Hands-on - Homemade and inexpensive

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OtterMommy
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Hands-on - Homemade and inexpensive

Unread post by OtterMommy » Thu Apr 28, 2011 8:51 am

If you could have only one....
Mexmarr wrote:Re: If you could have only one.... Math Manipulative, what would it be. I am using Singapore math.

I friend told me that I have to have Base 10 blocks. I never used anything other than my fingers, and I wanted opinions. Also, what is the best place to get whatever you would use.

Or, will I get just as much benefit using something like beans?
Just my 2 cents here... We have wooden pattern blocks and cuisenere rods from our previous MFW orders, but my kids love the cheap-o counters we got from a homeschooling company. You could just use beans; our counters stack and we have 10 of 10 different colors. I think it depends on how you learn, what your kids like, etc.
Wife to the best
Mom to ds (6), dd (5), dd (3), and ds (4 months)
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beaglemamma2008
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Re: If you could have only one....

Unread post by beaglemamma2008 » Thu Apr 28, 2011 3:48 pm

I'd say it depends on what level you're doing. We used Base 10 blocks for 2A, and it made addition and subtraction with regrouping easy-peasy! :)

You could do 10 beans glued onto a craft stick (then swap the stick out for 10 individual beans) or 10 craft sticks bundled together with a rubber band (then take the rubber band off to separate them into 10 individual sticks) for a younger level. But in my opinion, when you start getting into working with hundreds, Base 10 blocks are so much easier. :)

And just one more thought ... if money is tight and these seem too expensive right now, you can always print out cubes, rods, and flats and have your dc work with those. (A Microsoft Word document with a 1x1 table for a cube, a 1x10 table for a rod, and a 10x10 table for a flat.) Just a thought. :)
Jennifer, mom to:
Hannah, 8. Finished and loved K, 1st, & Adventures. Currently loving ECC.
Millie, 5. Finished Pre-K and K "lite." Currently playing her way through K "for real."

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Julie in MN
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Re: If you could have only one....

Unread post by Julie in MN » Thu Apr 28, 2011 4:11 pm

I guess looking back, I also pulled out the base 10 blocks even when learning multiplication & division. But like Jennifer mentioned, you can use paper ones.

You can print off a lot of math manipulatives at sites like Donna Young, if that's more affordable for you.

Another really valuable manipulative for my youngest wasfraction circles (we had a game), because it really helped him see that common denominators (and multiples of those denominators) fit together and made a whole, while *almost the same* denominators would not quite fit. I'm sure you could use card stock, if it was sturdy and cut carefully (so you don't lose the point of an exact fit).

Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
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asheslawson
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Re: If you could have only one....

Unread post by asheslawson » Sat May 07, 2011 9:25 pm

Hello...found a good set if you do want to get a set of base 10 blocks @ rainbow resource center.

Found some super cheap counting connecting cubes for @ american science & surplus (sciplus.com). Just in case you do want them. I don't think you have to have them - but I think they are helpful and the kids like to use them. Just my input...in case you are still considering (sorry - just noticed the post so I'm late)
"So then, just as you received Christ Jesus as Lord, continue to live in Him" Colossians 2:6
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Poohbee
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Re: If you could have only one....

Unread post by Poohbee » Sat May 07, 2011 11:05 pm

I have purchased some math manipulatives, but truly, you may have a lot of things around your house that would work well. Using suggestions in the MFW 1st grade TM, I put together baggies of math manipulatives when my oldest dd was learning addition and subtraction, and I keep them in our "math drawer" in our school area. I have baggies of Legos, checkers, buttons, beans and bean sticks (ten beans glued to a craft stick--my dd made those during 1st grade), fabric squares and colored circles. I also have an assortment of coins and a baggie of dice that I keep in that drawer, as well. Add some different jar lids, small bowls, or cups of some kind for sorting the objects, and you have a very nice collection. These things, along with the Math Sense Blocks (now replaced by Cuisenaire Rods), pattern blocks, and geoboards make up the bulk of our math manipulatives. Actually, I was at our local teacher store today, and I was contemplating buying either Unifix cubes or Base 10 blocks, but then I started thinking about all of the different things I have at home, and I didn't buy them. I decided that Legos or Math Sense Blocks would serve my purposes just as well. It's always good to save money when you can. So, look around your house and you may find a great assortment of things you can use for math manipulatives. Just put them in baggies and keep them in a place where you can always grab them when you need them.
Jen
happily married to Vince (19 yrs)
blessed by MFW since 2006
have used every year K-1850MOD
2018-2019: Adventures with 9yo boy

cbollin

K/1st grade math activities online resources???

Unread post by cbollin » Sun Jul 17, 2011 8:34 pm

IntoTheirHearts wrote:Does anyone have any good online references for hands on math activities to do around the house? We are going to be doing MFW 1st grade but I did not purchase the recommended math book (The Complete Book of Math). I got a different book to use instead that is a Charlotte Mason inspired math book. I will still use the activities and games that are written into the 1st grade teachers manual. But would like some additional activities to do which I have since learned the Complete Book of Math has ideas in it. But since I didn't buy that, I would like to have an online resource with some ideas, preferably broken up by math topic so it is easy to find an activity for patterns or addition or time, etc.

Then again, it isn't that expensive, so perhaps I should just buy the Complete Math Book anyhow. Any thing else out there you can recommend? Thanks,
Laura
This isn't an online suggestion... but in the MFW 1st grade manual, you'll have a list of math literature books. Many of those books will have fun ideas in them as well. There are some extra ideas on some topics in Complete Book of Math, but it's mostly a workbook that is supplementary to everything else in the math program in MFW 1st.

I'd start with the library books that are listed.
Then look around in the Math topics on the 1st grade forum.. here's a quick link
http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewforum.php?f=22

I was sitting around glancing through the spring 2011 edition of The Old SchoolHouse magazine. There was an article in there on basic math around the house. Maybe someone you know locally gets that magazine? It has a lot of simple and fun stuff.

Some ideas for measurement from my kitchen....
Let them cook with you and measure it all.

Have fun finding out how many teaspoons fills up a tablespoon, or how many 1/2 cups fills a 1 cup.
Stack and unstack your measuring cups and see which is larger - 1/3 or 1/2 or 1/4.
get a kitchen scale: weight things.
Read labels on packages - how much does this weigh
how many cups of flour are in a 5 pound bag?

Take a ruler and tape measure and measure everything.

Make math games at the grocery store: tell them to find and name 5 things that cost almost $5 (i.e. 4.99). cost almost $10. How much does it cost for that box of cereal per ounce?
Or, get a small calculator and let them track your purchases. (don't sweat that it's a calculator... they are keeping up with a lot of information.)

can someone get a fun treat to use U Scan at checkout and have to follow the screen to weigh the produce?

laundry: pair the socks. count them by 2's. sort laundry by person. sort laundry by other category (undies, shirts, socks, color of item)

shapes: do the C. Rods and Animal Patterns books in MFW k and 1st. lots of ideas in that animal pattern book.

uhmm..... organize books on shelves at home by height, etc. toys...

have them count their collections of toys and sort them.

play grocery store at home when you have them put stuff away.

and definitely do the games in math first grade.

-crystal

Dusenkids
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Re: K/1st grade math activities online resources???

Unread post by Dusenkids » Sun Jul 17, 2011 10:19 pm

We just started using http://www.internet4classrooms.com/month2month.htm last week, maybe two ?? Have not been through all the activities but like what I have used so far. Is this the kind of thing you are looking for?
Martie
Married to Nathan 15 years
Mom to 8 boys ages 12 to newborn
Have used Kindergarten to Modern

jasntas
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Re: K/1st grade math activities online resources???

Unread post by jasntas » Mon Jul 18, 2011 9:29 am

Not much to add other than to say that we did a lot of the projects listed in some of the books from the TM book basket math section. Both my dc enjoyed getting involved in those activities, especially the ones involving candy as they got a before lunch treat when the activity of that day was over. 8O Of course I could have waited and had them do the activity after lunch. ;) I remember a favorite being the M & M book. I think there was a similar project in the Complete Book of Math.

I think there were usually one or two hands on activities at the beginning of each new section of the CBoM. They were fun but with the books from book basket and some of the other resources you've been given and the fact that you have another math book, it would not necessarily be needed.

You did not ask about the daily word problem that's suggested in the 1st grade TM but I just posted about this on another thread. For 1st grade I added in a daily word problem math sheet. The 1st TM suggests adding in a word problem each day and I'm not very creative with coming up with something different so I purchased a couple of different word problem books but settled on, and really liked, Evan-Moor Daily Word Problems Math for Grade 1 . My dc really liked them as each week would have a different animal theme. We would all do this together and I didn't expect my 1st grade dd to know how to do the problems by herself. But it was a great introduction to all kinds of different math concepts and good review for my ds.

There is also a free resource for daily mental math problems here:
http://www.aea267.k12.ia.us/cia/math/Ro ... tml#mental

Sorry if this is TMI. It's definitely more than you asked for.
Tammie - Wife to James for 27 years
Mom to Justin (15) and Carissa (12)
ADV & K 2009-2010 . . . RTR (again) & WHL 2016-2017
http://tammiestime.blogspot.com/
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jasntas
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recipes for practicing capacity...

Unread post by jasntas » Mon Sep 26, 2011 9:57 am

SarahP wrote:I am looking for some good recipes to let my son (8 years old) try on his own (with supervision) to practice capacity for math.

Thanks,
Sarah
You could use water, sand, beans, etc. and different sized measuring cups. For instance, fill a half cup with beans then pour the beans into a cup. Is this what you are asking?

Recipes as in cooking, we use Kraft Mac N Cheese, too. My dd can almost make it without the instructions. ;)
Tammie - Wife to James for 27 years
Mom to Justin (15) and Carissa (12)
ADV & K 2009-2010 . . . RTR (again) & WHL 2016-2017
http://tammiestime.blogspot.com/
The days of a mother are long but the years are short.

cbollin

Re: recipes for practicing capacity...

Unread post by cbollin » Mon Sep 26, 2011 10:56 am

Agreeing with Tammie.. There's at least 2 ways to approach it...

"active play"
*play with measuring cups over a tray with beans, salt, corn meal, sand, etc.
*play with cups and water over the sink

Cooking food:
anything or anytime you are cooking, have the child do the measuring. It could be pasta. It could be what my 9 y.o does and use the recipe on the Kraft mac and cheese boxes (blush).
It could be cakes, cookies,
find your favorite muffins to make...
measure out your boxed cereals.

or measure out a cup of milk/water/juice and pour that into glasses and have them set the table.
oh.... a summer favorite --- lemonade mix. Ok, I would have liked it to have been real lemon juice too. and sometimes we do...

Pancakes: go and get a box of pancake mix to start with. follow the direction and cook some pancakes together. Yes, at that age they can flip them with supervision.

Joyce's Baked Oatmeal (yes folks, this is the "mfw fed me once and I will not go away recipe" scaled back for single family use)
preheat oven to 350 degrees
"grease" an 8x8 pan (cooking spray)

in large bowl combine all of these
3 cups Quick cooking oats
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1 cup milk
1/2 cup veggie oil
2 eggs lightly beaten
maybe a light bit of extra milk if needed..
mix, pour in pan. bake at 350, for 30-35 minute or until set.

hmm.... I wonder if it's ok to list the Russian manyiak recipe from EX1850?
jasntas wrote:we use Kraft Mac N Cheese. My dd can almost make it without the instructions. ;)
It's how my youngest learned about subtracting fractions. She was use to a recipe on one of the boxes that called for 1/2 cup milk. so she poured 1/2 cup in. I showed her "it says 1/4" and we looked where 1/4 was marked. My sweetie picked up that measuring cup, and drank off 1/4 cup. set it down "1 slash 2 cup take away something now is 1 slash 4 milk"
YES!

-crystal

Julie - Staff
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Re: K/1st grade math activities online resources???

Unread post by Julie - Staff » Thu May 10, 2012 12:45 am

There are additional ideas for homemade/inexpensive manipulatives in the Complete Book of Math, as well as some user ideas posted in the 1st grade archives:
http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php ... 797#p78704

Yodergoat
Posts: 243
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sort of OT: math games using polyhedral dice

Unread post by Yodergoat » Thu Aug 09, 2012 4:02 pm

We "invented" a fun addition game for First today using the game "Hi Ho Cherry-O." Of course this was a great game for preschool, when my daughter was first learning to count. But she had outgrown it and wanted to give it away. I tucked it away, thinking I'd come up with some use for it.

Today I brought it out during school and added two dice. These are unusual dice, one being a pyramidal shape with the numbers 1 through 4. The other is a traditional cube with the numbers 1 through 6 printed as numerals and not with dots. I didn't want her to "just count" the dots to add. We rolled the 4-sided and 6-sided dice, added the two numbers, and then took that many fruits off the tree. Since there were just two of us, we each had two trees. Each game went pretty quickly, but it was fun. My daughter enjoyed it thoroughly and by the end of the game she wasn't having to add in her head any more... she was remembering the answers.

Just thought I'd share a fun use for this particular game board. Of course one wouldn't have to use the dice to play it, but could use flashcards or devise some other way of getting random numbers.

But since I was thinking of it, I thought I would post about these dice because they have so many possibilities for all sorts of math games, and it is possible that some folks have never heard of them. They are usually called "polyhedral dice" and are available from various sources, including Rainbow Resource and many game and hobby shops, and are usually available in a set which includes a 4, 6, 8, 10, sometimes a tens place as well, 12, and 20.
049322.jpg
a set of polyhedral dice, including tens place
049322.jpg (31.15 KiB) Viewed 6928 times
They're really neat and can be fun for learning all sorts of things like percentages, place value, etc. I especially like the tens place die... you roll it and a regular 10 sided together to get any number from 0 to 100. If you can't find the tens place die, you can take two 10-sided of different colors and designate one to always be the tens place.

Fun stuff, with lots of possibilities. And it can be a change of pace and something good for active learners to do with their hands. :)
I'm Shawna...
... a forgiven child of God since 1994 (age 16)
... happily wed to William since 1996
... mother of our long-awaited Gail (3/15/2006)
... missing 6 little ones (4 miscarriages, 2 ectopics)
... starting Rome to the Reformation this fall!

Mom2theteam
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Re: sort of OT: math games using polyhedral dice

Unread post by Mom2theteam » Thu Aug 09, 2012 11:50 pm

Yay for being creative!!! I was creative with our math game a few days ago....a little creative anyway. ;)

I took the cards I'd made for number war and gave my son a greater-than/less-than symbol (just a card with it drawn on). He had to use that card symbol to tell me which number was higher, his or mine. He thought it was great. And of course, I made him tell me how many more one was than the other on the easier ones. It reinforced the symbols well and was fun. :-)
Heather
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Mom to 6, ages 10, 7, 7, 5, 5, 3
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Yodergoat
Posts: 243
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Re: sort of OT: math games using polyhedral dice

Unread post by Yodergoat » Fri Aug 10, 2012 9:05 am

I like that idea, Heather! Thanks for sharing!
I'm Shawna...
... a forgiven child of God since 1994 (age 16)
... happily wed to William since 1996
... mother of our long-awaited Gail (3/15/2006)
... missing 6 little ones (4 miscarriages, 2 ectopics)
... starting Rome to the Reformation this fall!

MelissaB
Posts: 369
Joined: Sun May 09, 2010 10:01 pm

Math Visuals

Unread post by MelissaB » Thu Jan 01, 2015 10:34 am

Hi, All ~

For us Moms with hands-on learners, may i share something we've learned recently that could have saved us a lot of time and money? :)

We knew early on that our youngest dd is a hands-on, visual learner. Knowing that, we researched hands-on math curriculums. The curriculum we ultimately chose is good; and we are not displeased at all.

However, we realize now that we very easily could have used any quality math curriculum and simply used these tools:

1. abacus - even with our wonderful hands-on curriculum, this tool is our best friend for teaching addition, subtraction, and multiplication (up to 10's).
2. Egg carton and 144 marbles - is a highly effective tool for teaching multiplication/division.
3. The most effective tool we've ever used for Place Value was in the MFW 1st curriculum: popsicle sticks [Adding one a day then bundling by 10 and finally 100].

Just wanted to share with you all what we've learned. I wish that we would have used those tools and saved a lot of time, and money. :)

Growing in Christ in all things {Eph.4:15} ~
Melissa
Melissa B. (Arkansas)
Girls ages 16 & 13
Completed K, 1st, and Investigate {ECC; CTG; RTR; Expl.-1850; and 1850-Mod. Times}
"That they may teach the young women to be sober, to love their husbands, to love their children,.." Titus 2:4

MelissaB
Posts: 369
Joined: Sun May 09, 2010 10:01 pm

Re: Math Visuals

Unread post by MelissaB » Mon Jan 05, 2015 4:50 pm

Julie in MN wrote:Melissa,
Tell me about egg cartons and 144 marbles. I'm assuming it has to do with multiplying up to 12x12, but how do you plan activities that reinforce those facts? I've got a 2nd grade grandson who loves marbles :)
We got the idea to use the egg carton and marbles from the Mancala game (ECC, I think?). I have girls, so we would say that each hole represents a friend. Then I would ask, "How many friends do you have?" (say, 5) "If you wanted to give each friend 4 M&M's (dd's fav), how many pieces would you need to have?" We pretend another friend comes along… and we repeat the process, adding 4 new marbles each time. You can write the little facts (1x4=4, 2x4=8, etc.) on tiny pieces of paper and stick them in each hole as well.

With a boy… you might have five trucks, and need four tires on each truck? Not sure how those little men work… ;)
Julie in MN wrote:Thanks, Melissa. Marbles and M&Ms, can't go wrong there! And I agree hands-on work with math is so beneficial throughout the elementary years, even for my mathy, workbook-loving little man.

Great ideas!
Melissa B. (Arkansas)
Girls ages 16 & 13
Completed K, 1st, and Investigate {ECC; CTG; RTR; Expl.-1850; and 1850-Mod. Times}
"That they may teach the young women to be sober, to love their husbands, to love their children,.." Titus 2:4

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