her not doing things correctly. Laundry, cleaning her room up...always needing to redo things...NOT because she's not able...but because she rushes.
Is it that she can't seem to interact with you and the material at the same level that your oldest could at that age?
that was a big adjustment for me. kate (oldest) could interact and sound like a little professor with any topic. So I got scared from using things with Anna (middle gal). Well, turns out that middle gal just interacts differently with the same materials.

The only advice I really have is to use the books instead of the books using you. They are tour books, but you are on a flexible vacation/field trip. You don't have to listen to each word the paid tour guide says.

-crystal

Julie in MN
Posts: 2925
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Re: Story of the World 4

Unread post by Julie in MN » Thu May 26, 2011 3:52 pm

Winni,
We found the activities in the SOTW4 Activity Book to be good links for a kid. In the activities, ds was doing or learning something easy and then saying, yeah, that was part of what we read about! I remember doing the Florence Nightingale physical exam stuff to interact with the Crimean War, and doing the golden spike thing to interact with the railroad, and the Enfield rifle bullets in a paper towel tube to help connect with the military advances, and ds even did the red/white yarn bracelets to connect with something over in Yugoslavia or some such place.

I know you're a busy mom, but some of the activities could just be read to her, even if you don't do all the fun parts. You could read about how kids exchange bracelets somewhere. Then she could have the option of doing those fun parts on her own. It might help make some connections for her.

The other thing we started in SOTW4 was taking notes as ds listened to the CD. Nothing big, just a word now & again sometimes. Ds is a lackadaisical kid, too. I really needed him to at least *begin* paying attention to a few details by 6th or 7th grade.

Just some random ideas,
Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

cbollin

1850MOD?

Unread post by cbollin » Fri Sep 16, 2011 7:56 pm

Magpearson77 wrote:We just completed week four. I have an 8th and 4th grader using this. Everything is going well, except the scheduled SOTW things.

My kids are not retaining much from the readings when we do the review questions and the outlining. I know it is still early in the year and there will be a learning curve, but I thought at the very least my oldest would have no trouble. Last year she had great comprehension and written narrations. I feel like I am always spoon feeding them the answers, which causes me frustration and discouragement. Today when we completed the outline for the Taiping Rebellion, instead of me giving them the answers, I would reread the sections that would answer the points. This seemed to help. Does anyone have any other advice or insight?
it's been 4 years..... but what I remember doing is having the outline page in front of my oldest. That way she knew what to listen for. We answered as we went along.

With the review questions, I would read them ahead of time to myself. I would ask the questions along the way.
But for the outlining -- definitely ok in my house to look at the text for that.

so for retention of the stuff... I just broke it up into smaller sections and asked as we went along. That's what I remember... hmmm..
Magpearson77 wrote:Thanks, Crystal. I think I will use those ideea. I also think some of the problem is laziness and not paying attention. I am going to work on those issues.
Yes, it’s possible that it’s a lazy day or attitude. I know it must be frustrating if a skill set seems to go backwards after last year. Maybe it’s a bad week of the month kind of thing for her brain? (((hugs))) as you figure out the root of it all. (((hugs)))

A few more random thoughts popped in my head. Maybe these are part of the picture. Maybe they are not. But for whatever reason, I was thinking a bit more on it in general terms. Maybe it was an excuse to stop laundry for the minute. wink wink.

For some learners (of any age), they don’t always learn the best via an auditory only method.
SOTW volume 4 had a LOT of information in each chapter. Remember to use maps (or atlas books from ECC if you have them), or globes, or something like that. Maybe with the names, some children need visual aids (dolls, puppets, stuffed animals, craft sticks with faces drawn on them.... yes, I'm done that too)

Some children, can retain more if they are doing something with their hands while someone is reading – even at 8th grade. I mean, even now, my 10th grader will crochet while watching instructional dvd’s. It’s kinda weird, but she remembers most of it that way, but not everything. Some details still have to be looked back and found.

My middle gal, 7th grade, has to have the book in front of her for facts and listen along. She has just recently really been able to follow along with a long novel out loud without having to had the text in front of her. I’m happy dancing. I didn’t think that would happen. She missed some key points, but seems to know when to stop me and say “wait, I’m lost.”

Also, with your 8th grader, is it possible that the lazy thing is part of a bad time of day when energy levels are lower? Their bodies are growing again, and some days, I tell ya, I feel like they are toddlers again. And yes, even my really good auditory learner has those days where I wonder… where did her brain go? then some days, I'm sure she's back on this planet. ;)

I just know that I struggle with auditory based teaching methods no matter how hard I try to pay attention. I can’t do audio books for example unless the book is in front of me and even then, not always. And I can’t seem to process information when others read to me. I can follow when they talk, but when they read out loud? Just may as well shoot me or something. once upon a time, I could.. but

Can your 8th grader remember more if she gets to do the reading out loud to you and 4th grader?
I don’t know if any of that will help. I know those kinds of things helped in our family.

I have a pile of laundry to tell everyone to start “laundry wars!”. It’s our way of doing laundry together.

-crystal

Julie in MN
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Re: 1850MOD?

Unread post by Julie in MN » Fri Sep 16, 2011 9:24 pm

When we did the outlines, I started playing SOTW on CD and keeping an eye on my outline, stopping it when I knew he had something to fill in. Might be harder to keep an eye on both things if you're reading aloud.

Yes, that was kinda spoon feeding. I preferred to look at it like I was modeling :) Then in 9th grade, when he started having to answer questions about the Notgrass textbook, he handled it similarly -- had the questions open while he read, and typed up the answers as he went thru the text. He wasn't able to retain everything until the end of the chapter and answer them all then, and he didn't want to go thru the chapter twice, so that's how he handled it in 9th. We haven't started the Notgrass assignments in 10th yet, so it will be interesting to watch whether he takes a step up. I do know that in 11th, the BJU textbook will force a step up with the quizzes.

I may be too lenient with my youngest child, but really I wonder how much a human being can retain when we've heard something only once. I looked at the outlining as a "part of learning" the material, rather than a "test of what's already learned."

HTh,
Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

Magpearson77
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Joined: Fri Feb 18, 2011 6:09 am

Re: 1850MOD?

Unread post by Magpearson77 » Fri Sep 16, 2011 10:09 pm

Thanks again, Crystal. You gave me more to ponder.

Julie, thank you for reminding me that it is a skill process and not a test process. Paraphrasing, of course :-)

dstj
Posts: 4
Joined: Thu Dec 02, 2010 4:33 am

Re: 1850MOD?

Unread post by dstj » Sat Sep 17, 2011 6:58 am

It looks like your question has already been answered but I thought I'd share what we do too. I know it is not what is written to do - but it works for us. I have my 8th grader read her history to herself. I need to read to myself to understand stuff - I don't even get out as much if I'm reading out loud to someone as when I just read to myself. But the main reason we do this is because I cannot read everything with her with my 3 little ones. I used to feel guilty about this and wish I could but now I can see the advantages too.
So this year now that there are the review questions and outline & map work - I also do not do this with her. But since they have the the answers right there because it is meant to do orally I have to write the questions out for her - which makes more work for me - and more work in a way for her since she has to write them. But it is a lot less frustrating for both of us because I can write them when I get a chance - sometimes when the little kids are in bed or busy doing something - and then I'm not asking her questions and she is looking at me with a blank stare like she has never heard of such a thing before and the kids are screaming all around us - we tried that back when we were doing Sonlight. So I also think it is fine to use as one more learning tool - it is good if she has to look back in the book - maybe that will help her learn it better than even if it was oral and I had to just give her the answer.
(We are doing the activities together:))

cbollin

Re: 1850MOD?

Unread post by cbollin » Sat Sep 17, 2011 6:59 am

Julie in MN wrote: I may be too lenient with my youngest child, but really I wonder how much a human being can retain when we've heard something only once. I looked at the outlining as a "part of learning" the material, rather than a "test of what's already learned."
more just chatting out loud. not that it matters, but I don't think that's too lenient. oh no.. can't have that with you and me can we? we do similar stuff with an oldest and youngest? no no no.. this is all wrong. giggle snort (laughing at you and me over the years.. giggle) Part of what my oldest does is stop along the way, discuss, yells back at the book or whatever, keeps going. it's processing.

When I was in high school, 10th grade World History.... our teacher took us through the process of outlining, and he paused to make sure we were taking notes. And we were the college bound class. But I can remember him even saying things like "this is number III on your own outline." I remember parts of that class. He insisted on starting world history with creation - at least the best way that a teacher could in public schools. and of course, he had a totally different perspective on Vietnam.. he was there, and lost his leg. and he was a football coach, and part time bouncer at his dad's bar/restaurant.

and I like the way you put it: the outline is not a test, but is part of helping to learn and absorb the material.

oh.. coffee's ready and oh my.. no one let the cat back in last night. I should go be me instead of being on here. and someone else posted while I was typing. I like that post too.

-crystal

Magpearson77
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Re: 1850MOD?

Unread post by Magpearson77 » Sat Sep 17, 2011 8:36 am

Thank you for sharing how it works in your home, dstj. If I didn't have my fourth grader, I would have my oldest use SOTW the same way.

Anyone else want to share how they used it?

Julie in MN
Posts: 2925
Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 3:44 pm
Location: Minnesota

Re: 1850MOD?

Unread post by Julie in MN » Sat Sep 17, 2011 1:07 pm

Okay, I don't want to monopolize the thread, so I hope others do chime in!!! But I'm feeling awfully chatty today and avoiding my work cleaning the basement :) So here goes more...
dstj wrote:So I also think it is fine to use as one more learning tool - it is good if she has to look back in the book - maybe that will help her learn it better than even if it was oral and I had to just give her the answer.
cbollin wrote: we do similar stuff with an oldest and youngest? no no no.. this is all wrong. giggle snort (laughing at you and me over the years.. giggle) Part of what my oldest does is stop along the way, discuss, yells back at the book or whatever, keeps going. it's processing.
I notice that we seem to do similar things (and as Crystal said, when her oldest dd and my way youngest ds do things the same, that's saying a lot!). We let our kids "digest" the info along the way. And I started to remember back to a big adjustment I had to make in using the SOTW outlining method.

The thing is, the outlining in the SOTW Activity Book is not simply a natural progression from narration to some kind of "organized narration in outline form." That's where I had trouble, I think. I thought it would be the same thing, and I probably *wanted* it to be the same thing. I thought it would be thinking over the whole picture and organizing the main points in your mind. It took me a little while to realize that wasn't what SWB was doing in that particular outlining exercise. I actually can copy-paste something I posted back when I was in your shoes:

What I "thought'" a SOTW narration/outline would look like:
1. Intro about wars between rich & poor (first 2 paragraphs)
2. Quing dynasty info (next 2 paragraphs)
3. Changes in the country of China causing a very poor class (next 3 paragraphs)
4. The emergence of Hong & his beliefs (next 4 paragraphs)
5. The early actions of the God Worshippers (next 3)
6. The politics of the Taipings (next 3)
7. Conquering Nanjing & Shanghai (next 5)
and so on

What the Activity Guide outline for the same chapter starts with:
1. China faced 3 problems (found in paragraphs 5-7)
2. The Taiping army did 3 things as it marched north (found in paragraph 18)
and so on

Okay, so the first thing for me was to realize that the SOTW outlining was "not" the kind of overview that we were used to with narration & notebooking. Instead it was (1) yes, learning to outline & organize info, but (2) maybe learning to do a different type of thing with a text, which is finding the details.

One time when this really clicked in my brain was when I tutored a young man in order to prep for the ACT test. In the reading section of the ACT, students read a dense piece of text (4 different types of writing, so one of them is likely to be a stickler for your child). Then they have questions about the text, but the questions are not all the same.

A lot of the ACT questions will expect your student to know the "big picture" - what is the author trying to say? What is her main point and major reasons or examples? Can you infer from that what the author would say about this other thing that isn't in there? Those are the kinds of questions I like! These are things we've been doing all along with narration and notebooking.

But then the ACT has "detail" questions. And the thing I really tried to get across to my young tutoring student was NOT to try to memorize all those details as he read. When he did that, and I asked what he had read, he was throwing out all these random details that he was trying to keep in his brain, with no organization to them. So, I made him *first* understand what each paragraph was "about" - use only one or two words. That way, he could answer those "big picture" questions, but *also* he knew right where to go back and look to answer the detail questions.

Therefore, if our students *do* get the big picture in the SOTW chapters, then they should be able to know where to go back and locate the details for those outlines... maybe?

Not sure every kid would benefit from that method, but it made me think about "overview work" as separate from "detail work" -- maybe there is a benefit to learning to look at the overview, and then spending some time learning to look for details in a text? Sadly, my tendency is to love teaching the overview and hate worrying about the details :~ Somewhere in 2nd semester, we switched back to notebooking instead of some of the outlining. But I have had to admit that what we did probably is helping my ds with high school ;)

Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

weareborgswife
Posts: 14
Joined: Fri Mar 23, 2012 3:44 am

1850-MOd SOTW tests??

Unread post by weareborgswife » Tue Jul 15, 2014 11:48 pm

asheslawson wrote:Just out of curiosity, does anybody use SOTW tests with 1850-MOD? I know in past sets MFW does not use SOTW in exact order or cover every chapter, therefore I am not certain if I would be able to use the tests if I did try to. I don't want to spend the money on them if that is the case. But if possible, it might make keeping a grade in history a little easier and it would give me a way to see what they do remember. Thanks!!
I am planning to integrate them with Rome to the Reformation next year, as we own the books in audio format as well as in print, and I know some days I will need to use the audio format- and this way I can tell if they are staying tuned in (I stop and ask questions, discuss etc, as we read aloud usually)... my oldest has listened to the audio cds many times, so this will make it more interesting for him I hope.

My middle daughter has heard them a few times as well, so again, this helps them lock in more specifics (at least that is my plan!).

dhudson
Posts: 320
Joined: Thu May 10, 2007 5:46 pm

Re: 1850-MOd SOTW tests??

Unread post by dhudson » Fri Jul 18, 2014 4:19 pm

I bought them to use last year (EXP to 1850) and did a few but found that they weren't as useful as narrations.
God Bless,
Dawn
http://www.shiningexamples.blogspot.com
blessed Mom of three - 16, 13 & 13
happy user of MFW since 2002

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