Language Arts - Lesson Plans and Scope

Copywork, Cursive, Dictation, Grammar, Handwriting, Letter Writing, Memory Work, Narration, Read-Alouds, Spelling, Vocabulary, & Writing (many of these topics apply to other subjects such as Bible, History, and Science)
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Julie in MN
Posts: 2928
Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 3:44 pm
Location: Minnesota

Language Arts - Lesson Plans and Scope

Unread post by Julie in MN » Wed Feb 22, 2006 12:25 am

Lesson Plans?
kim in ks wrote:Is there a daily lesson plan for the language arts? For example, dictation-writing assignments-copywork? I understand Spelling power, I've used it for the last 10 years. But is there anything planned for correlating writing work?

I will be using 3rd or 4th grade level of LA ! But are there Daily Lesson plans for any of the levels? and if so, which ones.
thanks
kim
Kim,
If you look at the samples of ECC & CTG, you will see much of your Language Arts mapped out for you. Go down to the weekly grid. You will find many things included in the lesson plans for your week:

Included in the MFW Guides:
* Independent writing (& editing) in your geography or history notebook, and possibly science notebooking
* Letter writing
* Memory work
* Handwriting
* Copywork & Dictation (learning from the masters)
* Vocabulary Word(s) for the week, as well as review methods (ECC, CTG, RTR)
* Independent reading time (book lists included)
* Read-alouds (books included in Deluxe package)
* Book basket time (book lists included)
* CTG has dictionary work
* CTG & RTR have vocab sentence-writing practice
* EX1850 has report-writing, as does ECC in 7-8th

Then for the remaining portions of Language Arts, specific tools are recommended and specifics about using them are given, but they are not so tightly interwoven that you cannot substitute your own program easily:

* Writing (Writing Strands -- actual lesson numbers in ECC, or other) - adding skills like tense & 1st person
* Spelling (Spelling Power, with specific start-up pages given, or other)
* English (PLL/ILL, with specific pages given for each grade, or other) - adding skills like apostrophes, gentle grammar such as was/were, & a bit of poetry


I think MFW breaks down "Language Arts" into very specific skills and looks for the best tool to develop that skill. There is a lot of room for students who may be ahead in one portion and need more reinforcement in another. The other advantage of using separate components is that language arts can be tailored to your child's needs. For instance, my son is a great speller and has terrible handwriting, but one of your kids may be the exact opposite. "Language Arts" is so very broad that I for one am glad that MFW outlines my week so that all these components can be planned for!

Julie
[updated 2010]
Last edited by Julie in MN on Sat May 06, 2006 9:24 am, edited 2 times in total.
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

kim in ks
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Feb 21, 2006 7:37 pm

Some of my reasons, for wanting it all planned out!

Unread post by kim in ks » Wed Feb 22, 2006 10:01 am

Thanks so much.

I've seen where WRiting Strands was written in the grid, but no pg#'s or Lesson #'s. Is this where you just start the first lesson in Writing Strands when assigned, preceding the next lesson when assigned on the grid?

Sorry to be so detailed, I'm really at wits end w/ my daughter! I want something planned out exactly for her, so she can learn to work more indepently in some areas. I've been writing our own unit studies for the past year, but for next year, I want something I don't have to write out the lesson plans for. I figured this way I would have some idea, if she was a "lagger" or if I have just been planning too much. I'm a very disciplined mom, not very flexible, but I've really "went to town" on this one, changing my lessons to accomodate! And still we have very very long days!!!!!!!!!!!! I've been homeschooling for 15 years, and this has been my most frustrating child to homeschool. Yes we've tried the timer, rewarding, punishing, etc. I can't think ofanything we've not tried, to speed her up.

She is a good reader, so I don't know what the problem is. Thanks for listening/reading!
kim
Kim Boyenger

Guest

Unread post by Guest » Wed Feb 22, 2006 10:48 am

Here are my thoughts...
The Adventures and ECC TM's give some detail on using PLL. They say if 3rd grade+, you can begin WS3 at 2 lessons per week. In the ECC TM it gives exact WS3 lesson numbers, as I think that is where it is estimated you will begin that work. I think it boils down to 2 lessons on two days per week though. The other days are either PLL or ILL work, depending on level. So, I think the assumption is you will begin at WS3, and do 2 lessons per week...

Also, you might want to re-read the "Help! How do I fit everything in?" from the Hazell's in the Intro to the Teacher's manuals. It is interesting to see how they get their own motivated and moving in a timely manner. Plus, I smile every time I read it! Partly because it makes me realize almost ALL of us must be struggling / asking this same question. It is just nice to know I am not alone.

Which package are you using?
Do you belong to a coop? There are two sides to these... One is it is nice to visit and compare with other HS moms. The other is, don't take the comparisons too seriously. :)
HTH,

cbollin

Unread post by cbollin » Wed Feb 22, 2006 10:51 am

Kim,
{{{HUGS}}} for you!!!!!!!!! I think you and your daughter will find the checklist format helpful. Just a guess really --- I like it and my dd (4th grade) can use it. Something nice about seeing it all laid out and checking it off every day.

Because different students will be in different levels of LA and math (while all students using the same base curriculum) space is provided in the lesson plans for you to record the lesson numbers you teach.

These sections are left blank in the grid so that families using the program can adjust for multiple children. It is also left blank for families who are using L.A. materials that are different from the author's suggestions.

In my family, I can hand over the weekly grid to my oldest and say -- just look at what I have written down in the English and Spelling and Math sections.

In Writing Strands, you should be able to cover the material in the book if you teach 2 days of WS per week according to the TM for Creation to Greeks. This suggested pace in MFW is slightly different than that described in the Writing Strands book.

For Primary & Intermediate Language Lessons, in the TM for CTG you will find these kinds of guidelines for which lessons to complete: Grade 3: Lessons 83-164 of Primary Language Lessons. Grade 4: Lessons 1-100 in Intermediate Lang. Lessons.

You will need to write down in the space in the grid which lessons to do during the week. This shouldn't take a lot of your time. There have been plenty of times where I have written in the week's expectations on Monday morning and been done writing it in within a minute or two. The same thing for Math lessons. It takes minimal effort and time to write the plans down (thankfully.)

another set of {{hugs}}
crystal

kim in ks
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Feb 21, 2006 7:37 pm

WHoops! I'm looking at Creation to Greeks!

Unread post by kim in ks » Wed Feb 22, 2006 12:47 pm

You'll never know how much everyones input is helping me!

My daughter is 9 and is currently doing 3rd grade work, so I'm looking for a relaxed 4th grade curriculum, which she can succeed in, instead of being so frustrated all the time. We have already done geography, so that's why I was looking at Creation to Greeks. We also are needing more "integrated" Bible!

Thanks so much for everyone taking the time out of their very busy homeshcool mornings, to help answer my questions
kim
Kim Boyenger

Tina
Posts: 119
Joined: Tue Aug 30, 2005 6:00 pm

Unread post by Tina » Wed Feb 22, 2006 3:19 pm

Kim: along with what others have shared, I wanted to make a comment too that Intermediate Language Lessons (Iwhich is what you would use for LA, if you use what the Hazell's recommend with Creation to Greeks) is very gentle in its teaching and fairly easy for you as the teacher. I am using it now for my 4th grader.

I also wanted to clarify that it is not a workbook approach. It is a fairly small book with all different types of language lessons in it and very gentle grammar. I really like it. When you use it along with the other materials recommended by the Hazell's (as Julie pointed out in her post) you have a very well rounded LA program.
Tina, homeschooling mother of Laura (1996), Jacob (1998) and Tucker (2003) In MO
"One of the greatest blessings of heaven is the appreciation of heaven on earth. He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain what he cannot lose."--JIM ELLIOT

Julie in MN
Posts: 2928
Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 3:44 pm
Location: Minnesota

Language Arts - What activities are included?

Unread post by Julie in MN » Sat May 06, 2006 9:56 am

sheilanne wrote:Can anyone tell me what type of language arts activities are included in ECC for a 5th grader, and a 2/3rd grader? I'm hoping it will influence my decisions for next year.
Sheila,
I really think MFW should reconsider their statement that "you must add Language Arts." It should be, "you must add bits of Language Arts" LOL! And if you use all their recommendations, you don't have to add anything else. They not only suggest specific resources, but they also tell you what lessons are for which grades, how many lessons per week (2-3), and they provide a place in the grid to write these down (but they don't write them, because they vary by age, plus some folks use other things).

I think it's important to realize that if you add your own materials, you are only adding bits of instruction. MFW is very careful to make sure you cover every aspect of LA! Here is my summary of the Language Arts that MFW "integrates" and the few extras that MFW is careful to recommend that you add to each program.

Included in the MFW Guides:
* Independent writing (& editing) in your geography or history notebook, and possibly science notebooking
* Letter writing
* Memory work
* Handwriting
* Copywork & Dictation (learning from the masters)
* Vocabulary Word(s) for the week, as well as review methods (ECC, CTG, RTR)
* Independent reading time (book lists included)
* Read-alouds (books included in Deluxe package)
* Book basket time (book lists included)
* CTG has dictionary work
* CTG & RTR have vocab sentence-writing practice
* EX1850 has report-writing, as does ECC in 7-8th

Add:
* Specific writing skills like tense & 1st person (Writing Strands)
* Grammar skills - starting gently like apostrophes, was/were -- & a bit of poetry (PLL/ILL)
* Spelling at your student's level (SP)

[updated in 2010]
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

cbollin

Does MFW teach writing for multiple ages?

Unread post by cbollin » Wed Dec 06, 2006 6:01 am

TommyGirl wrote:We are in week 12 of Adventures and MFW1 and we are absolutely LOVING it!! I could not be more pleased with this curriculum and thank God daily for leading us here. I have some questions now as I think towards the future.

Do you feel that you get enough writing practice in all of the different genres and do you think you have enough guidance to help you in making assignments and grading them? Are there specific instructions given as you go through the year to the younger, middle, and older children? (This would be for the 2nd-8th grade programs.) So, do you have to decide what is appropriate for the different age levels that are studying together and come up with your own things?
Posted: Tue Nov 07, 2006 2:41 pm
In the early stages of writing, MFW encourages copywork, dictation and narrations as a foundation for writing skills.

Writing practice comes in several forms in the upper programs

* lots of notebook summary pages for "research" writing
* more formal writing is included in books that are part of the language arts curriculum (Primary language lessons, Intermediate Language Lessons, and Writing Strands). If you feel you need additional helps with how to evaluate writing, check out the book Evaluating Writing that Writing Strands offers. At this age, I'm not big into letter grades for writing.

In the 1st grade TM, take a look at pages 193-194 to get an idea of how MFW handles creative writing in the first grade. Remember, this is after many weeks of writing summaries in the Bible notebook, and copywork too.

By the time you are in EX1850, you are doing all kinds of writing across many subjects and you even have a 4-6 week unit of Writing a full research report (State History).
So, do you have to decide what is appropriate for the different age levels that are studying together and come up with your own things?
In the introduction to the TM in ECC and up, it is explained in a bit more detail than what you would see on the online sample. I look for when it says "advanced students do these pages," "omit for younger students."

--crystal

cbollin

Any insight on language arts?

Unread post by cbollin » Wed Jun 20, 2007 3:38 pm

dslicom wrote:I really like the idea of an integrated language arts program, but I also like the simplicity of MFW teacher's manual and hands on activities.

Any insight on the language arts from those who are using ECC and up would be appreciated.
Posted: Mon Mar 19, 2007 6:43 pm
I'm in EX1850 and we do a lot of writing that is integrated to the history and science that we read. MFW calls it "notebooking." It is scheduled in as part of the assignments and is related to what you have read in the spines.

There is also some writing that is separate from the unit studies. These more "creative" writing assignments come from English (Primary and Intermediate Language Lessons) and Writing Strands. That way you get a variety of writing practice over the week. Although, truth be told, usually in PLL/ILL we don't always do all of the composition as written work. I like to let my kids have oral composition for some assignments. That way it blends over with public speaking skills --- which my kids need practice on. :)
dslicom wrote: Have you found that you were able to "test" comprehension of your dc reading without discussion questions?
Sandi
Some of the books we use in MFW do come with their own questions inside them. We use those questions in those books.

For the ones that don't have questions, here is how we have been able to "test" comprehension without a discussion guide.
* We break up the readings a little bit and make comments along the way when WE as teachers notice something.
* We simply have our daughters tell us about the reading and listen to see if they are connecting the dots (narration along the way).
* We ask the basic WH questions (who, what, where, when, why, how come, and what do you think).
* Then they write some of it down.

This morning's reading from SOTW is a great example. I'm reading along, oldest is listening about Napeleon advancing into Russia. Winter comes. He heads back to France and almost everyone dies along the way from starvation and cold. This one sentence jumped out at me: Napeleon burned everything on his way to Russia. So, I asked my daughter (before finishing the reading) --- how did that affect his return trip?

It did break up the reading a bit, but that's ok. I think a big key to the reading comprehension is that I don't try to rush through the reading, and we talk along the way.

Another little thing we do is to help act out the stories for our younger child. It is not in the TM, but she still is young and we are working more on basic comprehension of reading with things like "sequencing" and basic questions. So, our dolls and teddy bears get to help with school a lot. That's when we know if she has understood history readings. Can she retell the story in her own words and get most of the story right. She's only 8 --

One of the other things that my dh pointed out is that an advantage to MFW is that it uses some "narrative style textbooks" instead of just living books. That way you aren't trying to pull information from several smaller sources within living books. Rather you use those living books to help with the text. He seems to think that style of reading/teaching doesn't require as much of a discussion guide. I dunno?

A little note about the "book list" that you are referring to. Those aren't meant to be "quiz your kid on these books" style of reading. Those book basket books are for the child to read and enjoy.

too much info
--crystal

HSmommi2mine
Posts: 159
Joined: Mon Oct 23, 2006 5:59 pm

Re: Any insight on language arts?

Unread post by HSmommi2mine » Wed Jun 20, 2007 4:00 pm

Posted: Mon Mar 19, 2007 8:13 pm
Ask a few basic questions. My sister hs's my dn and after reading a story my sis asks some form of these questions.

- Who were the characters in the story?
- What was the setting?
- What problem was solved?
- What did you like best about this story?
- and sometimes things like, how would you change the ending if you were the writer? or something else book specific. Just basic discussion may suit your needs.
- You could also do the "what happened first, next, next, last...?" kind of thing to get a narration going.
~Christina

Wife to my favorite guy
Mom to 3 great kids

MJP
Posts: 109
Joined: Sat Sep 11, 2004 9:25 pm

Re: Any insight on language arts?

Unread post by MJP » Wed Jun 20, 2007 4:28 pm

Posted: Mon Mar 19, 2007 9:51 pm
We have learned more and enjoyed school more with MFW than the program that had questions which we used for 2 years.

The lack of discussion questions has not bothered me as we do the spine reading together and I ask questions as we go along and when we finish. I also assign books. I read these books anyway so I just ask my kids questions about them. I also have them write some reports.

Previously, even though there were discussion questions, I still felt like I had to read the books myself to really be able to discuss the book with my children. So for us the lack of questions did not change our schooling at all.

There are certain books that do have some questions listed. Someone help me here. Didn't the Children's Homer in CtoG have questions listed?

I have also really been excited about the paragraphs my children have written for their notebooks. The notebooks are precious keepsakes, and it has been much easier with MFW because they are scheduled, there are aids in the teacher's manual, and sometimes there are internet links to pictures. Can you tell I am pleased with our notebooks? When I found MFW I quit looking so I can't comment on the other product you mentioned. Prayer, of course, is always needed when choosing curriculum. Best wishes.
Melissa
Wife of 1 for 18 yrs. Mom of 7--ages 1-15--1st, 2nd, 5th, 8th and 9th grades & (one on the way)
Psalm 16:8
Currently using--1850 to Modern Times
Previously--MFW K , 1st, CtoG, RTR, Exp. to 1850

Julie in MN
Posts: 2928
Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 3:44 pm
Location: Minnesota

Dictionary skills - When does MFW introduce these?

Unread post by Julie in MN » Mon Nov 05, 2007 2:12 pm

bethben wrote:I've been wondering about where in the language arts program do they introduce stuff like dictionary skills. How to find stuff in the library...researching skills...I'm not one to just do stuff like that on my own. I do better as a teacher when I have something to go off of. Does any of the language arts accomplish this?
Beth
Hi Beth,
Well, here are a few to start with:

* CTG definitely covers dictionary skills all year with a dictionary day each week during the vocabulary (Greek root words).

* ECC covers some research skills for older kids doing the geography packets. Some of us use the internet a lot for that (as is common in colleges today), but a few prefer to focus on library skills during that time.

* EX1850 walks you through writing a state report. Haven't done that yet, but it should build some skills.

* Older kids in ECC (grades 7-8) also get help writing country reports, and researching different facts on those countries.

* ILL has a few assignments that we have used to do a bit of research. One was about the different parts of a lion or cat or something. My son ended up doing a power point presentation, with photos he took of his cat and info he gleaned from our encyclopedias.

* Book basket is sort of your own private, relevant "research library" all set up for you... If not specifically used for "research," then at least familiarity with library materials is guaranteed!

I'm sure others will think of more,
Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

cbollin

Unread post by cbollin » Mon Nov 05, 2007 3:06 pm

A few more things to add in with Julie’s list for dictionary use:
* the vocabulary with English from the Roots Up starts in CTG and continues in RTR
* I found various dictionary skills in Intermediate Language Lessons --basic looking up words---especially in some of those poems and prose pieces. Poor me --- I don’t know them sometimes. As well as some lessons on pronunciation guides are in ILL.

But where dictionary skills really seem to shine the most in the MFW recommendations is in Spelling Power.
*Spelling Power has dictionary skills as part of it as well. That can be part of the “last 5 minutes” of SP lesson each day, as well as the other suggested ways in the SP manual. SP has a section called Building Dictionary Skills (starts on page 271 of 4th edition) and SP provides a scope and sequence for dictionary skills in Appendix B, starting on page 317.

And...
* there is a unit on dictionary skills in Applications of Grammar, which MFW recommends in 8th (or 7th) grade. That unit will cover it if you don't get to dictionary skills in elementary years using less formal methods.

-crystal

WindriderMom
Posts: 4
Joined: Wed Aug 29, 2007 10:24 am

Unread post by WindriderMom » Mon Nov 05, 2007 5:12 pm

Also, MFW recommends Progeny Press for reading/literature and I belive these language arts skills are covered there. We have been using Progeny and just ordered a Language Plus book for 21 Balloons that will take about a semester to complete.

cbollin

I have GAPS....GASP! Spelling/word "stuff"

Unread post by cbollin » Sat Feb 05, 2011 1:42 pm

annaz wrote:What all does spelling power cover? homonyms? synonyms, analogies, etc? I can't find what it EXACTLY covers. I'm sort of freaking out. We came from another curric that uses dictation as spelling and I am seriously missing huge parts of subjects. I'm finding out how seriously lacking we are in just plain word work. Homonyms, synonyms, analogies, homophones; all that; prefix, suffix, etc. :~ I find that there's a lot of words she doesn't know what they mean as much as I thought, even though she reads alot.

Big question! So when using MFW does using WS, ILL, SP all work together as a whole to pick up the slack in other areas? So for example, I know that BJU Reading, Grammar and Spelling programs covers it ALL! KWIM? It may be overkill in some areas, but there's no gaps. I'd rather skip than forget or not have it there entirely. I know we'll always have holes, but I have gaps. !!
Hi Ann,

Homonyms: in the strictest sense that where you have the same spelling, same way to say it, but it has various meanings. I’m not eating a stalk of celery. And I did not stalk you on the forum. those are homonyms in the strictest sense of the word.

The other meaning of the word is more of homophones where word sounds same, but spell differently. Yes, those will be covered in any spelling program. (and on Veggie Tales.... homophones, homophones where the crews coming cruising on the plane... homophone homophone I need my kneaded biscuits plain!

But, yes there are in ILL (check the index)

Synonyms: that’s where you use a different word with same meaning. (big, large) I think that tends to be in writing and maybe in some of the English. Honestly, I think that’s vocab development and comes through reading books to children and talking and introducing new words to them. Yes, there are some brief lessons in ILL on this, lesson 179. But once they have that word in their vocab you just remind them at “syn” mean same – they get to learn that in English from the Roots UP. Some of it will show up when they do writing and you want them to use a “stronger” word to better describe it and sound more “fancified”.

Analogies? I’m confused. That has nothing to do with spelling, does it? Do you mean those things on standardized tests where they say BIG IS TO LARGE AS Small is to _____
a. fish. B. dish. C. fried rice. D. tiny
you can get analogy books for fun and do those lightly.

Or do you mean similes and metaphors? Check index on ILL.

Prefixes and suffixes? I find that as we go along in everyday life, we naturally check for prefixes -- re, un, dis,
suffixes: that's covered in spelling... ed, es, ing, tion

Some of this is covered in the Roots Word study in English from Roots Up too.

MFW includes dictation exercises with Bible memory work. There is a section of Spelling Power than can be done as dictation exercises. That’s a step where the student writes sentences with the words she is studying. Instead of having them make up their own sentences, you could dictate sentences to them.

What’s really going on here? Are you concerned about standardized testing or something? I’m not really hearing a question about Spelling Power here. Spelling Power is a spelling program and also has some dictionary skill and proofreading information.??

Over the course of it all in grades 2-8, all of those things you mentioned are covered in various components of language arts in MFW. The only thing in my head that isn't, comes with the analogies thing. Logic is taught, but not necessarily word base analogies in elementary.

-crystal

annaz
Posts: 54
Joined: Fri Mar 24, 2006 7:34 pm

Re: I have GAPS....GASP! Spelling/word "stuff"

Unread post by annaz » Sat Feb 05, 2011 2:25 pm

Hi Crystal. Your friendly neighbor having a freak moment. Panicking (sp?) is a serious job.

Okay, so I'll go back and re-read ILL (sigh) and look for that. I need to read it as a whole and stop reading it for the topic of "my" moment.

I am assuming that what I'm missing is all the stuff I think Spelling Power may contain and should I be using it or "something like it"? I wanted to know what SP contained to see if this rounded out what we are missing. (We're not using it, do we need it, should we be using it...sort of thought process.) I guess the initial question was whether all bases are covered in MFW to include my main panic topics listed above and is SP what it is that we are missing?

The last curriculum I used really didn't cover a lot of this. I probably asked 3 times. Lack of answers scare me. The biggest problem is when you switch programs, there are things you like and things you dump. So I keep some, and find out one doesn't work without the other. And...I am missing vocabulary work, word work.

ROFLOL...no not a standards person! Heck, we never test. HOWEVER... there is a nagging feeling of comparing, did I, should I, what if that continues to yell at me in my little head. It gets so confusing, because everyone covers it in different time periods. Some really late and some really early and some not at all. And ... I need to eat lunch.

cbollin

Re: I have GAPS....GASP! Spelling/word "stuff"

Unread post by cbollin » Sat Feb 05, 2011 3:42 pm

There are some children for whom spelling does not need to be a separate subject. I think Julie in MN"s son was one of them. I think one of the Hazell daughters was one of those as well.

What is in SP - the big "scary orange book?"

There are parts of the SP book that sometimes I think we (as homeschooling teachers) don't take the time to read through because they are not essential to doing the program. But just now I was reading through it and thinking... I'd love to re-organize this book again.

Sections in the book tell you in more detail about "the rules". I never saw those until today!!!! I've had this book since 2003. spelling rules are right there in the book in the parts that everyone is so scared to use.

There's a section on proofreading skills.

There's notes on homophone things.

yes, suffixes are taught as games

the SP company even sells pre made colored magnetic tiles even with special letters..... I just re-sold myself on using Spelling Power after going through the book.

don't tell me I just talked myself in to using SP again.... I know that dictionary skills are covered in ILL, but..... sigh......... I over think these things. this stuff was here all the time.

Ann, basically in SP, you are working through groups of spelling rules to help with phonics and "non phonics"rules. It's done in a multisensory way so that you review phonics, practice words specific to that rule, study words that you miss, don't fret about studying words you got right, and then build skills.

-crystal

TriciaMR
Posts: 1000
Joined: Thu Sep 20, 2007 11:43 am

Re: I have GAPS....GASP! Spelling/word "stuff"

Unread post by TriciaMR » Sat Feb 05, 2011 5:43 pm

I remember someone saying once (or maybe reading it once), that if you study Proverbs, there are lots of analogies in there...

Crystal, I read through SP (but I have the 3rd edition) and I didn't find all that stuff... Maybe I read too fast... Like I said, one day you and I will come up with something ;)

-Trish
Trish - Wife to Phil, Mom to Toni(18), Charlie(14), and Trent(14)
2014-2015 - AHL, CTG
2015-2016 - WHL, RTR
2016-2017 - EXP1850, US1877
2017-2018 - DE, 1850MOD
2018-2019 - College, AHL
My blog

cbollin

Re: I have GAPS....GASP! Spelling/word "stuff"

Unread post by cbollin » Sat Feb 05, 2011 7:34 pm

Trish,
TriciaMR wrote:I remember someone saying once (or maybe reading it once), that if you study Proverbs, there are lots of analogies in there...
that's a great point!

like sands through the hour glass....
Crystal, I read through SP (but I have the 3rd edition) and I didn't find all that stuff... Maybe I read too fast... Like I said, one day you and I will come up with something ;)
things to look for in the table of contents whether it is 3rd or 4th edition
this is harder than I realized....

4th edition has a part in the section called What Research Says with the rules for the group numbers. In 3rd edition it's page...345 BUT in 4th edition, it has a few extra tips....

scope and sequence for Spelling Skills is p. 98 in 3rd edition, or page 315-316 in 4th edition
Scope/sequence for dictionary skills, 3rd edition. p. 99, or page 317-318 in 4th

check the glossary for cool definitions like open and closed syllables. both edition.
check table of contents for homophone sections. 3rd section
check the list of "tough words" Words Commonly Misspelled by Elementary Students /high school, business....

you know, I just can't cross reference it. my brain totally shut down now. I feel like Charley in Flowers for Algeron
-crystal

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