Spelling - Helps, creative ideas for teaching in general

Copywork, Cursive, Dictation, Grammar, Handwriting, Letter Writing, Memory Work, Narration, Read-Alouds, Spelling, Vocabulary, & Writing (many of these topics apply to other subjects such as Bible, History, and Science)
kellybell
Posts: 478
Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 2:40 pm

Spelling - Helps, creative ideas for teaching in general

Unread post by kellybell » Mon Oct 03, 2005 7:54 am

Helping several children practice spelling words
Hi,
As for me, we do spelling in the kitchen while I stir up something for dinner or unload the dishwasher.

When my oldest was at school, they sent home a spelling list. To help her study, I'd read the words into a cassette and she'd study them alone in her room. She did fine on her tests. You could try doing that.

Or, perhaps the two older kids could work on their spelling together, reading to each other, correcting each other, etc.

Oh, and I'd recommend sticking with Primary and Intermediate Language Lessons if you are using them. Even though a lot of it is oral with mom, it takes a lot less time than the language programs some of my friends are using! It IS a challenge having a bunch of school kids that young.
Kelly, wife to Jim since 1988, mom to Jamie (a girl, 1994), Mary (1996), Brian (1998) and Stephanie (2001).

Tina
Posts: 119
Joined: Tue Aug 30, 2005 6:00 pm

Jumping for spelling test

Unread post by Tina » Sat Dec 10, 2005 8:19 pm

kellybell wrote:After both pages are filled out in his book, I read the words to him for a spelling test. I have him "jump the words" on a letter mat we found at Target (a Crayola spelling game mat). He likes this better than writing.
Dh and I are going to find it and make it a Christmas gift of ds. Thank you. I know that jumping his spelling list will work well for him. Thanks again!
Tina, homeschooling mother of Laura (1996), Jacob (1998) and Tucker (2003) In MO
"One of the greatest blessings of heaven is the appreciation of heaven on earth. He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain what he cannot lose."--JIM ELLIOT

kellybell
Posts: 478
Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 2:40 pm

Spelling Power creative ideas

Unread post by kellybell » Thu Mar 27, 2008 10:54 pm

Posted: Thu Sep 21, 2006 12:13 pm
The nice thing is that there are so many different ways to teach spelling that you can find something that works and most of the techniques aren't going to be tough on Mom.

One thing I recommended here or somewhere is to go to the internet and search on "third grade spelling list" (or whatever grade) and you'll get a bunch of lists from Mrs. Smith's class in Wisconsin and Mrs. Jones class in Maryland. Pick a list you like and just teach it, sitting down to discuss WHY something is spelled the way it is, even if the answer to why is "I don't know." Find ways to break the word down (Wed -- nes -- day).

Posted: Mon Sep 25, 2006 7:21 am
For now, why don't you jot down in a little memo book the words you notice she is misspelling consistently (thinking back, my middle girl spelled they "thay" for the longest time). Make you own spelling lists based on what she goofs up as well as examples from spelling rules she's learning (which are really phonics rules, aren't they?)

Just type in (in a huge font) five or eight or so words and print them out. Look them over together and discuss why things are spelled they way they are.

Then, have her tell you when she's ready for a spelling "test." At her age, it's not really a test but call it what you want. If she gets them all right, then it's time for a quarter, a candy, or whatever is a treat.

After a few weeks, go back to some of the original words to see if she remembered them.

In 3rd grade or so, start Spelling Power. No need to rush it.

MJP
Posts: 109
Joined: Sat Sep 11, 2004 9:25 pm

Re: Spelling Power creative ideas

Unread post by MJP » Thu Mar 27, 2008 10:56 pm

Posted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 10:28 pm
We use the page protectors and Expo markers for practicing missed words too. This makes it so much more fun.

We also use our "wax" tablet (non-drying clay) instead of tracing the word.

I also mark any words she misses and continue to test them throughout the year--sporadically, but always before the review tests. I erase the little checkmarks if the word becomes clearly easy for her.

Instead of using the Spelling Power workbooks or just a notebook (both of which we have tried) we bought a ream of spelling sheets this year. Everyone thinks they are fun.

We just continue to tweak the program. The more I have tweaked, the happier I have been with it. In the beginning the program seemed so regimented that I didn't think I could do anything different from the directions and still experience success. In the end, we experienced success when we tweaked it to meet our needs.

cbollin

Creative ways to spell?

Unread post by cbollin » Thu Mar 27, 2008 11:49 pm

Eve wrote:My eleven year old boy is constantly spelling with letters turned around. For instance, to spell leaf, he might spell it laef. We use Spelling Power, but the 10 step study doesn't always work for him. We are constantly going over and over past words. When we take the review tests, it is almost like we have to use that list for the week, testing again on those very same words!

We have to come up with creative ways to spell. For instance, with "because" I had him remember this statement: "Be Extra Careful Always Under Sam's Elephant." Or with "Their" we finally came up with "The Iguana's Run." LOL He knows that their means ownership and there means location, but get him to spell it?

Are there any other suggestions for helping him? (This is all hard for me to understand because I am a natural speller!)
Thanks, Eve
Posted: Sat Apr 14, 2007 6:33 pm
some ideas to help...

have him record himself saying the letters out loud in the correct order and let him listen to it.

Also, separate out the groups in SP a bit more. That helps too. Example: don't study all of the possible long e spellings on the same day.

Also -- consider a small tweak on SP. Now that you are breaking the list down into smaller sections (ee words on one day, ea on another) test each of those words, every day instead of just testing the ones he misses. My daughter needed to practice words that she knew to give her some confidence along the way. I know ---it's not the SP way of doing it, but it helped us a bit. it also helped if I had her write it on the dry erase board and circle the spelling rule (in other words, she'd circle the ea in each word) while saying all of them out loud. Since the lists were small enough, it wasn't a problem time wise.

One thing I've done that seems to help my girls, is to keep a list of "personal tough spelling words" and we just keep it on a wall in the school. Put it near the place where you do most of your writing. Nothing wrong with having a reference sheet for spelling. They can refer to the list to get the spelling in everyday writing.

Some times it is the rule that is missed on those review tests and sometimes it is just a specific word.

I don't know if any of that will help in your case or not.

--crystal

Lucy
Posts: 444
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suggestions, including siblings

Unread post by Lucy » Thu Mar 27, 2008 11:55 pm

Posted: Sun Aug 19, 2007 12:30 am
One of my kids has never been able to miss more than about 3 or 4 words before we needed to stop. It really did not matter to me where we were on the list or if the 5 mins. had passed. When you give a test it is 5 mins. or when they miss 4 or 5 words or whatever number you have chosen.

From experience I know that sometimes if we use a book too long, even the presence of the book has a negative effect on a kid. My daughter felt this way about the first reading book I used with her. So you may not be able to return to SP for a while. I do not say this to discourage you, but to let you know that this just happens. I think you will find as they begin to read and write more that some of the spelling will naturally be picked up. You may find that you could still use the study method with new words. I liked one poster's idea about still using the list as a weekly spelling list. This way you could still have them working at their level.

Also since they are twins I was wondering if you were giving them words at the same time? If so I would suggest doing this and any skill related subject such as math or English separately to reduce the competition aspect. This of course will not eliminate it but it will help. My kids are 2 years apart but at the same level in math (that is the only subject that they are the same in). The other child knows that she has strengths in other areas and so she has learned to live with this. My son is working on an attitude of humility :).

Praying you find the right solution for your family.
Lucy

Julie in MN
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Location: Minnesota

Discussing the spellings

Unread post by Julie in MN » Thu Mar 27, 2008 11:58 pm

Posted: Mon Oct 22, 2007 10:24 am
I am doing a little spelling with my 6th grader. We skipped several years of spelling because he's a good speller, but he's now reached the point where he needs to learn to spell some higher level vocabulary.

What I have been doing is just "discussing the spellings" with him. Look at the next word on the appropriate list & see if he knows what it means. Then discuss any spelling decisions (e.g. does it use the most common spelling for /er/ or one of the unusual ones as in girl or nurse), and see if we can identify why a particular spelling is used (e.g. tion is used in action and sion in tension, because the root words are act and tense), etc.

Then he writes it on the marker board. We're done unless I think he'll need more review in the future -- then I pencil a mark by the word in the book. It's been taking about 5 minutes a day to do 10 words.

Sometimes I use the Spelling Power lists, but right now we are working on a "spelling bee list" from our co-op. I figure any list will do!

TriciaMR
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Using MFW methods has helped big time

Unread post by TriciaMR » Sun May 18, 2008 12:23 am

Posted: Tue Feb 05, 2008 6:36 pm
Even though we're not doing ECC or SP yet, using MFW methods has helped big time.

She was struggling so much with spelling before - even though we were writing them and saying them every day. I researched Spelling Power (spelling is a very weak subject for dd). Our current spelling program has weekly spelling lists. So, on Friday, we just kind of go over the new list for the next week, talk about the special sounds and sight words, and I make 3x5 cards for all the words. For the vocabulary words I have her write the definition and draw a picture on the back of the 3x5 cards [an ECC technique].

Then, Monday I pretest her on the first 5 words, and use the Spelling power steps to review any she missed. (For the "writing in the air" step, I have her use her finger on one of our couch pillows that has a lot of texture on it.) Then on Tuesday we do the first 10 words, then Wednesday 15, and then 20 on Thursday. Plus we briefly review the vocabulary words each day. We've been doing this since the beginning of the year, and she has only missed ONE spelling word in 4 weeks. (I decided to test her orally on vocabulary words, instead of writing, since writing is hard for her, especially dictation.)

She is so much more confident in her spelling now. And, she is much more willing just to try to write something out. So again, even though we're not doing ECC yet, using MFW methods has helped big time.

I'm very excited for going "full time" this fall.

-Trish

Jenn in NC
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Re: Using MFW methods has helped big time

Unread post by Jenn in NC » Sun May 18, 2008 12:25 am

TriciaMR wrote:use the Spelling power steps to review any she missed.
Posted: Wed Feb 06, 2008 7:00 am
This very thing happened with us a few months ago! Nothing worked with spelling until I took my ds's current spelling program and taught it the Spelling Power way!

cbollin

Just a thought about spelling

Unread post by cbollin » Sun Jun 29, 2008 1:06 am

gressman9 wrote:I didn't like the lumping all the different ways to make a sound together on a list, etc.
Posted: Sat Mar 29, 2008 6:34 am
I felt the same way about that part of SP. So, I change the order of the list within each phonics group so that my kids study similar words within the phonics group then study another legit spelling of the sound. In other words I call out the words that are all ee for long E, then call out the ea words.

We even follow the suggestion in the mfw TM for those cheap spiral notebooks and fold the paper in half and all of that. I like the hints in the tm too. :)

-crystal

cbollin

SP with a perfectionist?

Unread post by cbollin » Mon Sep 29, 2008 11:55 pm

RB wrote:Where did you find tips for doing SP with a perfectionist?
Posted: Tue May 27, 2008 2:26 pm
maybe the Paula H archives article on that would help????
www dot redshift.com/~bonajo/SPhow.htm#perf

*********
you don't have to do the "pre test" step in a written form. You can do a practice time and let them tell you if they don't know the word so it can be studied. Then they study test study. We do this a lot ;)

-crystal

cbollin

Stumped On Spelling

Unread post by cbollin » Fri May 21, 2010 8:10 pm

Lainie wrote:My 3rd grade ds... does not have a speech lang. delay or hearing problems. He does have ocular motor dysfunction but has really come a long way with therapy. We didn't focus very hard on lang. arts last year so he is still "catching up."

With that as my foundation, here is where I am stumped. There seems to be similar words that don't "stick" in his brain. The current ones are: twelve and Thursday. He will spell twelve as "twlvew" and Thursday will be either "Thrsday" or Thrusday." He is nine and tends to want to spell with just the consonants.

We do the SP Activity Cards. Other words come more easily. But, it seems that words with "t" or "k" really throw him for a loop.
It may be on the slower side of normal and may be ok.

I don't know if you saw where my oldest chimed in on a thread today, but we weren't joking that "mom geve up on speling fer me".... Her brain works too fast sometimes. But I've seen lots of improvement as she types more and has to pick the right spelling from spell check. It's not a quick fix. And some words still give her fits.
Lainie wrote:Questions:
(1) What do you do if your child is really stumped by a word and you've reviewed the rule, had them write it many times, done an activity or two ( or three)? (My thought is, it will come eventually and not worry about random words here or there, but I'm a bit "relaxed" in our homeschool approach.)
I would....
Build a Word Bank dictionary for him to look it up and copy it when he uses that word, or to go back and check on it. some of that idea is part of the "teaching younger students" section of SP on the Friday section. p. 90 in 4th edition. talks about it in terms of notecards instead of a 3 ring binder. (p. 93 in 3rd ed I think?)

perhaps look into the sections of SP on teaching proofreading skills and being one's own editor? it will contain some notes on how to look up problem words without too much interruption on the writing process. (3rd edition. p. 52-57 ish) 4th edition..... p. 252

also, check p. 92 of 4th edition SP (I don't know the corresponding pages in 3rd, but it is called Spelling and Learning Disabilities". wait aminute... p. 71 in 3rd)
it should have some very encouraging paragraphs about those trans-positional reversals and give some guidelines for evaluating for further helps.

also, can he "segment" words very easily and slow down saying the words out loud even when they are one syllable words?
tw
e
l
ve (and the e is there because English words may not end with the letter V)

what about going with scrap paper nearby or dry erase board to try tough words first?

and once you have the words segmented, remember syllables too.
One idea in one popular spelling program out there is to have the child line up coins (or other marker) on the table
and physically pull down a coin per sound while saying the word to really hear the sounds before spelling the word.

or to use color coded tiles. You know how in SP there is the copy page (either in the book or on CD rom, I forget which) for letter tiles? why not color code the vowels and use letter tiles for one of the activities? Assuming no color blindness issues, he might do well to practice where the vowels are in the words he is studying when doing the 10 step study guide. On what is it... step 2 where you "look and study" the word to catch the weasel....
well, that would be a good time to try it with color coded tiles.
(2) What is "normal" for spelling in the third grade?
who knows?
Each of my children are soooooo very different and I don't know if I s/b concerned. There is no middle ground in our house so I have NO IDEA what "okay" looks like.
I understand. ((Hugs)))

did you call the mfw office yet and ask someone to have David get back to you? I know he and Marie have a wide variety of spellers in their crew. Nothing wrong with picking our cyber brains, but thought I'd remind you of that option to call on some of this. :)
At the time we started w/ Spelling Power my 5th grader's placement evaluation was Level K so we don't even do spelling with her anymore (7th grade). Our now 5th grader is about to enter Level H so she should finish the program b/4 high school is over.
But I'm stumped by our "little" who can't seem to pass Level A (but we're moving on to Level B anyway!) And a rate of one level per year, he won't get to Level K unless something "clicks" -- which I am hoping something does.

Oh dear, sorry to ramble. Help? Anyone?
(((hugs))) I'm glad you're moving to level B with your son. Some of the toughest words in each level get reviewed and practiced in the next level. I think twelve and Thursday are among them.

-crystal

Postby cbollin » Fri May 21, 2010 9:40 pm
Lainie wrote:... how do you know that much about the manual??!!
Woman, you got mad skillz!
We will change the approach but stick with the program for now and do the "Study-Test-Study."
You're welcome. uh... 5.5 years of tweaking and trying and finding that the book has a lot of hidden helps in it. (table of contents?) :-)

but yeah, give some tweaks on the study test study method and see how it goes.
then there are some people who use SP along with something online to make worksheets called spellingcity. I have no clue about that.

one other tip:
when you get to long vowel list, some children do better to group the list into smaller list so that all of the ea words are in one week, and the ee words in another.

-crystal

Julie in MN
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Re: Stumped On Spelling

Unread post by Julie in MN » Fri May 21, 2010 9:54 pm

Hi lainie,
I think l and r are confusing to some kids because sometimes the sound is spelled in different ways, such as le (as in little) or ll (as in well) or el (as in shovel) or even al (as in sandal) and you might include il (as in pencil). When I tutor, I try to encourage kids that they made a logical guess. I mean, "twlvew" might be a kid thinking... twu-l-ve-and don't I need another letter in there?!

Then I ask what the other ways to spell /el/ are (if they aren't going to know, I might instead say, "Good guess but for this word, use the /l/ that's in "camel.").

And at home, I might print the two culprit words in big letters and tape them to his writing surface :)

Or come to think of it, he maybe mixing up the sounds in the "name" of the letter (L is said as el) vs. the "sound" of the letter ( just /l/), or adding a little sound after the W so it sounds more like /wu/. But either way, I think he's making some fairly logical tries ;)

Julie
Last edited by Julie in MN on Fri May 21, 2010 11:28 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

TriciaMR
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Re: Stumped On Spelling

Unread post by TriciaMR » Fri May 21, 2010 10:21 pm

Lainie,

I think my dd is very auditory (not so much visual), so she just doesn't "see" when words are spelled wrong. (My dh teases and will say, "What?!? I she homeschooled or something?") We've been using All About Spelling, and there has finally (end of 4th grade now) been some gradual improvement. I think a new spelling curriculum that combines Spelling Power and All About Spelling to make the "perfect" spelling curriculum ;)

The other thing I've read is to have kids make their own spelling notebooks. On each page you have a rule, and you help your child analyze the words they are misspelling and then have them write it under the rule they violated, and then they use that to study spelling words. So, if they missed the "Every syllable must have a vowel" rule, then you put the word on that page. If they missed the /er/ sound can be spelled er, ir, ur, ear, or or (like Thursday, being spelled Thrusday), then you put it on that page.

I think, though, your son is young, yet. I think definitely switching to a study-test-study method with SP is beneficial through level A and B. I did that with my dd for a while.

Dianne Craft stuff would be good, if it were more fun. I will say that dd can now cross the midline no problem (like cross crawls and such - she was doing it yesterday while reciting the Isaiah passage for me for her "final" memorization test in CTG).

Worship dance probably helps with that, too.

A good idea to have dd do some kind of movement, exercise, etc, where she crosses the mid-line before writing and spelling. It all works together!

-Trish
Trish - Wife to Phil, Mom to Toni(18), Charlie(14), and Trent(14)
2014-2015 - AHL, CTG
2015-2016 - WHL, RTR
2016-2017 - EXP1850, US1877
2017-2018 - DE, 1850MOD
2018-2019 - College, AHL
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RachelT
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Re: Stumped On Spelling

Unread post by RachelT » Sat May 22, 2010 7:23 am

Hi Lainie!

I would be focusing on phonemic awareness if your child is skipping vowel sounds. I am looking at spelling programs for my younger child for next year and have been comparing SbSS, SP, and AAS. It just sounds to me like your younger child might do better with a more phonemic approach to spelling than a traditional method.
Rachel, wife to Doug ~ 1995, mom to J (17) and B (15)
MFW K (twice), 1st (twice), Adv., ECC, & CtG 2006-2010,
Classical Conversations 2010-2016,
ECC/AHL 2016-17, eclectic 2017-18, WHL & US1 2018-19

http://rachelsreflections-rachelt.blogspot.com/

cbollin

Re: Stumped On Spelling

Unread post by cbollin » Sat May 22, 2010 11:40 am

Lainie wrote:Rachel, thank you for taking the time to post such a thoughtful reply! Everyone has given me lots to think/pray on.
He definitely remembers words once they have been incorporated into a picture or a song better.

Crystal, I did not miss your point... exercise before and in between seatwork. Got it!
definitely agreeing with Rachel that some students benefit from lists being re-arrangement or involving "right brain strategies" with pics and songs.... so maybe the 5 minute activity time in SP could be a song and dance routine.... while skating.

now....I wonder....you're in RTR..
pull out The Human Body for Every Kid...
go back to some of the basics in the
chapter called Brainpower
chapter called balancing act.
anything in there for some quick sitting exercises 15 minutes before seatwork?

-crystal
Last edited by cbollin on Sat May 22, 2010 11:47 am, edited 3 times in total.

doubleportion
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Re: Stumped On Spelling

Unread post by doubleportion » Sat May 22, 2010 6:48 pm

Lainie wrote:He will spell twelve as "twlvew" and Thursday will be either "Thrsday" or Thrusday." He is nine and tends to want to spell with just the consonants.
I remember by dd having trouble with twelve and twenty for a long time. Then one day it just clicked. I do know boys tend to do things on a different curve than girls. So that makes it hard to compare. My middle ds has done certain things way slower and other things way faster than his older sister.

Edie

TriciaMR
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Joined: Thu Sep 20, 2007 11:43 am

Spelling

Unread post by TriciaMR » Sat Jun 05, 2010 9:14 am

saralynn wrote:I have a question about spelling curriculum. I have a bright 12 year old who simply can't spell. We have tried a variety of spelling programs (including Spelling Power), but nothing seems to really work. He is very frustrated at the fact that he can't spell even the simplest words.
After he learns to spell words he later forgets it. "When" is spelled w-i-n and "where" is w-e-r. His reading is at grade level. The funny thing is he seems to be very visual.

What have others done in this situation? is there a spelling curriculum that anyone has has success with. Many Thanks,
Sara
Sara,

My dd struggles with spelling, too. I'd recommend All About Spelling, but as your son is older, he might be insulted by the review of phonics. My dd was only 8 when we started AAS, and she really didn't like having to review the phonics sounds. But, that part is essential. We tried Sequential Spelling, but I didn't see it carry over to her regular writing. But, as your son is older, it might be a better fit (longer words are introduced earlier).

The other thing is, once my dd spells a word one way (like, "wen" for "when"), it takes forever to undo that. So, I have her spell with tiles, writing with her finger in sand, writing it correctly on her paper a couple of times, and in a sentence. So, we really work on it.

I'm not sure if my dd is auditory or visual. She'll spell words right out loud, but when she goes to write them... ugh. But, after using AAS, she is now starting to recognize when a word is spelled wrong. She can't always remember the right way, but she is now recognizing more when it is wrong.
-Trish
Trish - Wife to Phil, Mom to Toni(18), Charlie(14), and Trent(14)
2014-2015 - AHL, CTG
2015-2016 - WHL, RTR
2016-2017 - EXP1850, US1877
2017-2018 - DE, 1850MOD
2018-2019 - College, AHL
My blog

Julie in MN
Posts: 2928
Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 3:44 pm
Location: Minnesota

Re: Spelling

Unread post by Julie in MN » Sat Jun 05, 2010 9:54 am

saralynn wrote: "When" is spelled w-i-n and "where" is w-e-r.
Sara,
I don't know that much about other spelling programs, but I would take every opportunity to encourage him that he's making logical choices, and then to point out patterns. It's hard to tell from just two examples, but it seems like he understands basic phonics (except short i and short e, but they are sometimes hard to distinguish). The next stage is sorting words into spelling patterns. In your example, you might point out that all the question words seem to start with WH rather than the usual W.

Some kids just seem to get overwhelmed with all the spellings and feel it's all random, without seeing that there are groups of words with the same spelling patterns, I know Spelling Power showed some of the patterns, but I just mean telling your child that he's halfway there and is sounding things out, but he's probably noticed that there are several ways to spell some sounds and it's not going to be an endless task to figure out -- they tend to come in groups.

Just a thought,
Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

saralynn
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Re: Spelling

Unread post by saralynn » Sat Jun 05, 2010 11:11 am

Here are some examples of his spelling. One thing is that he is more likely to spell a word right during a spelling test than he is writing stories. I have him do a lot of his summaries and reports oral, because he is learning the words wrong when he writes.
misses = messes
with = whith
blaster = baster
victory =vitorve
triumph = triumt
what = wut or whut
pirate = pirets
went = whent or wint
wealth = welth
I guess I am looking for the least painful way for him to continue to study spelling. He does well with Sequential Spelling until we take a few days off and then he seems to have forgotten what he has learned. If he is trying to spell a word he will put in all of the different way a sound can be spelled until he finds the right one. If he has a rule sheet he can often figure out the right spelling. Some of the rules he knows and others he doesn't. We will sit for 10 minutes until he tries all of the different ways to spell a word and then falls apart when he misses one. He can spell a word right for a long time and then suddenly start spelling it wrong again. Very frustrating.

Does it ever just click? I guess I am hoping for that.

tiffany
Posts: 162
Joined: Thu Mar 10, 2005 9:56 am

Re: Spelling

Unread post by tiffany » Sat Jun 05, 2010 2:24 pm

I've just been looking for a spelling program for my 12 year old also. We settled on espindle. It is an online program. They do offer a free 10 day trial. After that it costs $10 monthly for one student, with discounts for additional family members. We will be trying it out over the summer. We decided to go with espindle because the child works independently.

I think spelling and composition have kind of taken a backseat at our house. For this particular child, who also can't stand to write, I think additional writing assignments along with a spelling program we are actually using will be a major key to improving his spelling. We'll see if I'm on the right track in the next few months, and then we'll reevaluate. My oldest is also not a natural speller, but she worked out most of the kinks by 8th grade. Still struggles a bit, but much better. I might put her on espindle too, just for review.
Tiffany
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Have completed MFWK, MFW 1st grade, ECC, CTG, RTR, Exp.-1850,1850-Mod., HS Ancients, HS World
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mgardenh
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Re: Spelling

Unread post by mgardenh » Sun Jun 06, 2010 7:45 am

I read the words out loud and most of the sound correct when you say them out loud except for blaster and victory.

Being one who is a terrible speller, I used to spell most of those words the same way until I memorized how to spell them and used them several times.

Just curious have you thought about having him tested for dyslexia or some other issue? Ok I have never been tested but I've been told by several dyslexics that I am. There may be some sort of visual thing going on that he "sees" them the correct way. Just thought I bring up the possibility (that was hard to spell took me 2 minutes to figure out the right way using spell check).

Just thought I'd ask. Ignore it if you don't think it applies to your situation.
Mike
DH to Laurel
SAHD (mostly) to
Julia - 10 years old, Explorations to 1850
Alexis-7 years old, Explorations to1850 see her story at
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Have used MFW, k, 1st, Adventures, and ECC, CTG, RtR

Julie in MN
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Location: Minnesota

Re: Spelling

Unread post by Julie in MN » Sun Jun 06, 2010 9:35 am

saralynn wrote:misses = messes
with = whith
blaster = baster
victory =vitorve
triumph = triumt
what = wut or whut
pirate = pirets
went = whent or wint
wealth = welth
I'm agreeing with Mike -- blaster & victory are the only two I don't see spelled phonetically. Maybe he just felt overwhelmed & made random guesses in the end on those?

Maybe you'll find the perfect program out there. I'm just throwing out some random ideas in case you don't.

The Writing Strands guy has a suggestion about teaching vocab by having a word per week (52 per year) and really immersing in that word. I wonder if you could do the same thing with a spelling pattern -- really get into it. Have ds post one rule around the house, discuss the interesting thing about that rule at the dinner table, listing words spelled that way, etc. I know it would take extra work, but it sounds like he's motivated to work on this challenge for him.

One side benefit would be my personal passion -- getting poor spellers to realize there are only a certain number of patterns they need to remember -- it's not never-ending or impossible.

I still see the two problems in your original two words showing up a lot - maybe you could start with those:

- the "wh" spelling of /w/, which is especially used in question words, and those are the words he would use the most; you could add to that list of WH words by talking, discussing, brainstorming, or the old standby the dictionary (e.g. wheel, white, whip)

- hearing the difference between a short "e" and a short "i," which is surprisingly difficult, and depending on where you live it may be nearly impossible (people in Denver definitely say /Dinver/), so you could do a lot of conversation about that, guessing games, etc., focusing on really *hearing* the vowel sound even in words he knows how to spell. Another thing that helped with a man from India whom I tutored was to drag out the vowel sounds in those words a little longer, so he could hear it more clearly (saying to himself "weeeent").
saralynn wrote:If he has a rule sheet he can often figure out the right spelling.
I'd be fine with letting him tape a rule sheet to the table where he does his work. Some folks will never be good spellers, and teaching them methods they could use to compensate will take them far. Lists and reference books with page markers in them are possible tools that he could have at his desk when he has a job some day. And you may even be able to slowly take some things off of his desk with practice.

I worked in medical transcription for 20 years and was very good at it, but the number of spellings required went way beyond my memorization capacity (medications, surgery instruments, names of diseases, hundreds of names of doctors...). My coworkers and bosses were often confused when I couldn't come up with correct spellings orally, while my work was correct. I am very visual as your son seems to be. My reference books had more use than any of the others', and I was just as fast at looking something up as they might be at searching their memory banks :) And after a while, some of the words you look up a lot do, indeed, become committed to memory. Others became my "personal challenge words" that were on my "short list" right next to my keyboard ;)

Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
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TriciaMR
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Re: Spelling

Unread post by TriciaMR » Sun Jun 06, 2010 1:07 pm

One of the things in All About Spelling is "pronounce for spelling." So, you say it the way you say it in conversation, and then you say it so you can spell it. My dd has had a word that she has been working on for several weeks - "direction," which she spells "drection." So, to help her remember, the way we pronounce for spelling is /di/ (long i) /rection/. Now, it takes several times before she will remember the pronounce for spelling way of saying it, but it does help, and eventually becomes automatic. So, the first time we say the word, we say it normally, then say "pronounce for spelling" and say it the other way. Then, I ask her to say it to make sure she is pronouncing correctly. (Another example - "together" - she will say "to get her" to remember how to spell it. For some reason, she has trouble remembering to write th for /th/ sounds.)

-Trish
Trish - Wife to Phil, Mom to Toni(18), Charlie(14), and Trent(14)
2014-2015 - AHL, CTG
2015-2016 - WHL, RTR
2016-2017 - EXP1850, US1877
2017-2018 - DE, 1850MOD
2018-2019 - College, AHL
My blog

RachelT
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Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 2:45 pm

Re: Spelling

Unread post by RachelT » Mon Jun 07, 2010 11:07 pm

Hi there! I had some thoughts like Mike because my own son is dyslexic and dysgraphic. Spelling is a lot more difficult for him than reading. AAS looks like a good program and I've heard that Sequential Spelling has helped some of my friends. We have been using the Barton Reading and Spelling System for about a year and it is working! AAs and Barton are both based on Orton Gillingham methods that really work for these kinds of learners. Barton is also designed to be used for any age group, even adults or older students and I don't think it would seem too "young" for him at all. My son is visual, too, like you said you believe your son is. Dyslexia is more than a vision problem and there is a lot of information about it on the Barton website. (http://www.bartonreading.com). My son is actually very bright, like a lot of dyslexics, and he can verbally express himself and his ideas without any problems, but his brain doesn't make the connections easily for him to read, spell, or write. We have done most of PLL orally and could not do any dictations at all until this year, but with the Barton program he is finally dictating words, phrases and sentences that are limited to what he has learned in this sequential program, up to that point. It makes sense and uses color coded letter tiles and multi-sensory techniques.

I don't want to scare you or upset you! I don't know your son, but his spelling patterns look like he clearly does not have a solid ability to translate the sounds that he hears into letter combinations - encoding. Spelling by Sound and Structure led my son to tears! I have looked at Spelling Power and although it shows patterns, it would be not work for my son. It might for my dd, but I am so "trained" now with the Barton that I think I need to use that or AAS with her.

Just some more things to think about! :)
Rachel, wife to Doug ~ 1995, mom to J (17) and B (15)
MFW K (twice), 1st (twice), Adv., ECC, & CtG 2006-2010,
Classical Conversations 2010-2016,
ECC/AHL 2016-17, eclectic 2017-18, WHL & US1 2018-19

http://rachelsreflections-rachelt.blogspot.com/

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