Handwriting - Questions, especially on legibility expectatio

Copywork, Cursive, Dictation, Grammar, Handwriting, Letter Writing, Memory Work, Narration, Read-Alouds, Spelling, Vocabulary, & Writing (many of these topics apply to other subjects such as Bible, History, and Science)
4Truth
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Re: How to encourage neatness.....

Unread post by 4Truth » Sat Mar 05, 2011 8:44 am

In addition to some of the other suggestions that have been given, I have a mantra that goes like this: "Copywork should never have a mistake." And then as I see consistency in their copywork, I require it in dictation and written narrations, too. Mapwork must be neat or we won't be able to tell what's where? Can you imagine if the cartographers were in such a hurry that they didn't care what it looked like?

I don't require neatness or perfect spelling or any of that in their free writing. It's their *free* writing. But in assigned schoolwork, letters or papers that are going to be read by someone else, etc. it must be neat. If they grow up and can't neatly fill out a job application (for example), then they won't get the job. So this is life training, too. ;)
Donna, with two MFW graduates and the "baby" in 11th grade! %| Using MFW since 2004.

ChristyH
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Re: How to encourage neatness.....

Unread post by ChristyH » Sat Mar 05, 2011 8:59 am

I bought some graph paper that was in a spiral bound notebook for math and each square get's a number. This helps them not make so many mistakes due to sloppy work and not having the problems lined up right.
Also If it isn't neat enough then they need to rewrite it. They know this now and they pretty much don't care to write papers out more then once.. ;)
Married Scott, 1992
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shera
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Re: How to encourage neatness.....

Unread post by shera » Sat Mar 05, 2011 10:03 pm

One of the things I have implemented is a "neatness score or grade". So when I am checking if math or LA is correct I will grade it and give a neatness grade. For some reason that has helped ds.
Sarah
ds 11/01
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dd 07/09

jasntas
Posts: 469
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Handwriting--How far to push??

Unread post by jasntas » Thu Jul 07, 2011 1:42 pm

carissa wrote:I have a 7yo ds who has been fairly slow to develop the fine motor for handwriting. He's gone from hating handwriting in K to enthusiastically completing more copywork than I ask him to at the end of 1st gr. (I should say, not always!) I typically ask him to write 3 lines of a verse or passage, and he often takes delight in "surprising" me by finishing the page. :-)

Now, my question is, how much to encourage him to aim for the lines? He says, "Mom, I'm trying to make my handwriting fast but good!" His letters usually land between the sky and grass, but he doesn't really seem to try keeping his lowercase letters between the fence and the grass. I'm hesitant to push him too much and go back to "hating" handwriting, and a little correction goes a long way when it comes to school work (because he's a perfectionist who will sometimes cry if his work doesn't turn out like he envisioned it). I was thinking maybe I should make specific Penmanship Pages and gently encourage him to aim for the lines on those short assignments (just make a few letters as perfectly as possible), and then let him police himself on writing for other subjects?

Oh, I should mention that he's a lefty. And specifically about that, how important is it that he put his hand below his writing so that he's not covering up what he's just written? I know that's recommended, and I remind him, but he naturally covers his previous writing. His wrist is not curled or cramped in a weird way. Do I let it go, or require him to write from below? If I should keep on him about this, should I let the issue of aiming for the lines issue go for a while so I'm not harping on two areas?

Sometimes it's hard to know where the balance is between pushing them for excellence and pushing them too far.
Hi Carissa.
My advice would be to try the Handwriting Without Tears program. As I understand it, it's supposed to be good for lefty's as well. I think it may have originally been designed for lefty's.

HTH
carissa wrote:We used Handwriting Without Tears before. I transitioned him because the three-line paper is just everywhere, such as MFW-1 and ADV student packets, grammar, writing, and spelling programs, etc. We used the colored paper (blue sky, red fence, green grass) to make it easy to distinguish the lines during the transition. I'm still not sure how much accuracy to require, or how hard to push on where he places his hand in relation to the letters. :~ Thanks again!
Well, I don't have any advice on how hard to push. My ds is dyslexic and he will probably always be all over the map with his writing. :~ I'm just glad when he voluntarily wants to write at all. We're still working on improving though. :)

Hopefully someone with more experience will be able to help. :)
Tammie - Wife to James for 27 years
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rebeccal2002
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Re: Handwriting--How far to push??

Unread post by rebeccal2002 » Thu Jul 07, 2011 2:22 pm

To be honest, I'm in the same boat as you - a 7 year old boy, who, when he tries, can write very neatly, but usually it's like a chicken scratching. He's a righty.

I usually encourage him to make sure other people can read it too and if it's just WAY too messy, I have him do certain parts over again. He hates that, so he tries to get it readable the 1st time. :) My ds has trouble with spacing, so I focus on that (like grouping letters in the same word together, leaving the proper amount of space between words).

As his coordination improves, I'm sure he handwriting will also.

Rebecca
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Dusenkids
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Re: Handwriting--How far to push??

Unread post by Dusenkids » Thu Jul 07, 2011 4:11 pm

When I was teaching, I aimed for neatness. I wanted their letters to sit on the bottom line. I wanted to see capitals taller than the lower case. I knew my kids would be using notebook paper the following year. If it sat on the bottom line, it was proportional, and I could read it easily, I was happy. Other teachers were much more “strict” but their students hated writing. You need to find that balance for your ds. My biggest pet peeve was spacing between letters and words. Don’t squish it so I can’t read it. Don’t stretch it to make it look like you wrote a whole page. I wanted a good story, not a long, rambling one.

I have used HWT and can be great or a headache depending on the kid. Our K teachers only used it 2 years b/c of that. HWT starts with boxes that the child writes their letters in and blank pages. Some kids like the open space. No lines to worry about. Others need the lines for guidance. They feel lost on a blank page and their writing goes everywhere.

Left-handed…I have a son who can’t make up his mind (2y). I would remind him that he is covering his writing. You might try to show him how important it is to be able to reread his work as he is writing. You can’t reread with your hand in the way. You might also point out smudges that are created when his hand is on his work, especially with a pencil or slow drying pen. But, if it is comfortable for him, it doesn’t interfere with the quality of his work, and it is legible, I wouldn’t worry about it too much yet. Teach a 3-min "mini-lesson" to point something out as you see it and keep going. As his write improves, his writing grip/style will also improve. He will discover faster ways of forming his letters that will work for him. And it may change again as you teach cursive later. HTH
Martie
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Julie in MN
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Re: Handwriting--How far to push??

Unread post by Julie in MN » Thu Jul 07, 2011 5:43 pm

I might accept what he does with praise, and maybe have one issue at a time to work on. I often call it an "extra challenge" -- "Here's your extra challenge: See if you can get them all sitting on the line next time!" :)

This is from a mom who is very lax but a tutor who has to make the parents happy ;)
Julie
P.S. There are a variety of helpful tips on teaching lefties in the archives:
http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php?f=19&t=3379
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
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erin.kate
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Re: Handwriting--How far to push??

Unread post by erin.kate » Fri Jul 08, 2011 9:21 am

When I taught my eldest to write, and she's a girl so that may make some difference, I sat with her and verbally instructed her on every single stroke, every single time. It was tedious but two years later, her hw is beautiful and she is very aware of the lines and shape to the letters, such as how round to make a's and p's, etc. The teacher evaluating her state portfolio this year actually questioned whether Mae actually wrote the copywork herself ... 8[] .

My second daughter is severely dysgraphic and writes in perfect mirror image and still tries to read from right to left. I have been teaching her the same way I did with Mae and with excellent results, and this was after abandoning my first method for HWT for a time. But, we needed the three lines and less stuff on the page and more writing practice so we went back to our traditional way of learning penmanship.

I have lots of samples of Mae's copywork from first grade on our blog.

I never try to make penmanship drudgery, but in truth, I expect a lot, but for no more than 5 min a day in K and 10 in first. But, every day. And, we worked on a letter until it was her very best and I felt confident that she had learned the proper strokes and formation to move on to the next similar letter without passing along bad habits of writing to the next letter. ;) And, in first grade, for instance, if she wrote a word in her reading wb and it looked rushed, she redid it. Every time. I think I sound mean. %|

It's probably not the most fun part of the day, but it's not bad either. And, now when people complement Mae's handwriting ... like in Sunday School ... she lights up and she can feel the fruit of her efforts in her soul stemming from someone other than from me. That in and of itself is a beautiful life lesson.

All children learn differently, of course, and this is simply my experience, but my girls are vastly different and yet their penmanship is yielding similar results with the systematic way we do it daily. Best to you!
♥Count it all joy ~
Mae 11, Viola 9, Jude 7, & Jack 6
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gratitude
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Re: Handwriting--How far to push??

Unread post by gratitude » Fri Jul 08, 2011 10:51 am

carissa wrote:Oh, I should mention that he's a lefty. And specifically about that, how important is it that he put his hand below his writing so that he's not covering up what he's just written? I know that's recommended, and I remind him, but he naturally covers his previous writing. His wrist is not curled or cramped in a weird way. Do I let it go, or require him to write from below? If I should keep on him about this, should I let the issue of aiming for the lines issue go for a while so I'm not harping on two areas?
Carissa,
Mine is a lefty too, age 7, and had the same issue of fast handwriting that landed somewhere between the grass and the sky. In January I started the Italic handwriting program at the K level to try and improve penmanship. By going through a K book, now that he knows how to write, and using the left hand with his hand below his writing and going slowly through each letter his handwriting improved ten-fold. Now I only receive small complaints when the words are very long and 3 or 4 syllables. Just another idea...
erin.kate wrote:When I taught my eldest to write, and she's a girl so that may make some difference, I sat with her and verbally instructed her on every single stroke, every single time.
Erin Kate,
Her penmanship is beautiful! Your blog last winter was my inspiration to pull my 7 year old boy/left-handed boy's handwriting together. I saw your dd beautiful penmanship, and thought so they can do it! So we did exactly what you are talking about above. We are working through the Italic books, they have lines, and doing one letter at a time while I watch and instruct every single stroke. I then do a sample, with the strokes, for note booking and go through the same procedure. I have been doing this with both boys, and the quality of their notebooks is swiftly rising to handwriting that I can feel good about. It has been so worth it for me to go through this process. :-)
erin.kate wrote:Carin, That warms my heart. Thank you! And, I am so happy to hear that you are seeing progress with your boys' penmanship. It's something so evident that they can see and be pleased with, too. Like you, I do the exercises right along with my girls so it's a team effort, and my penmanship is improving too! ;)
My penmanship is improving too, as well! :-) It needs it. ;)

carissa
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Re: Handwriting--How far to push??

Unread post by carissa » Fri Jul 08, 2011 2:32 pm

Wow, thanks everyone for the great suggestions. Now, to decide whether to encourage him to work on one area at a time (e.g., fitting letters between the lines, getting his hand below his writing, etc.) or whether to sit with him and work stroke by stroke. Hmmm....must pray for wisdom.
Carissa in Michigan
Wife to Steve for 21 years.
Mom to ds Brendan (10), ds Caden (8) and dd Sydney (8).
We've done MFW-K, ADV, public school for 2 years, and now considering ECC :)

gratitude
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Re: Handwriting--How far to push??

Unread post by gratitude » Fri Jul 08, 2011 9:35 pm

carissa wrote:Carin, how did you decide on the Italics style? I took a look at Getty-Dubay this morning, and I like that the transition from print to cursive looks minimal compared to moving from ball-and-stick printing to loopy cursive. That is very appealing. If we were to overhaul his printing in 2nd grade and then switch to loopy cursive in 3rd...well, that just sounds overwhelming! %|

Do you feel that you were given adequate information for instructing lefties in the Italics teacher's manual? HWT script was styled to be simple for all kids to construct, including lefties, but I couldn't find a lot of specialized information about how to teach my leftie to write.
I initially used A Reason for Handwriting K book for both of my boys. It has a very traditional approach to handwriting and later cursive. It worked O.K. for my second son, but my first son learned how to write letters quickly rather than neatly. I think part of it was just the fact it had more lines to do for each lesson, so he would try and rush through it. Less really is more sometimes.

So last winter, after seeing Erin Kate's very inspiring blog, I decided to give the handwriting a try again. I wanted to come at it with the idea if they only wrote one line neatly it was better than doing 4 - 5 lines quickly and sloppy. So I looked at Handwriting without Tears (I had heard so many say they loved it) and Getty-Duby Italic. I looked at the sample TM pages on-line and the samples of handwriting. The HWT TM left me feeling over-loaded. I also didn't really like the look of the letters in the samples (this of course is a personal preference). For the Getty-Duby Italic I at first was hesitant since it didn't use loops for cursive. It grew on me the more I looked at it. I really liked, and still like, the idea of going from printing to cursive with a small leap rather than a big jump. The pages looked doable, and for us they are. Hooray! Then I read some stories from people who learned to write with it, and moms who had used it; I liked the fact that adults talked about the compliments they received on their handwriting so I thought we would give it a try. They require about a 1/3 of amount of writing for each lesson, compared to Reasons for Handwriting, and that helped a lot. So I guess that is a very long answer to why we choose it, and it has helped me.

What has helped me more though is sitting and watching them do every single letter to make sure it is being done correctly. The modern style though has really grown on me, and makes a lot of sense to me in a 'type printed' world. I like the look of it, and how easy it is to read a lot. The best thing though, for whatever reason, the stroke instructions on each page really click and make sense to my boys. The strokes are done a little differently than regular printing, and for them it has worked beautifully. The best part for me is that my oldest no longer hates handwriting! :-)

My oldest is starting 2nd this year too. When I first started re-doing his handwriting a few months ago I wrote everything except for handwriting practice in the K Italic book. Science, math, LA, note booking, everything. At this point I am having him do his hand writing practice and own note booking. I am planning on adding back in math. I will probably add in science last. I have him dictate the assignments he isn't writing. I want him though to really learn how to write, and if it is a lot of writing he ends up going too fast and not doing well with it. So I am trying to work him up to a 2nd grade level of hand writing amount.

Oh, for the fact he is left handed I haven't read much on certain techniques for it. I think the only thing helpful I have ever read is having them tilt the page towards the right instead of towards the left, and then holding the hand and pencil the way a right handed person would but with a different page tilt.

I hope this helps. :-)
Blessings,
Last edited by gratitude on Sat Jul 09, 2011 10:57 am, edited 1 time in total.

erin.kate
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Re: Handwriting--How far to push??

Unread post by erin.kate » Sat Jul 09, 2011 8:58 am

carissa wrote: Erin-Kate, if you had to remediate a student rather than starting from the beginning, would you be on them all day long to do their very best writing for every word in every subject? Now that he's going to be in 2nd grade, there will be more substantial writing in a variety of subject areas, from spelling to science experiments. Maybe I should set the new standard and minimize the amount of writing he does each day, gradually increasing it as his handwriting improves?
I would second what Carin said here
gratitude wrote:My oldest is starting 2nd this year too. When I first started re-doing his handwriting a few months ago I wrote everything except for handwriting practice in the K Italic book. Science, math, LA, note booking, everything. At this point I am having him do his hand writing practice and own note booking. I am planning on adding back in math. I will probably add in science last. I have him dictate the assignments he isn't writing. I want him though to really learn how to write, and if it is a lot of writing he ends up going too fast and not doing well with it. So I am trying to work him up to a 2nd grade level of hand writing amount.
... if you are remediating handwriting, then only give as much handwriting as the child can do well and purposefully. I would do more oral dictation and use written narration, say in the student sheets, as an opportunity to instruct in the handwriting. I would expect every letter to be his best, even if it takes some time, and like I said before, I would only have him write for ten minutes per day. At this age there are other ways to encourage learning, without a lot of writing.

We were quite unconventional and used a penmanship program that was Catholic but also had daily short and intentional lessons. Each letter was clearly scripted for me and the amount of practice was absolutely realistic. It has been a dream for us. This year we are attempting to use Queen penmanship, only because I have all of the verbal instruction memorized so we are able to move onto something with more beauty. I love the look of italic, and I've tossed it around in my mind, but I worry that I'd have to teach myself first and then my kids and I'm not that good. ;)
♥Count it all joy ~
Mae 11, Viola 9, Jude 7, & Jack 6
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2009: MFW K♥

carissa
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Re: Handwriting--How far to push??

Unread post by carissa » Sat Jul 09, 2011 3:11 pm

Thanks so much! You all have been so helpful in sharing what has worked for you, how you've addressed problem issues, and ways to help a leftie. I love this board! :)
Carissa in Michigan
Wife to Steve for 21 years.
Mom to ds Brendan (10), ds Caden (8) and dd Sydney (8).
We've done MFW-K, ADV, public school for 2 years, and now considering ECC :)

RachelT
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Re: Handwriting--How far to push??

Unread post by RachelT » Sun Jul 10, 2011 4:03 pm

My son is dyslexic/dysgraphic and has needed the help of Handwriting Without Tears. I used HWT in K and then when we went to the MFW 1st materials he was frustrated with the regular 3 lines, so I went back to HWT after that.
carissa wrote:Do you feel that you were given adequate information for instructing lefties in the Italics teacher's manual? HWT script was styled to be simple for all kids to construct, including lefties, but I couldn't find a lot of specialized information about how to teach my leftie to write.
The double lines without a line at the top are easier to use and there is lots of practice in each book. It is supposed to work very well for lefties and there are some tips about that in the TM. The letters are supposed to be easy to form from right or left. The TM's are very helpful for handwriting in general with lots of details, but I would by no means call them "atrocious". I think it's a great program and it has also worked well for my other child who is always ahead of her age in fine motor skills. She is now writing beautifully in print or cursive.
carissa wrote:Erin-Kate, if you had to remediate a student rather than starting from the beginning, would you be on them all day long to do their very best writing for every word in every subject? Now that he's going to be in 2nd grade, there will be more substantial writing in a variety of subject areas, from spelling to science experiments. Maybe I should set the new standard and minimize the amount of writing he does each day, gradually increasing it as his handwriting improves?
In remediating any subject, you just focus on teaching that skill once a day and then just encourage the use of it at other times throughout the day. I only teach handwriting specifics during handwriting / copywork, but then if someone forgets how to write something at another point in the day, we review. Because of my son's dysgraphia (writing disability), he had to copy everything longer before he could remember how to form the letters. For instance, both of my children have worked on cursive for a year and he still has to copy each cursive letter, but my daughter only forgets a letter occasionally. He had to copy everything for a long time until somewhere in 3rd grade) and can now dictate phrases and short sentences without having to copy them from a whiteboard, but I have also had him learn to type because he can do it more efficiently. I require him to hand write for copywork/handwriting, but I allow him to type most other assignments unless it's just a few words at a time. I am not saying that your son has any of the same issues, but that is how remediation and modification work at our house.

carissa wrote:Thanks for the insight into how you remediate handwriting, Rachel. That's helpful. The HWT teachers manuals weren't as user-friendly as I was expecting. I guess I thought they would correspond more to the particular student workbook pages, with instruction and tips for the teacher aligning with what the students were doing in their workbooks. Overall, HWT worked well to help my son learn how to form each letter. He just doesn't have much control in his writing yet. Thanks again, and please forgive me for my poor word choice. &)
The HWT materials did undergo a revision a year or two ago. I have found them to have the research and more general handwriting, but also a page that corresponds to each studens page. Maybe you can look at a sample online and see if you want to try it again or maybe something else will work better for your family. No worries about your word choice! No one curriculum works for every family! :-) Have a good week!
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jasntas
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Re: Handwriting--How far to push??

Unread post by jasntas » Sun Jul 10, 2011 9:01 pm

I just thought I'd mention that HWT started a new online program to go along with their books. It's called Digital Teaching Tools. It shows the proper way to form the letters in print and cursive. There is a yearly fee of about $20.00 but you can currently view a sample of the program and you could also sign up for a 2 week free trial as well. :)
Tammie - Wife to James for 27 years
Mom to Justin (15) and Carissa (12)
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schelean
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Re: Handwriting--How far to push??

Unread post by schelean » Mon Jul 11, 2011 7:16 am

When my dd10 was learning to write a few years ago we started with the K paper with sky, fence, grass. After she learned letter formation I realized she didn't do well writing that large. She did much better on regular notebook paper. We were all much happier on notebook paper. Just a suggestion...
Also, I am left-handed. I slant the top of my paper to the right with my hand below the line. I can see what I am writing easily. I have the same form as right handed people just backwards. My writing does slant the opposite direction as right-handed people. I didn't really know that until I wrote on the same page as another person. I guess I don't think of teaching lefties as any different than teaching righties. I have one of each with my children. Just my experience...
Schelean in Texas
MFW user since 2006
Exp-1850 w/dd 11& K w/ds 6

TriciaMR
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Poor Handwriting...Perfectionist

Unread post by TriciaMR » Mon Nov 28, 2011 5:10 pm

melissamomof3girls wrote:My 8 yodd has very poor handwriting. I don't think it's because she can't...it's because she won't try harder? She is also learning cursive and really enjoys that. However, she does not like handwriting her scriptures or anything from PLL. I try to keep her handwriting to a minimum because of that and explain the importance of good penmanship. But to an 8 year-old, well, she doesn't get why it's important :~

Also, I think part of the problem is she's a perfectionist like her daddy and if she already thinks she can't do it perfect, she doesn't really try. She CANNOT stand for me to correct her. I try to remind her a teacher in a formal school setting would use a red pen to mark things.

Any ideas?
Let her learn to type? Seriously... Ummm, at 8, not all kids can write neatly.

Cut it back... Say, "I want 3 very neat words." Then the next day 3 more. Etc. So she doesn't finish the whole thing in a week, at least you got some neat words.

My other thought would be to get StartWrite software and type up the verses and let her trace them. For some kids, it is hard to remember how to form the letters...

-Trish
Trish - Wife to Phil, Mom to Toni(18), Charlie(14), and Trent(14)
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2017-2018 - DE, 1850MOD
2018-2019 - College, AHL
My blog

Buttercup78
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Re: Poor Handwriting...Perfectionist

Unread post by Buttercup78 » Mon Nov 28, 2011 7:09 pm

I don't know anything about that software, but I make tracing pages for my 8yo recluctant writer also. I use a font called "Penmanship Print" that I downloaded for free online. If you find it and download, just know that to make a 'space' you use the ` key (the key to the left of the number 1 on your keyboard) instead of the spacebar to keep the lines going.
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Julie in MN
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Re: Poor Handwriting...Perfectionist

Unread post by Julie in MN » Tue Nov 29, 2011 2:51 pm

saralynn wrote:I am having the same difficulty with my 8 year old son. He has a "special" way that he likes to make several letters, and that makes it takes him much longer to write everything. Should I make him write letters properly? Although, he did in the beginning, he has used his own "creative" letters for a while, and I am not sure that he remembers the correct way.
I had trouble with my youngest wanting to do things his own way, too. My older two were more rule-followers :~ ;)

I used Handwriting Without Tears for cursive with youngest, and it "forced" him to start the first large group of letters with a "magic C." In other words, he had to start an a, d, g, etc., by first writing a "c" -- and I mean a nice, fat, round c -- and then he could finish the letter. This helped us tremendously at our house, sigh...

I do think many adults write letters in their own way, but to me the reason behind the letter formation is to help your reader. No use writing if no one can read it! My youngest's "own way" was not legible and therefore I could not let it go on. Your child might be better at his creative methods.

Julie
P.S. Here's a perfectionist thread for ya: http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php ... 352#p15352
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

TriciaMR
Posts: 998
Joined: Thu Sep 20, 2007 11:43 am

Re: Poor Handwriting...Perfectionist

Unread post by TriciaMR » Tue Nov 29, 2011 3:23 pm

My rule is, for "handwriting time" (like when we use the Handwriting without Tears book, or those first 3-4 weeks of the school year where MFW has us practicing the letters), they must write the letters the "correct" way. For other times, especially if I'm not there to oversee, then they can do it however they want, but they need to do it neatly/legibly. So, if it is copying a verse and you are considering that "handwriting time," then I would insist they write correctly, but give them more time than one day to get it done. But, if it something else, like maybe copywork from English, then I might not insist so much.

I also do insist they form their letters correctly during spelling time, but having two dyslexic kids, I feel that it is very important to do so especially when they reverse b/d a lot. I did make an alphabet strip that shows how to form each letter and put it at the top of the table we use for spelling so they can always look at it whenever they need to.

-Trish
Trish - Wife to Phil, Mom to Toni(18), Charlie(14), and Trent(14)
2014-2015 - AHL, CTG
2015-2016 - WHL, RTR
2016-2017 - EXP1850, US1877
2017-2018 - DE, 1850MOD
2018-2019 - College, AHL
My blog

melissamomof3girls
Posts: 11
Joined: Wed Nov 28, 2007 2:47 pm
Location: Michigan

Re: Poor Handwriting...Perfectionist

Unread post by melissamomof3girls » Tue Nov 29, 2011 9:50 pm

Thank you for the replies.

Today was actually a better day! She seemed to really have listened to what I said yesterday and tried hard today! (although daddy was working home and sitting close by) lol

I will try the tracing sometime though! And I will look into those things you suggested.

Also, Julie, thank you for the link! I am going to read that tomorrow!
Melissa
DD1 ~14
DD2 ~ 12
DD3 ~ 10
DS1 ~ 7
DD4 ~ 3

Looking forward to Exp to 1850 this fall :)

saralynn
Posts: 5
Joined: Sat Oct 25, 2008 7:55 pm

Re: Poor Handwriting...Perfectionist

Unread post by saralynn » Wed Nov 30, 2011 7:14 am

Thank you Trish and Julie. I like your ideas. Time for creativity and writing properly seems like the best fit for us.
Blessings,
Sara

MelissaB
Posts: 368
Joined: Sun May 09, 2010 10:01 pm

Struggling with neatness

Unread post by MelissaB » Sat Mar 16, 2013 9:57 pm

Jamie wrote:It seems like neatness with our handwriting is a bit of a struggle in our home. I have a hard time getting our 13 yo son to write cursive, my 11 yo daughter uses it (but could work on neatness), and our 9 yo daughter is just learning it this year. I started having them write down character quality definitions and the corresponding verses in cursive this past week. Would it be mean to have them redo their work if I know that it can be done better? What do some of you other families do? I desire for the kids' work to be done neatly and not to get it finished "just to be done." How do you encourage neatness both in their writing and in their overall work? Thanks for your ideas!
Hi, Jamie.

We use this verse a lot: "Whatever your hand finds to do, do it with all thy might..." Ecclesiastes 9:10.

At the same time, I can't help but ask myself, how many of us write very neatly all of the time? Comparing my signature on a hastily written check at the grocery store to my signature on a thank you note or other card... It's very different. :)

So, here's what I've concluded - and I hope this is helpful, but is not by any means the standards I think all homeschoolers must aspire to. :-) :

1. When our children are doing handwriting (the first-day memory verse w/ My Father's World), I encourage them to do their very best.

2. For the rest of their schoolwork, legibility is the requirement. If I can't read it, they have to re-write the words/numbers that are illegible. It doesn't have to be as pretty or perfect - but it must be legible and orderly. (I use 1 Cor. 14:40.)

Looking forward to reading how other Moms handle handwriting... Thanks for bringing up this topic.
Melissa B. (Arkansas)
Girls ages 16 & 13
Completed K, 1st, and Investigate {ECC; CTG; RTR; Expl.-1850; and 1850-Mod. Times}
"That they may teach the young women to be sober, to love their husbands, to love their children,.." Titus 2:4

Jamie
Posts: 22
Joined: Sun Dec 14, 2008 10:04 am
Location: Montana

Re: Struggling with neatness

Unread post by Jamie » Sat Mar 16, 2013 11:05 pm

Thanks for responding, Melissa. I appreciate you sharing those verses also. You mentioned that you encourage your children to do their very best for the handwriting portion of their school. Have you ever had a day when you could tell that it could be better? If so, what did you do? Did you have them redo their verse?
Jamie
Married to my sweetie for 16.5 years
14 ds, 12 dd, 10 dd, 7 ds, 4 ds, 1.5 dd
MFW K, ECC, CtG, RtR, Ex to 1850, & 14 yo currently in 1850 to Modern

yvonneh
Posts: 18
Joined: Mon Feb 25, 2013 4:54 pm

Re: Struggling with neatness

Unread post by yvonneh » Sun Mar 17, 2013 8:37 am

Just a thought that if you implement a "rule" that if you know it's not their best handwriting, they have to re-do it, that might "inspire" them to try their best the first time to avoid the re-writes.
Yvonne
wife to Pete since 2002
born again believer since 2005
mom to 3 dd:
--elizabeth, 9
--abigail, 6
--faith, 3
ECC 2013-2014
Learning God's Story (1st) 2013-2014

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