US1 & US2 - English/Grammar/Writing

TriciaMR
Posts: 998
Joined: Thu Sep 20, 2007 11:43 am

Re: Literature in U.S History 1877 to Present?

Unread post by TriciaMR » Fri Jan 23, 2015 12:41 pm

Just wanted to add, go to http://www.mfwbooks.com/products/18/U-S ... /#Overview and open up the "Read More" section (the tiny blue "read more" right at the bottom before "samples, then scroll down a ways and look for this info (in addition to the summary Julie gave):

The reading list includes choices of classics about U.S. culture for worldview analysis, such as:
The Call of the Wild – by Jack London
Buck, a dog taken from a peaceful home, encounters brutal life as a sled dog in Alaska. Portrays social Darwinism in fiction. (Another option is White Fang, a lengthier novel by Jack London, with even more overt social Darwinism.)

The Great Gatsby – by F. Scott Fitzgerald
A commentary on life in the 1920s, wealth, and the emptiness in the American dream.

1984 – by George Orwell
A powerful, frightening look at a future in which truth is whatever the Party decides to be truth. This is an example of a "negative utopia" book, in which man has no personal freedom or individuality. Some parents may want to preview for content (language, an affair), but we would generally recommend this book because of its powerful message.

The list also includes choices of biographies to challenge and inspire, such as:
Joni – by Joni Eareckson Tada
Joni, totally paralyzed from a swimming accident, recounts her spiritual journey from anger to joy in this autobiography.

Born Again – by Charles W. Colson
Autobiography of President Nixon's former special counsel who pled guilty to Watergate-related offenses. A remarkable story of God's mercy to call Mr. Colson to Himself and to a new life with purpose.
Trish - Wife to Phil, Mom to Toni(18), Charlie(14), and Trent(14)
2014-2015 - AHL, CTG
2015-2016 - WHL, RTR
2016-2017 - EXP1850, US1877
2017-2018 - DE, 1850MOD
2018-2019 - College, AHL
My blog

TriciaMR
Posts: 998
Joined: Thu Sep 20, 2007 11:43 am

High school Literature supplements

Unread post by TriciaMR » Tue Jan 12, 2016 10:06 pm

annaz wrote:
Sat Jan 09, 2016 7:28 pm
What do these contain exactly, both the one for AHL and WHL? Since there's no sample, I'm trying to figure out what is in them!
Hi Anna,

In AHL it contains the writing assignments for writing the argumentative essay, and then questions and quizzes for some of the literature.

WHL doesn't have a literature supplement - it uses a book called British Literature to cover some of the literature. And then Writers, Inc. to cover writing stuff.

US1 does have a literature supplement. I'm assuming it is similar to AHL (we're in the middle of WHL).
annaz wrote:
Wed Jan 13, 2016 8:27 am
Thanks, Tricia. Are the questions comprehension or literature analysis type?
Well, I'd have to go dig it out of a box. My daughter said it was about 50/50.
Trish - Wife to Phil, Mom to Toni(18), Charlie(14), and Trent(14)
2014-2015 - AHL, CTG
2015-2016 - WHL, RTR
2016-2017 - EXP1850, US1877
2017-2018 - DE, 1850MOD
2018-2019 - College, AHL
My blog

Julie in MN
Posts: 2925
Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 3:44 pm
Location: Minnesota

Re: High school Literature supplements

Unread post by Julie in MN » Wed Jan 13, 2016 11:50 am

Trish already answered well but I thought I'd add a few random things I remember.

The AHL guide is by Smarr and includes part of Smarr's Writing guide, including both argumentative essays and some grammar review that is done in between other things. The rest of the AHL guide is three Smarr literature studies (Gilgamesh, Bulfinch's Mythology, and The Odyssey). Those are kind of like Progeny Press guides, and I felt they leaned towards vocab & comprehension. I don't remember much about literary technique, but there were a few thinking questions. I think that's because the 9th graders are learning to read higher level literature and need to be sure that, first of all, they understand what they're reading. My 9th grader was not so good at that and it was helpful to stop and discuss what he wasn't getting in the literature supplement as he went.

Like Trish said, no supp. in WHL.

The US1 literature supplement is very different. It's by Stobaugh and includes tons of original writings right in the supplement - from political documents to personal journals to prayers. The students do a variety of short assignments after most readings, from answering a question to writing their own journal entry. The guide also has a section on worldviews, which goes along with the worldview study done for Bible credit that year, but Stobaugh uses a different framework, which is kind of good to get kids to see there are different ways of looking at such things, but still keeping in mind that worldview underlies most things.

I also found this old post of mine with some links that might be helpful, and the links still work:
http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php?f=21&t=6776

Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

annaz
Posts: 54
Joined: Fri Mar 24, 2006 7:34 pm

Re: High school Literature supplements

Unread post by annaz » Wed Jan 13, 2016 12:33 pm

Thank you! Very helpful.

Julie in MN
Posts: 2925
Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 3:44 pm
Location: Minnesota

Literature in US History 1877 to Pressent

Unread post by Julie in MN » Sat Jul 16, 2016 12:03 am

donutmom wrote:
Fri Jul 15, 2016 6:54 pm
I am just curious. . . . about how many books does a child read in the high school US History 1877 to Present year for literature?

I know there are recommendations and that you aren't confined to that list, and I realize that there are books of varying lengths, and also that kids read at different speeds. I'm just looking for a "thumb in the wind" general idea of about how many books I can expect my kiddo to read in that semester. We do plan to do a research paper, too. I guess that will make a difference.

Thanks ahead for any insight!
-dee
Hi Dee,
I have no experience, so I hope others chime in. (My son did 12th grade English through dual enrollment.)

However, I wanted to be sure that you noticed in the manual where there is an estimate of time spent on each book. So for instance if you choose the first book, Giants in the Earth, it says that one should take about 3 weeks. Since all of the books on the list range from 1 to 3 weeks, I'd assume most books would be in that range, and you have 10 weeks to work with. I do personally think you could study some of those books over a longer period, if you were having some good discussions, movie comparisons, researching the era, etc., but that's just what happens when I get into something :)

Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

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