Non-USA Questions

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cbollin

Non-USA Questions

Unread post by cbollin » Tue Jun 01, 2010 6:20 am

Foreign Language choice
JenD wrote:Hello all! DS13 is learning a people group language where we live, Senegal. It is called Wolof. He already knows French and we wanted him exposed to the heart language of the Senegalese. We are all taking a class 4hours/week. My question is: can this count as a foreign language even if it isn't a widely known language except for in West Africa? He will be taught by a Senegalese but there will not be a record of his progress per-se. Thank you for any help that will be shared. Blessings! Jennifer
do you mean in terms of high school credit and transcripts?
If you're doing 4 hours/week in a class and then at least trying to speak it for about an hour a week outside of class...... I would put in on transcript or portfolio even if it is all oral. Why should a language have to have text, workbooks, etc.....

definitely on a resume for a job if he continues with it and gains fluency.

Colleges will want to see more standard languages for meeting entrance requirements. But that doesn't mean that you can't count another language or find a way to include it in some fashion.

If your son is not yet high school age, of course it counts.

-crystal

Julie in MN
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Re: Foreign Language choice

Unread post by Julie in MN » Tue Jun 01, 2010 10:29 pm

Jennifer,
How cool that your child is such a child of the world. Think of all the good he can do in the world!

As far as your own requirements for graduation from your own homeschool, you can give it credit if you feel it is worthy. It doesn't sound like there is any question of it being "enough" but only about it being "usual," so I would not hesitate to count it, myself.

As far as fulfilling college expectations so that your child can get into even very competitive colleges, I think many would be delighted to see something as unique as Wolof. I suppose it will depend on the college and even on the individual person you talk to in the college (and in my experience, I suggest you try someone else if the first person says "no"), but I wouldn't rule it out as being a college-preparatory language.

Here is some reading from the college I went to about foreign language study. First is a list of admission requirements, which are very general when it comes to foreign language:
http://admissions.tc.umn.edu/admissioni ... tml#hsprep

Then there's the list for graduation from the college, which gives more specifics. It doesn't mention Wolof, of course, but it does list many unusual languages, from Urdu to Biblical Hebrew.
http://class.umn.edu/degree_requirement ... ement.html

It sounds like passing a well-known test would be key to "testing out" of taking foreign language during college, if that's what you'd like to do. Since there's probably no "LPE" test like the link mentions, I would think you could have an outside evaluator assess Wolof in all the areas -- listening, reading, writing, and speaking. That seems to be the biggest issue -- that someone can confirm your child's level of accomplishment to be equivalent to four credits' worth. You might want to make sure you seek out such an evaluator while you are still in-country and get recommendations in writing while it is still fresh in your teachers' minds.

Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

Julie in MN
Posts: 2925
Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 3:44 pm
Location: Minnesota

Canadian history

Unread post by Julie in MN » Thu Feb 21, 2013 2:10 pm

4myboys wrote:Thanks for clarifying the the content of the last two years of the highschool program. As a Canadian I am not yet sure how I am going to handle the early and late modern history. I will have to do some tailoring to fit our needs. Our boys will need one year of Canadian history and either one year of world history or world geography for grad requirements. Also, in our province high school is 10th to 12th. I've not yet figured out when or how I will keep track of credits because of that.
The 2nd year of high school (WHL) would satisfy the World History requirement. And there is an option that year to also earn 1/4 year credit in geography (the other 1/4 is in US2).

We are in US1 right now. To me, giving just one person's experience, I'd say:
1. History 1/2 credit: It would be fairly easy to choose a Canadian history textbook and sub it out for the history textbook in US1 (and finished in US2). The history textbook and materials are all pretty much self-contained, so easy to switch.
2. Government 1/2 credit, also easy to sub for more of a Canada-focused government text, or use as-is.
3. English: There is an emphasis on American Literature in US1, and that might also need reworking for you. It's lots of original source readings, from early colonists to presidents to explorers, plus a few longer works. It would be easy enough to sub out the longer works (e.g. Of Plymouth Plantation) or to just use them as-is for literature (Scarlet Letter). However, the shorter works, assignments, and worldview topics I don't know enough about how to sub those - some of the people & events are going to be involved in Canadian history but not all. Maybe call the office when you get closer?
4. As for the Bible credit in US1, I don't see any problem using that in Canada. We're still on the first part of the year, using Thinking Like a Christian, but that's a good worldview overview and not America-focused.

Looking ahead to US2, it seems like that would be quite easy to use in Canada.
1. English looks like it focuses on research, general literature, and speech.
2. History 1/2 year credit again is textbook and could be subbed.
3. Economics 1/2 year credit I would think would be similar enough to Canadian economics that Economics in a Box would work?
4. 1/4 credit in geography should work, as it's more world and continent focused.
5. Bible seems to have a world focus.

Hope that helps a bit. Of course, the office would know more!
Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

Julie in MN
Posts: 2925
Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 3:44 pm
Location: Minnesota

Canadian Users of MFW High School Program

Unread post by Julie in MN » Mon Aug 18, 2014 9:47 pm

Erna wrote:I am just wondering if there are any Canadians that have gone beyond the five year cycle and are doing MFW high school. If so, how does it fare for Canada's requirements? Have you found it easy to sub in Canadian content for history and geography? If you've completed high school, how are your kids faring in college or university?
Hi Erna,
I'll keep you company (and bump you up) while you wait for replies.

AHL & WHL
I am not up on Canadian history priorities, but I can't see that AHL or WHL would have much need for adjustment at all, including the 0.25 credit in geography, because really it's world geography. Maybe one map of modern USA near the end of the year would become modern Canada instead, but there isn't really any "teaching" that would need to be changed there. Maybe sub in a piece of literature in WHL to make sure you include a Canadian author in world literature, or just wait and do that next year?

US1 & US2
In US1 and US2, of course the history is going to need to be subbed, but it is pretty self-contained so it seems like it would be easy enough to sub in your own Canadian/Modern history high school course (do 1 semester each year).

Also, the literature in US1 would probably be subbed for Canadian literature and Canadian founding documents and such. However, you might want to have the American Lit Supplement on hand because very early American history has a lot of crossover with early Canada, and MFW does some worldview work in there, so it might be of interest, not sure. And if you want to brush up on grammar, that book can be used as-is.

All the US2 literature 0.5 credit could be done as-is.

For the US2 0.5 speech credit, you might want to search out a few famous Canadian speeches to mix in. Some USA speeches are added to US1 history and then there is the speech credit, which again we didn't do at our house because ds did Communication at the college, but it may have more USA speeches than Canadian in there :)

The Bible of course could be done as-is in both US1 and US2.

The extra 0.25 (or more, optional) geography in US2 focuses a lot on Operation World and does not seem USA-centric to me.

The government in US1 would need to be adapted. There are 2 parts, Never Before in History which focuses on the Biblical foundation of the US Constitution, and it is very evidence-based going back to well before the US was formed, which I love but not sure how much interest there would be up north of Minnesota?! Then there's the local government book which adds a lot of projects that involve researching local government requirements for different things which might be good ideas to assign in any country, but not sure whether you have something more specifically Canadian available?

The economics in US2 might be fine, depending on how much Canada distinguishes itself from the USA in that department, not sure. Economics in a Box is mostly a conservative Christian focus.

Hope all of that makes sense! Even when I was subbing things out because of college courses and other reasons, I felt having the MFW high school guide on hand was always useful to me -- gave me options, helped me prioritize, helped me see how much was usually done in a day.

Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

Julie in MN
Posts: 2925
Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 3:44 pm
Location: Minnesota

WHL - Living Overseas - Research Paper

Unread post by Julie in MN » Tue May 31, 2016 12:11 am

Mom-n-Zam wrote:
Mon May 30, 2016 3:11 am
We have used MFW in the elementary years but this is our first year of MFW High School (10th grade). We are missionaries, living in Zambia and there are no public libraries available for us to use. Is it possible to do the WHL Research Paper with only online sources? If so - please, please advise on the best way to do this....? TIA!
You know, when my youngest was doing the WHL research paper, I had him go into the library and meet with a librarian about finding resources for his paper, and you know what she did? She brought him to a computer and showed him online resources. That was it - no books !! He did tell her, "Um, I think my mom's gonna want me to come out with a book in my hand." LOL, he was right.

So, yes, it's possible to do a research paper with only online resources, at least according to our librarian.

I like books and I think colleges like books. That said, I think a lot of research is done online these days. A couple of points about your question on the "best way" to go about it:

1. Scholarly articles are considered more current than books, because the turn-around time for publishing is months rather than years. Many scholarly articles are available online. Look for the words "peer review," meaning the articles are accepted by peers in the same field. A few good ways to access those are Google Scholar, ERIC.ed.gov, or your library's online database.

2. Some entire books are available publicly online. It's hard to know what your student's topic will be, but online resources range from SparkNotes to Merriam-Webster Dictionary. I merged my son's research paper with "career exploration," and one of his go-to resources was the Occupational Outlook Handbook available through the U.S. Bureau of Labor and Statistics, http://www.bls.gov/ooh/

3. Not sure if you are affiliated with a library at all, either over there or back here in the States, but my library lets us check out digital versions of some books.

4. There are also online "libraries," such as UPenn, GoodReads, Google Books, and Gutenberg. You may not find as many scholarly topics at some of these sites, but sometimes a paper can use a good quote or analogy.

5. Be sure your student learns the difference between reliable and unreliable online information. This will be a great lesson to prepare for college and career. Wikipedia is a fine source for brainstorming ideas but not for quotes, since anyone can author a Wikipedia article; consider starting with Wikipedia and scrolling to the bibliography at the bottom of the page for potential resources.

6. Personal interviews are highly valued by scholars as well as college professors. Consider locating a local professional to interview - you would be surprised how accessible some folks are. If no professionals relate to your student's topic, he can also consider doing his own "research" by taking a survey or interviewing regular folks with relevant stories to tell.

7. Some of my son's college courses have required presentations, and the students who produce good ones seem to include multi-media - perhaps a short segment from a YouTube video or other visual. You may already know this, but online videos are available for everything from how to fix a door to watching your local legislature in action; current-events-type topics might reference a TED Talk or a political soundbite. Usually the student needs to cite not only the source but the exact minutes/seconds he wants to reference.

HTH,
Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

Mom-n-Zam
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Joined: Sun May 22, 2016 12:32 am

Re: WHL - Living Overseas - Research Paper

Unread post by Mom-n-Zam » Tue May 31, 2016 11:49 am

Many, many thanks - Julie! I appreciate you taking the time to help me understand how this would be possible for us. I'm going to look into several of your suggestions. Blessings from Zambia!

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