Co-ops - MFW ideas

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HSmommi2mine
Posts: 159
Joined: Mon Oct 23, 2006 5:59 pm

Co-ops - MFW ideas

Unread post by HSmommi2mine » Sun Mar 20, 2011 9:48 am

If you happen to be in Oregon, we are starting a MFW-ish co-op ! ;) First meeting tonight! :-)
Pylegang wrote:Oh . . . How I'd love to do a MFW type co-op! That sounds wonderful. I hope your first meeting was fabulous!! Just curious . . . what kind of things are you guys planning?
HIgh School will be using AHL and USHL- 1877. I am in charge of High School mostly and I love MFW. Also, it suits a co=op situation really well because the program is primarily independent and then the students meet for discussion once a week. The only thing I wish MFW had, was some kind of parent guide that would help us walk through discussions of the material with the kids. I am basically going to write something like this using the ideas from the message board and cliff-notes and the like, but the co-op is growing faster than I will be able to do it on my own. At first I figured that we would add one program a year, I would teach the class and write a discussion guide the first year we offered it; but it there are enough older kids who need US history that it looks like we will be offering two programs this year. I hope I find someone brave enough to go in w/o a specific discussion guide!
~Christina

Wife to my favorite guy
Mom to 3 great kids

Julie in MN
Posts: 2929
Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 3:44 pm
Location: Minnesota

Re: Co-ops

Unread post by Julie in MN » Sun Mar 20, 2011 11:14 am

Christina,
Your group sounds so wonderful for the kids. My ds would love it!
HSmommi2mine wrote: I am basically going to write something like this using the ideas from the message board and cliff-notes and the like, but the co-op is growing faster than I will be able to do it on my own.
I just wanted to add that I have no trouble finding things to talk about in AHL -- my son would probably say I need to do less not more :) But I thought I'd jot down a few things that help me, off the top of my head. Note that I taught a high schooler in the past, so I had lots of things sitting on shelves just waiting to be used :~

1. Bible - The OT Challenge includes some questions worthy of discussion. We also use the Greenleaf Guide to the OT, which is very basic questions but it's surprising how many times my ds misses something basic ;) ; plus, there are some little connections between chapters in there that we enjoy (e.g. remember Edom is the descendant of Esau). Also, the little "section titles" in the Bible itself are very helpful to just use as topics/questions -- who was the widow, etc.; especially for kids using an audio Bible -- they aren't hearing those section headings, so bringing up those section titles can help them organize what they have heard. And then there are some general OT topics that would be good for discussion, which you can often find in an intro to each book in your Bible -- what can we get out of reading the Law, how do we look at all the battles, etc. The photos in Victor's Journey are also good, although small so you might want to use them as a springboard to find other photos or larger maps to discuss. Lots of Biblical mapping could be visualized, including various journeys to other lands and the divisions of the 12 tribes. I also like the videos from That The World May Know (also called Faith Lessons). The Kings & Prophets one applies, and it's available thru Netflix delivery.

2. For the New Answers Book, there is a video from AIG that goes along with maybe a dozen of the chapters. The videos are very short but cover the topics and show the actual authors (a good reminder that many adults believe in creation). If you sign up for AIG's emails, sometimes you get a free or inexpensive download of videos like these, plus other good ones.

3. The Pharaohs book includes a video. I found it helpful to watch the first segment "after" we had read most of the book (I tried watching it last summer *before* we started & was confused, but maybe that's just me?); it was a great review with cool visuals. I haven't watched the other segments yet.

4. For Gilgamesh and Bulfinch, the Literature Supplement has good discussion questions at the end of some sections. You could also use class time to discuss the finer points of the stories which some students (like my son) may have missed; those will also be in the Literature Supplement.

5. For the Iliad & Odyssey, I find SparkNotes summaries to be very clear and concise. My used bookstore has a filing cabinet with most of these. I use the sections on analysis and theme, more than the chapter summaries. I also like the videos from The Teaching Company by Elizabeth Vandiver; my library has these, although they never have the guidebooks with outlines, but TTC has sales around Christmas/New Years for like $20-25 & free shipping. ETA: In the guide, Marie gives some commentary, asks questions, and has the students write brief summaries -- all of these can be discussed. We also watched the old Hallmark movie of the Odyssey (after the essay was written, so he didn't get confused).

6. For the encyclopedia, I just look at the title in the MFW grid and ask my son, what did you learn about X topic today? I think it helps him retain if he at least says something out loud. If he didn't come up with anything, I'd open up to the pages, see which illustration caught my eye, and if he had forgotten everything then I'd read the little blurb out loud until something came to his mind ;) For Notgrass, there are some good discussion questions in the Bible section at the end of most chapters, as well as the quiz book. Kids are already answering questions on Notgrass, but you could check for simple yes or no type answers and discuss further.

7. For Purpose Drive Life, I did something similar to the encyclopedia, and just looked at the lesson titles in the MFW grid. Those titles alone gave me plenty to ask/talk about :)

8. Once in a while you might want to check on grammar. There's a grammar question at the end of most Notgrass chapters which could be discussed further (my son tends to breeze thru it). There are good grammar lessons in the literature supplement. You could do a daily example on a marker board to be sure all the students got it.

9. It would be fun to do something with the essays together, although that would be a lot to think through in my crowded brain :) The Psalms and Proverbs projects might also be fun areas to do something together, especially since that section of the year is a little more free-wheeling. You could work with decorating their project covers even, or acting proverbs out (or even acting out fables to help get kids going on their projects)? I'd say the first 12 weeks of AHL are more structured essays, the next 12 weeks are more creative writing, and I haven't done the last (3rd) 12 weeks yet :)

10. The timeline book could use some discussion and review, I think. My kid tends to worry about placement and not get into the correlation between time periods and such. "Hey, look what was happening at the same time!" Mapping I'm not sure what to discuss, unless it would be any difficulties a particular student had?

11. For Eric Liddell, you might watch Chariots of Fire? It's been many years since I saw that film, but I think it was appropriate?

See why my son thinks I need FEWER ideas?!
Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

Nayfiesmama
Posts: 2
Joined: Sat Apr 02, 2011 10:07 pm
Location: Oregon

Highschool Co-op

Unread post by Nayfiesmama » Thu Apr 07, 2011 10:23 am

Hi There, I'm in the Salem, OR area and we're starting a co-op for this coming year. We'll have classes for ages 3-18, and the Highschool classes will be using MFW for their core. I'd love to hear if any of you are planning to use the curriculum in a co-op environment. Perhaps I could learn things from how you're setting up your co-op...etc.

If anyone would like to chat back and forth throughout the year, as the weeks move on... I'd love to have you let me know.
Thanks!
Carrie
erin.kate wrote:Oh how I wish we had a MFW co-op here in Upper New England. What a joy! Best to you!
Perhaps it would be ok to use this thread as a spot for those who would like a co-op, but don't have one yet. It really only takes 3-6 students who are doing the same studies. Add in a science, and .... wow... it's amazing :)
Carrie :) Hobbies include putting together a co-op for Salem, OR (Using MFW for the Highschool)

HSmommi2mine
Posts: 159
Joined: Mon Oct 23, 2006 5:59 pm

Re: Highschool Co-op

Unread post by HSmommi2mine » Fri Apr 08, 2011 4:02 pm

Julie in MN wrote:Probably nothing on high school, but some general MFW co-op ideas may be found here:
http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=3723
Julie, thank you for that link I read through the whole thing. Carrie and I are setting up the co-op together, along with another friend. It woudl be amazing to start with 40 families that are already using MFW! In this area MFW isn't as well known, so we are having to do a lot of explaining and answering of questions. I am really glad we are able to do it though, because MFW is a great program and I think the families will really like it. The High School years just work so perfectly in a co-op and I can't wait to start.
~Christina

Wife to my favorite guy
Mom to 3 great kids

Julie in MN
Posts: 2929
Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 3:44 pm
Location: Minnesota

Re: Highschool Co-op

Unread post by Julie in MN » Fri Apr 08, 2011 11:35 pm

Carrie,
I forgot about a big MFW co-op that has high schoolers in it. Maybe it will have something to help you along. I think you can locate it by doing a google search for MFW Explorers. They not only cover a huge range of MFW years, but they pour a lot into reaching out to help MFW users via their web pages.

It's nothing "official" of course.
Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

cbollin

Has anybody has ever used The Fallacy Detective in a classro

Unread post by cbollin » Tue May 08, 2012 1:57 pm

Ophoven wrote:Was wondering if anybody has ever used The Fallacy Detective in a classroom setting? I am looking to get some apologetics and learn how to persuade and confront the ignorance of today's mindsets and politics with a co-op group of Junior and Senior High Students (ages 13-18). We only meet 2x a month, but I'd love to hear what others have done with this book. Any thoughts and suggestions would be so appreciated!

Thanks,
Tracy in MN
tophoven@charter.net
Tracy,

While waiting for experiences over here... check out this article on the website of the authors of FD.
http://www.fallacydetective.com/article ... -classroom

other options for older students could be the worldview materials in MFW's year 3 of high school...

-crystal

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