Handwriting - Encouraging proper pencil grip, right OR left

Copywork, Cursive, Dictation, Grammar, Handwriting, Letter Writing, Memory Work, Narration, Read-Alouds, Spelling, Vocabulary, & Writing (many of these topics apply to other subjects such as Bible, History, and Science)
Julie in MN
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Re: Handwriting question?

Unread post by Julie in MN » Thu Aug 27, 2009 9:25 am

cbollin wrote:well, ok. been working hard with occupational therapists for 3-4 years with my youngest. I'm a failure. every time she picks up a writing instrument we have to remind her what to do. I'm a failure. why am I answering....
Crystal,
I hold my pencil wrong! I had the occasional teacher who would grab my pencil out of my hand while I was writing. Yet I can write very fast & am neater than most. It'll be okay...
Julie
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Amy C.
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Re: Handwriting question?

Unread post by Amy C. » Thu Aug 27, 2009 1:04 pm

Thanks so much, Alison, for the website links. They have some good teaching tips and ideas. I was especially encouraged that an incorrect pencil grip could be corrected at any age as testified by the Draw Your World founder. :)

Thanks, again!
Amy C.

TriciaMR
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Re: Handwriting question?

Unread post by TriciaMR » Fri Aug 28, 2009 1:23 pm

I read a blog I think... It takes at least 21 days to change a habit. She said her oldest (11 or 12?) was holding the pencil wrong. She mad a deal - some amount of money (maybe $50?) to change his grip. He was allowed to use the special pencil grips (the rounded triangle ones with the special places for thumb and pointer) for the first half of the month. Then the second half of the month, no pencil grip. And he did it! Dangle a big enough carrot out there, and they can change. I notice I tend to wrap my thumb up a little around my writing utensils. Hasn't killed my writing. My dd HATES the pencil grips, but I may have to hang a carrot out there. We've tried and tried to work on holding it correctly. Oh, and she only *required* it during writing. The rest of the subjects (math, etc), she didn't.

My little guys - well, one holds his pencil very nicely - actually uses a 3 finger grip - the third finger is holding the pencil, but he's not resting it on the ring finger. (He just copied all the words off a poster on a door.) My lefty, well, I gently remind him every time we do writing. I have him "check" his grip, and then he holds correctly.

-Trish
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RachelT
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Re: Handwriting question?

Unread post by RachelT » Sat Aug 29, 2009 7:06 am

Hi! We have been working on my son's pencil grip for the last few years and last year in 2nd grade, we finally got him into occupational therapy. What actually worked for him was a pencil weight. It's something that is placed around the pencil about 3/4 of the way toward the eraser and it helps it to fall back into the place between his thumb and forefinger, where it's supposed to go. Before that we used Handwriting Without Tears pencils, little golf-sized pencils with erasers where they have to pinch it more because it is smaller. Both helped, but he was younger. We also do things like work with putty and try to find small coins wrapped inside it to strengthen his hands.

I think the question is whether it is truly uncomfortable or causing handwriting to not be readable or if it is a matter of working back up to a larger amount of writing if they have had a summer break or are writing more than in the past.
If you can read the writing pretty well, you may not want to go to the trouble to change his grip, unless it feels more comfortable to him. He may need to stop and do other things and come back to the writing if it's just that his hand is getting tired. Just a thought...

Rachel :)
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momem3
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handwriting for a lefty

Unread post by momem3 » Fri Jul 23, 2010 10:35 am

Alison wrote:Hi, I have an almost 4 year old girl who is clearly a lefty. I want to teach her the letters of her name. For those of you with experience, do you teach the letters the same with a lefty as a righty?
Just wondering.
Thanks.
Coming from an adult "southpaw"...do not do anything differently as far as technique goes. Encourage her and ensure that she doesn't feel "different" or "odd". If anyone in your family or any of your adult friends are lefties, ask them to help her learn to do things with her left hand. Trust me, this will put you leaps and bounds ahead of the curve in lefty world. I actually had a 2nd grade teacher who told my mom I wasn't able to write since I was left-handed. Seriously? Another good reason to homeschool!

As far as being a lefty goes, we have trouble with handwriting, utensils, playing/batting balls, playing billiards, bowling, etc just because everyone shows us how to do it with our right. I actually learned how to do many things right-handed, which is fine, but I might have been better at those things if I had learned how to do them left.

I hope this helps...just my thoughts looking back on my lefty life.
Emily
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TriciaMR
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Re: handwriting for a lefty

Unread post by TriciaMR » Fri Jul 23, 2010 11:04 am

My other advice (one of my kids is a lefty), was from an adult friend who I noticed didn't wrap his hand around his pen to write... He said it was his mother sat opposite of him to show him how to write, so it was a mirror image, rather than next to him. I would use Handwriting Without Tears, as they always have a model to the right for the lefties to look at, or above the line, since their left hand often covers up what they are suppose to copy.

Look on-line for hand-strengthening exercises to do for your lefty. One fun one - get a cheap squirt gun (not a blaster), and set up paper or styrofoam cups and have her shoot them down with her left hand. Rolling out play-dough is another good one.

Do lots of large motor movements - writing letters with chalk on the sidewalk. Drawing letters large in the air. Do lots of finger tracing in salt/sand trays. Use smaller pencils/chalk/crayons so she has to use a tripod grip rather than a fist.

So far, my lefty isn't wrapping his hand around, but I watch him like a hawk. He's also used a pencil grip for a while to work on holding his pencil properly.

-Trish
Last edited by TriciaMR on Fri Jul 23, 2010 11:09 am, edited 1 time in total.
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RachelT
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Re: handwriting for a lefty

Unread post by RachelT » Fri Jul 23, 2010 11:08 am

Hi! We don't have any lefties here, but I did want to say that we use Handwriting Without Tears and it's supposed to be helpful to lefties.

Rachel
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gratitude
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Problem Solved!

Unread post by gratitude » Sat Mar 12, 2011 8:58 pm

:-) My biggest problem with my oldest ds, who is 7, has been handwriting. I always thought he was Left handed, but when he started writing he apparently copied me and wrote with his right hand. Oh my! We were sitting at dinner tonight, and I noticed that he eats left-handed. He says he draws left handed (no wonder he enjoys it). He also bats left-handed, and throws left-handed. No wonder writing with his right hand has been so difficult.

So I guess this shows how distracted I have been since our fourth child was born two years ago. I taught him to write when she was 5 months old, and I was very unfocused.

I don't think this could happen to anyone else ;) , but I thought I would share in case it was the problem for another little boy & his mom.

Thank you Lord for returning my ability to focus as a mom. Praise God.

Posted by gratitude » Tue Mar 22, 2011 8:36 am
TriciaMR wrote:There's an exercise Dianne Craft recommends to help the brain decide. It's called Bilateral Drawing.
Thank you Trish! I used this exercise and it helped confirm what I thought. It was an interesting exercise, and we all gave it a try. My DH & I noticed that we could easily draw with both hands , but that we would watch and focus on our non-dominance hand. I noticed my ds7 doing the same thing. He was watching his right hand and thinking about doing it, where as his left hand would draw the zig zags without him having to think about it. So I started with him yesterday at the Kindergarten level, to learn his letters with the left hand. What a joy! He needs to practice his left hand, but he can write left handed without complaint / pain / hand twisting / etc! He also is no longer complaining about having to 'think too hard' while writing. So he is going to learn to write all over again, with his left hand this time; and in the mean-time do his other work orally. Now I understand why my second ds5 learned handwriting so easily, and why it was such a painful struggle for my first born.

Joy.. oh Joy! Happy home schooling mom! :-)
Last edited by gratitude on Sun Mar 13, 2011 9:26 am, edited 2 times in total.

Julie in MN
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Re: Problem Solved!

Unread post by Julie in MN » Sat Mar 12, 2011 11:54 pm

So you're saying that he was writing with his right hand but really he is left-handed?

I do think it can be confusing, so don't blame yourself totally! My dh is left-handed in *most* things but not all.

Glad you're getting some breathing room to notice these things. And I'm sure the heads-up will end up helping someone else, too!

Julie
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jasntas
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Re: Problem Solved!

Unread post by jasntas » Sat Mar 12, 2011 11:55 pm

That's interesting... I just discovered Friday that my dd can write with both her left and right. I have been puzzled as to why she writes with her right hand the way a left handed person writes. I'm not sure how to describe it but she curves her wrist. I always tell her not to 'break' her wrist. In other words to keep it straight with her hand.

I'm not for sure yet if she is left handed, right handed or ambidextrous at this point. She was just playing around and discovered she could write as well with her left as she could with her right. Her brother, well, wasn't as successful.

Don't be too hard on yourself. I don't even have any little ones under her to distract me and it never dawned on me that she could possibly be a lefty. :)
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TriciaMR
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Re: Problem Solved!

Unread post by TriciaMR » Sun Mar 13, 2011 9:22 am

My lefty isn't a pure lefty - he writes, throws, eats, and golfs left handed, but bats right handed (or at least he used to). My right-handed boy - he writes, throws, eats, golfs, and bats right handed, but in P.E. class he holds the hockey stick and la cross thing (sorry, I forgot what Coach called it) as a lefty.

But, from what I've read, that can actually be normal.

It can take a while for "handed-ness" to firm up, but usually it does by 6.

There's an exercise Dianne Craft recommends to help the brain decide. It's called Bilateral Drawing. She said that it is especially useful for young children who have not yet established a hand dominance. Have the child stand at a chalkboard or white board, with a chalk/marker in each hand. The child should draw with both hands, making a mirror image. (You may have to guide their hands at first, making zig-zags on the board saying, "in, out, in, out.") But, really, only do this if they are switching hands during cutting or writing. She said doing this for 5 minutes a day for 3 weeks will usually help them establish a hand dominance.

The main thing is teaching lefties to tilt their paper so it is parallel to their arm so they can see what they are doing under their hand, so they don't need to "wrap" their hand. You would think that it would be symmetrical (writing left or right), but it's not always (eye-dominance can sometimes be a factor). I think they also need to hold the pencil just a hair higher up, again, to see what they just wrote and be able to continue to write.

-Trish
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NJCheryl
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Re: Problem Solved!

Unread post by NJCheryl » Sun Mar 13, 2011 11:20 am

Writing with the wrist bent is called back-handed writing. Interesting thing - I am left handed and do not write back-handed. My husband is right handed and he writes back handed. Out of our 3 kiddos, 2 are lefties and one is a rightie.

Cheryl

amelasky
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Re: Problem Solved!

Unread post by amelasky » Tue Mar 15, 2011 9:18 am

I discovered at the beginning of Kindergarten with my son this year, that he could write equally well with both of his hands. He now writes only with his left hand because he says it "feels better." He eats, bowls and writes left-handed. In baseball, he throws right handed. Shoots hoops right handed, etc.

It confused us for a little while, but I would lay his pencil down on his schoolwork, and let him pick it up and decide which hand to use. He would 99% of the time write left-handed. He has proper grip, doesn't "break" his wrist and doesn't seem to mind writing at all now. It's not his favorite thing to do, but he does well at it.

I don't know if that really helps any at all, but I wanted you to know that I've been there. I would encourage proper grip and wrist position with whatever hand he finally settles on.
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HSmommi2mine
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Re: Problem Solved!

Unread post by HSmommi2mine » Tue Mar 15, 2011 9:56 am

Friends of ours adopted a little girl when she was 3 yo. She had always had a difficult time in school, LD's and all. When she was 16 they had her evaluated by a specialist who determined that she was really Left handed. Somewhere in her previous life she had been required to switch to being right handed and it hindered her all of those years. They switched her hands and her LD's disappeared.

At least you caught it so young!
~Christina

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Busymom
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Help! How do I do this? (Teaching him to hold his penci

Unread post by Busymom » Fri Mar 18, 2011 5:59 pm

Mom2theteam wrote:My oldest son is almost 5.5 years old. We started K in December only to discover it was a little too early for him. So, I have backed off. We are still trying to do some type of "school" activity several days a week. Included in that, I am trying to include a lot of fine motor skill activities for him since he was having such a hard time with the writing. I have him doing lacing and cutting and play dough and other fine motor skill activities. I also have a lot of workbooks with pages with tracing and mazes and such. He does enjoy doing workbooks.

Here is the issue, he HATES to hold his pencil properly. I have a very hard time getting him to do it. He is awkward and I have a hard time getting his fingers positioned well. Then, he will inevitably move them before too long. He complains anytime I say he has to hold it properly (although, when I offer to just put it away, he says no). I bought him a pencil grip and that doesn't help much.

I think if he develops a habit of holding it wrong (and I do mean totally wrong), it will be really hard to change later. Am I off base in that? I'm at a loss here on what to do and when to "force" him to hold it correctly. Should I only make him when specifically working on this or even when doing "school" crafts and coloring on his own.

I'm getting discouraged and feeling like if I can't teach this basic thing, I may not be cut out for homeschooling. (Although, I know in my head, I must be able to do this or God wouldn't have called us to it. ;) ) Anyway, back to the topic, any tips or insight on how to help him learn to hold his pencil?

Also, similar question, should I be teaching my 3 year olds to hold it properly when they color too? If so, any tips on a right handed mom teaching a left handed 3 year old boy? His sister is right handed, but he is clearly left handed. We noticed it even before he turned 2. I'm trying to teach him to hold it straight and not curved around like I used to see kids when I was in school.

Thank you!!! I really appreciate the wonderful posters here and how helpful you all have been to me thus far. Hopefully, sometime in the next few years, I will be much more acclimated and able to help others like me who have no clue! :-)
I'm no expert, and I'm not going to tell you what to do (because I really don't know!). However, I have an 11 yr. old dd who totally holds her pencil wrong. She rests it on her 4th finger, rather than the 3rd. BUT her handwriting is beautiful, which makes it hard to argue with her. (I have actually caught myself holding the pencil "incorrectly" when scribbling my grocery lists.) When I see it during school time, I'll correct her. But, honestly, I'm not going to watch for every time she's holding a pencil. She likes to make her own little "books," so she writes a lot when I'm not around. I don't feel she's been damaged for life, but I have pointed out to her that if she ever writes for a long period her fingers might cramp up. My 9 yr. old dd (a lefty) also holds her pencil like her sister, and she too has beautiful penmanship. --I have no idea how I missed this when they were younger! :~

I am being more watchful with my younger ones. I'm trying to teach them "how" to hold their pencil, to slant their paper, and to write "under" the word they're writing (not to the side or on top, if that makes sense). My kindergartner sometimes struggles with remembering how to hold a pencil right, and she likes to use those pencil grips that look like this http://www.thewritingpenstore.com/TheMi ... 2pack.aspx
(Wow, there are a lot of grip options out there! I've never seen that website before. Maybe they'll have some better options for your son.)

So, I guess, all in all, catch it when they're young because it is really hard (maybe even pointless?) to change the habit when they're older. As far as how often and for which activities? That's a hard one, in my opinion, based on his age, and the fact that I'm right there learning with you (since I already blew it with some of my older ones, lol). It might be awkward now, but that might change in just a few months. I think it's great that you're doing all the tactile/motor skills activities though. That will help a lot. And, no, this doesn't mean you're not cut out for homeschooling. lol Believe me, I'm always wondering if I'm doing it "right" or if I'm going to ruin my kids for life. :) It's hard when you don't have any adult children yet who've "made it." That's why I'm so thankful for message boards like this, and just the homeschooling community in general. Blessings to you on this incredible journey!
Tiffany, Mom to 9 (ages 16 mo. to 14 yrs; 5 girls and 4 boys)

DS4home
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Re: Help! How do I do this? (Teaching him to hold his penci

Unread post by DS4home » Fri Mar 18, 2011 6:21 pm

I don't have any personal experience with this, but I have heard that using small broken crayons or those small pencils used on the golf course are good to use. When the writing pencil/crayon is small enough it sort of forces the proper three finger grip. I don't know how to really describe it better :~ But I've heard that is a good place to start anyway. :)

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TriciaMR
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Re: Help! How do I do this? (Teaching him to hold his penci

Unread post by TriciaMR » Fri Mar 18, 2011 7:06 pm

Try using small (1 inch) pieces of chalk on a chalkboard. You can't fist hold a 1-inch chalk or crayon.

Bribe him. Say if you hold it right during "practice" time and not complain, he'll get 5 m&m's (or whatever).

Then, work up to a week, then a month.

Keep it short, and don't correct when it's not "school" time.

Check the Handwriting Without Tears site for other ideas.

Use triangle-shaped crayons and pencils.

-Trish
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kanderson
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Re: Help! How do I do this? (Teaching him to hold his penci

Unread post by kanderson » Fri Mar 18, 2011 8:56 pm

If so, any tips on a right handed mom teaching a left handed 3 year old boy?
My oldest ds is left handed and my MIL gave me a good tip on how to help them as my husband and his brother are both left handed. It worked with them and works well for us. .... Sit across the table holding their hand (your right to their left). Hope that makes sense. And also want to add that it really helps a lefty to tilt their page. Writing on a straight vertical paper is very difficult when first learning. At least that has been our experience. Hope this helps!
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Poohbee
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Re: Help! How do I do this? (Teaching him to hold his penci

Unread post by Poohbee » Sat Mar 19, 2011 12:38 am

Well, it's true your child won't be ruined for life if he doesn't learn how to hold his pencil correctly. I hold my pencil on my ring finger, probably much like Tiffany's daughters, and I used to win contests in elementary school for my handwriting. It's funny, because my mom taught me how to write, and I hold my pencil just like she does. We both have a big callous on our ring fingers. But, I digress. It will be okay, even if your son doesn't hold his pencil correctly.

I had a similar problem with my eldest daughter. She didn't hold her pencil correctly until she was 6 or 6.5, and she learned by using a pencil grip like the ones Tiffany recommended. With my 2nd dd, who just turned 6 and is doing kindergarten work this year, I started her off right away with one of those pencil grips.

On another note, my oldest dd refused to hold her scissors correctly, no matter how many times I tried to correct her and urge her to hold them correctly. She is 9.5, and I still don't think she holds her scissors correctly. So, I guess there's always some issue with kids...it's just different issues for different kids.
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RachelT
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Re: Help! How do I do this? (Teaching him to hold his penci

Unread post by RachelT » Sat Mar 19, 2011 7:27 am

My son went to occupational therapy for his handwriting for a year and we learned that putting some weight on the end of his pencil helped him to keep it in the right position, later on. (A pencil topper or large eraser.)

Rachel
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Re: Help! How do I do this? (Teaching him to hold his penci

Unread post by mamacastle2 » Sat Mar 19, 2011 8:02 am

Check out this website - http://www.handithings.com/handiwriter.htm. Within a week, my son wasn't fist holding his pencil anymore.
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Re: Help! How do I do this? (Teaching him to hold his penci

Unread post by RachelT » Sat Mar 19, 2011 10:14 am

Handwriting Without Tears has been a HUGE help for our family in this area! They have all kinds of ideas. From them, I found that using small broken pieces of chalk or crayons helped a lot because of their size. Then, my son used small, golf pencils for at least a year or two. HWT has them with erasers on the top! (Most other office stores sell the golf pencils without erasers.)

The HWT teacher's manuals talk about this and show you how their hand should look. We also used their little slates for handwriting practice in the beginning. You really should check out their website at hwtears.com
Mom2theteam wrote:If you did HWT, did you do that in addition to your K curriculum? Did you skip the handwriting page in the MFW worksheets and sub HWT or do both? I have looked at it in the past, when I was thinking of a different curriculum all together. I think I may go ahead and order the "Get Set for School" stuff for now. I will probably stick with the program since I feel so lost in teaching handwriting to the kids. But, I've already learned from the experienced not to plan too far ahead. I think it's okay to plan this fall though. :)

If I do order the Get Set For School, should I order enough for my 3 year olds also? They turned 3 in Dec. So, they are young 3's. I think I already know the answer is that I should wait at least a year, but I know they want to do all the things that Zack does. It's easier to do it all together.
My sod did the handwriting in K, but he really needed more practice and so we used the HWT hands-on activities (Mat Man, clay, the slates, and the wooden letter formation blocks). I think we also did the 1st book then. When we used MFW 1st grade we used their copywork, but after a few months I found that he really needed the HWT practice and I have continued to use those books for our handwriting practice. Now, in the older programs I use their 2 lined paper for copywork of Bible verses. We have also used our HWT cursive book to learn cursive about a year.

The HWT books are supposed to work just as well for left handed students as they do for right handed students. I would go ahead and purchase the teacher's manual for whatever level you are teaching because they really give specific teaching tips and instructions. My younger child is a girl and I always went ahead and worked on her handwriting alongside her brother because it was easier for her than for him, although she is two years younger. The 3 year olds can definitely enjoy the hands-on activities if you get them and the music cd's! That would be a good way to begin with them and then you can add in the workbooks if they want to try it.
Mom2theteam wrote:Thanks Rachel. That helps a lot. I'm glad to see that your son enjoyed the wooden letters and such. At least all the non-consumables will get lots of use in our house. I have the 5 year old and the 3 year old twins, but I also have 11 month old twins and we will probably have more. So, I feel like I have a mini-preschool going and can justify getting things based on the amount of use they will get. :-)

Do I need anything extra to make the Mat Man?? It looks like he uses the Wooden letter pieces and mat. All I would need extra are the hands. Is that right? Do the kids do anything with Mat Man other than build him on the floor? I see him referenced a lot, but I'm not finding a lot of info on what his purpose is. Also, can I do "Roll-a-Dough" letters without their product using play dough? Thanks for all your help!!!!
Hi Heather! You will definitely get lots of use out of these materials with your little preschool household! How fun! Five years ago, when I first began using HWT we only had Mat Man and a cd with some songs that talk about the parts of his body and how you make his arms, legs, hands, feet, ears, eyes, etc. So, we traced the kids' hands and feet and cut them out and then we saved a few bottle caps for eyes and the nose. We used the mat and wooden pieces to make the rest of him. I think you can make the letters without their "Roll A Dough" kit. We didn't use it as much as the little slates and the magnetic board (like a little magna-doodle). The reason that I bought the Roll A Dough kit is that it has a laminated card for each letter and you can actually place your dough on it to make the correct shapes of the letter being formed. The little slates are just the right size to make the printed letters and we now have larger slates for writing words in cursive.

:) Rachel
Rachel, wife to Doug ~ 1995, mom to J (17) and B (15)
MFW K (twice), 1st (twice), Adv., ECC, & CtG 2006-2010,
Classical Conversations 2010-2016,
ECC/AHL 2016-17, eclectic 2017-18, WHL & US1 2018-19

http://rachelsreflections-rachelt.blogspot.com/

Mom2theteam
Posts: 184
Joined: Thu Nov 11, 2010 12:33 pm

Re: Help! How do I do this? (Teaching him to hold his penci

Unread post by Mom2theteam » Sat Mar 19, 2011 11:11 am

Thanks for all the tips!! I'm not too much a stickler for him holding it exactly correctly. I don't hold mine right. But, he is way off, with the pencil end tipped forward in his hand instead of back and his index finger...I don't even know how to describe it except to say it's way off, not just resting on the wrong finger. The other thing is, I rest mine on my 4th finger and my hand cramps easily. (Plus, I have awful handwriting. :~ ) I'm halfheartedly trying to correct my pencil grip too. :-)
mamacastle2 wrote:Check out this website - http://www.handithings.com/handiwriter.htm. Within a week, my son wasn't fist holding his pencil anymore.
I was just looking at this! It is so cool!!! This is why I love forums. I never would have found this on my own. Networking with other moms has provided me with so much insight and turned me on to so many wonderful products that I don't think I would have otherwise found. I think this would make a HUGE difference for my son. He holds his pencil so that the end of it is tipped forward. This would easily correct it and help with his finger position too. It's so cool, I want to fix my grip. LOL! Thanks for posting about it. I'm going to order at least one.

Okay, I'll be having a talk with my hubby tonight about all the new school things I want for me...I mean for the kids. 8[]
Heather
Wife to an amazing man
Mom to 6, ages 10, 7, 7, 5, 5, 3
Zack, 10 CtG
Samantha & Blake, twins, 7, CtG
Matthew & Joshua, twins, 5, MFW K
Nicholas, 3 derailing and tagging along

sewgirlie
Posts: 17
Joined: Mon Jan 10, 2011 7:31 pm

Re: Help! How do I do this? (Teaching him to hold his penci

Unread post by sewgirlie » Sat Mar 19, 2011 6:01 pm

HWT has some YouTube videos that helped us. I realized that I hadn't taught my son the names of his fingers, no wonder he didn't know what I was asking him to do :-) !

Carrie

cbollin

Finger grip?

Unread post by cbollin » Mon Jan 16, 2012 12:55 pm

SarahP wrote:My 5 year old has good handwriting and good finger grip when using a tri-pod pencil grip. But does not hold a pencil or crayon in the "proper" way if he does not have a grip - he holds it with his thumb on one side, his three middle fingers widely spaced on the other side and his pinky finger kind of pointing and resting at a point in between his thumb and ring finger. It makes it hard for him to write neatly or have a firm grip. His handwriting is very nice with the finger grip - should I work with him on his grip or should I continue to have him use the tri-pod gripper and let it work itself out?
uh uh uh.... uh.. I'd keep using the gripper
mix in some learning activities that promote tripod grasp such as
http://schools.fsusd.k12.ca.us/schools/mundy/OT.htm
or
http://www.otplan.com/articles/pencil-g ... terns.aspx

call it game time

and then try once in a while without it

why? because as an adult I sometimes still use a wrist and thumb brace while exercising so that I don't hurt myself.

-crystal

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