Singapore - Why MFW suggests this (David Hazell reply)

Julie in MN
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Singapore - Why MFW suggests this (David Hazell reply)

Unread post by Julie in MN » Fri Feb 18, 2005 9:48 pm

JoyfulDancer wrote:I noticed Singapore Math is suggested on the new tentative list for Adventures for next year. Has anyone used it? Why is it being suggested? I'm wondering, because we aren't happy with the math we are using, Math-U-See, and someone suggested Singapore math to me. So now I'm curious why it's been recommended here.

Thanks,
Laurie
We are using Singapore. We just happen to have chosen it, after trying a couple other things [before MFW had math recommendations].

My ds (3rd grade) started this year in 2B and that went quickly. It has been great for ds, as he already prefers to do math in his head & says, "Finally, somebody gets how I do math!"

I think what Singapore is famous for would include its "mental math," its word problems, and it's "bar" diagrams. It also introduces a variety of math concepts from an early age, and offers a variety of ways to solve a problem.

That said, no program is perfect for everyone. I have an older dd who does not want to be given a variety of ways to do a math problem (LOL!). And it might go too quickly for kids who like to settle in a place for a while. Also, it's really up to you as the teacher to do math drill. This is usually done by the classroom teacher in Singapore, not by the textbook. (And ECC schedules it in for us!)

Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
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david
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MFW and Singapore

Unread post by david » Wed Feb 23, 2005 9:42 am

We want you all to know that MFW has officially adopted Singapore Math as our choice math program. We struggled for 5 years to make our official choice. We evaluated a number of programs. Finally when the US Edition of Singapore became available we had our youngest do it. We really liked that she could complete the daily tasks in about 20-30 minutes. As you know MFW likes advanced, inexpensive and simple. Singapore as all that. When our daughter finished four semesters of work (2a,2b,3a,3b) we had her take a Saxon placement test just to help give us an idea how she as progressing. She tested at the 7th grade level even though there were many concepts in that level of Saxon that Singapore had not covered yet. We wondered how she got the answers so we looked at her work. Singapore had taught her so many ways to think about numbers that she simply figured out difficult concepts on her own. To say the least we were impressed. We also had heard from customers who had used our kindergarten and First grade programs including the math exactly as we had designed it without any additional supplements. They testify that their child was able to slide quickly through a typical math program at the 2nd grade level. They wanted more challenging math. Singapore provides this without adding hours to our homeschool schedule.

As always we never recommend something until it is well tested and we are satisfied with its simplicity. Unfortunately nothing is perfect so we strive to make what we sell easier. We are currently writing lesson plans that are simple and straight forward for every level of Singapore Primary Math. We know there are others available but we strive for simplicity in a MFW style.

We also know that the one weakness in the program is a lack of practice and teaching of the basic facts (addition, subtraction, multiplication and division). Initially we added another program as many of you do for this but in the long run it just added to much time. We found that a simple use of flashcards and a dedicated parent was all that was needed. So MFW's final recommendation is Singapore Math and Flashcards.

Poohbee
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math dilemma

Unread post by Poohbee » Tue Dec 14, 2010 2:04 pm

1974girl wrote:Man-I hope you guys can give me some wise advice on this one! My 10 year old can do math....she just hates it. We have used Saxon for the past 2 years. She hates the 60-100 problems per day in addition to the 28 homework problems. She hates doing the same thing over and over and cries about it. (But isn't that supposed to be the magic of Saxon)
Just one opinion, but you may want to just consider cutting back the number of problems she is required to do.

My 4th grade dd is doing Singapore 3A. We've done Singapore from the beginning. One of the things I really like about Singapore is that often, there are only about 9-12 problems on each workbook page. Sometimes there are more problems, on a review or practice page, but usually it is around 9-12. There is a lot of opportunity for extra practice in Singapore. Often, there are 2 different extra practice pages in the text to review each concept. I usually only have my dd do one of the practice pages. And sometimes, if there are alot of problems, I ask her to do either the odd-numbered problems or the even-numbered problems. I used to do that when I taught 5th grade in public school, too. When I cut the number of problems in half on an assignment, the kids thought it was a special treat for them. You can always add more of those problems again if extra practice is needed. Your dd might think it is really great if you tell her she only has to do half of the problems on the page. My dd likes math, but she would go nuts if she had to do 28 problems every day, especially if she has the concept down and she knows what she's doing.

If you try cutting the number of problems down and your dd still breaks down in tears when she sees the workbook, she may have such a bad association with that particular math book/curriculum that you may want to change. Consider Singapore, which has a very manageable workload each day, and there is much opportunity for extra practice and review.

Just one opinion for you.
Jen
happily married to Vince (19 yrs)
blessed by MFW since 2006
have used every year K-1850MOD
2018-2019: Adventures with 9yo boy

MFW-Lucy

re: math dilemma

Unread post by MFW-Lucy » Tue Dec 14, 2010 2:40 pm

Poohbee wrote: One of the things I really like about Singapore is that often, there are only about 9-12 problems on each workbook page. Sometimes there are more problems, on a review or practice page, but usually it is around 9-12. There is a lot of opportunity for extra practice in Singapore. Often, there are 2 different extra practice pages in the text to review each concept.
This is also one of the aspects that our family loved about Singapore math. We had used another program and my non-mathy child would really get bogged down.

If you reduce the number of Saxon problems, you probably know this, but you can not just do odd or even or the first half etc. since Saxon builds review of previous lessons into every lesson. You will have to go through and mark for her which ones to do so that you make sure she has the review. On concepts you know she has you can just have her skip the review.

Even in the upper Saxon levels (7th and up) that MFW recommends, the MFW lesson plans on many days do not assign all of the problems. We had a career math teacher write these for us. We started Saxon without them and once MFW came out with them my kids were so happy they did not have to do ALL 30 problems everyday (that's even in the upper levels) :) .

Praying you find the best solution for your daughter!

Lucy

gratitude
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Re: math dilemma

Unread post by gratitude » Tue Dec 14, 2010 9:01 pm

We switched to Singapore this year, and it was a great switch.

He loves Singapore. It makes him think more than Horizon did, and there is less drill. He used to complain some, but not once about Singapore since he finds the problems more interesting. He is understanding math, and isn't that an important part of the math process?

I hope you find a solution soon!

gratitude
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Saxon vs. Singapore for 2nd grade.

Unread post by gratitude » Wed May 16, 2012 3:08 pm

afelton wrote:My son did Saxon 1 in 1st grade and did well with it. I know MFW recommends Singapore for 2nd. What are the main differences and has anyone used both and have an opinion on which one is best? I really want him to keep doing well. I have heard there isn't a lot of review in Singapore like in Saxon. Any advice is helpful. BTW...We are loving MFW. Starting adventures next year!

Amanda
I haven't used Saxon but I have seen friends using it with their kids at a kitchen table; so I have seen the first grade Saxon but not used it. My ds8 has completed 1A, 1B, and 2A. My ds7 is almost done with 1A.

What I like about Singapore: I like the fact that it is easy to teach, the workbook takes very little time to do, and it teaches mathematical thinking. I like the way it 'teaches' math and works through the problems. It involves more thinking about math than most programs that learn by repitition (we used Horizon K before Singapore).

What I don't like about Singapore: It lacks review. My ds8 is strong in thinking math, but his math foundation I think could really benefit from some additional 'time' doing math.

Our math drills have been mostly inconsistent; so this too is my fault. I need more structure for the review and drills than Singapore provides. I noticed math drills are on the ECC grid, so that could possibly help me (they may even be on the ADV grid. :~ ;) ). So I have been thinking about various ways to solve these two problems next fall. I am planning on continuing Singapore, but I am thinking of possibly adding another program for additional practice, and just not do all of the other program.

I hope this helps.

afelton
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Re: Saxon vs. Singapore for 2nd grade.

Unread post by afelton » Wed May 16, 2012 4:02 pm

Something for Singapore review I saw shared in another post was Frank Schaeffer Singapore Math Practice. They mention you could get it off of Amazon.
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cbollin

Re: Saxon vs. Singapore for 2nd grade.

Unread post by cbollin » Wed May 16, 2012 4:16 pm

I've never used Saxon below 87.

The Frank Shaffer books (not published by singapore math) can be found in teacher supply stores too.

The way I reviewed Singapore:
do math drills - I agree that it would be very nice if that drill reminder was in each of the mfw manuals or at least in the MFW Singapore lessons... (I have much older versions of the lesson planners so I added that until it became habit for me.)
and then, we did the review units in the textbook together as reviews. Because I was teaching concepts to my child, and the program has incremental steps, I made sure that we reviewed from the few pages before when it made the most sense. "here honey.. try numbers 1-4 with this"... The review seemed natural to me. We had learned several ways to teach a concept and as teacher I reviewed those along the way. It was especially fun for me in the applications section (the B books) to review the computation concepts in new ways with measurements, etc....

ways to add drill: can be as easy as the flashcards that mfw sells. I liked using a variety of things..

-crystal

gratitude
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Re: Saxon vs. Singapore for 2nd grade.

Unread post by gratitude » Wed May 16, 2012 5:44 pm

cbollin wrote:The way I reviewed Singapore:
Because I was teaching concepts to my child, and the program has incremental steps, I made sure that we reviewed from the few pages before when it made the most sense. "here honey.. try numbers 1-4 with this"... The review seemed natural to me. We had learned several ways to teach a concept and as teacher I reviewed those along the way. It was especially fun for me in the applications section (the B books) to review the computation concepts in new ways with measurements, etc....
Thank you for sharing this Crystal. It is helpful for me to read how others teach. It never dawned on me to review as we go. I did do the Singapore test book for a review of 2A, but some piece is missing for me in the teaching of Singapore. Perhaps it is what you just wrote..basic review as we go. He is doing great on the IOWA test in math that we are doing this week; but it is also very obvious to me that we haven't been doing our math fact drills (slow speed in basic addition); since it is not timed it doesn't matter, but it is giving me something to think about. Review as one teaches would be good.


To the original poster: SIngapore is great for content. Wonderful for teaching basic math. Some of the things my kids come up with, during non-math times, regarding math really surprise me sometimes. My oldest Knows math. I have no idea if he would know it as well using Saxon, but he really does know it from having done Singapore.

DaniWestRN
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Re: Saxon vs. Singapore for 2nd grade.

Unread post by DaniWestRN » Wed May 16, 2012 6:25 pm

For those of you who need a little help with the math drills (a weakness of mine), you might try xtramath.org . It's free and seems to be working well with my oldest to practice addition/subtraction facts.
Last edited by DaniWestRN on Wed May 16, 2012 10:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Danielle, Mommy to DD#1- 3rd/ECC, DS#1 -2nd/ECC, DD#2- K, DS#2- pre-K, and DD#3- learning to toddle

cbollin

Re: Saxon vs. Singapore for 2nd grade.

Unread post by cbollin » Wed May 16, 2012 6:44 pm

we like xtramath too. my youngest will actually do it. and it doesn't let you stay on for too long to get too tired.

((hugs)) on standardized testing. One of my testing clients used a textbook program with lots of drill and her 2nd grader didn't test well this year with math stuff. poor sweetie broke down in tears. I felt awful and stopped the test for her (untimed) and let her get a hug from her mom. poor sweetie couldn't remember facts and just wanted to have lunch. ((hugs))

-crystal
Last edited by cbollin on Thu May 17, 2012 5:42 am, edited 1 time in total.

gratitude
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Re: Saxon vs. Singapore for 2nd grade.

Unread post by gratitude » Thu May 17, 2012 12:23 am

afelton wrote:Thanks for the replies. Still hoping to hear from someone who has used both in the lower grades? Just trying to decide if I should switch.
I am glad that I switched from Horizon to Singapore for 1st grade math almost 2 years ago. I don't know though if Horizon is like Saxon. The reason I am glad is that Singapore has helped him really learn math, think math, and know how to do math. With Horizon I felt like I was getting the practice in for him, but I wasn't able to really help him understand math. The understanding of math allows him to be able to do math, even if presented a slightly different way. Just some thoughts, and bumping you up in the hope someone who has used both will come along.

One thing that might help is to print out samples of SIngapore for one or two books and compare them to what you have been using and see what you think. Another idea might be to print out a sample test and do it together and see what you think. I choose Singapore for the sample test that we did. I liked how it presented concepts. It might help in your decision. Just some ideas.

Blessings as you decide.

MFW-Lucy

Re: Saxon vs. Singapore for 2nd grade.

Unread post by MFW-Lucy » Thu May 17, 2012 11:05 am

Dear Amanda,

I do not think any one mentioned it, but Singapore is recommended by My Father's World beginning in 2nd grade, so your child would not be behind if you switch. (There are some children who may be ready in 1st grade.) MFW First Grade has math included in it. We recommend a hands-on concrete math with a real life math focus before moving into a workbook based program in 2nd grade. Singapore is pictorial in it's teaching style even in the upper levels. For the kids who need a little more practice with concrete hands-on activities, use the pictures to replicate with a manipulative like Cuisenaire Rods or any others you already own. This is especially true for the younger child and this is where you may find yourself spending that extra time to help with understanding a concept, before moving to the workbook problems.

Here are some thoughts from the authors of My Father's World on why they choose to use this with their children and to recommend it:
  • Singapore's Primary Mathematics U.S. Edition has an impressive scope and sequence that introduces skills early with unique and well thought-out methods. For example, simple multiplication and division readiness concepts are introduced in Level 1.

    Another strength of Singapore Math is the strong mental math component. Logical, unique strategies are taught that help students truly understand mathematical concepts. Students are then able to solve problems mentally without always relying on paper and pencil.

    Singapore Math was written for schools in the country of Singapore, which is an English-speaking nation. Singaporean students are distinguished among their international counterparts for receiving high marks in math. Singapore Math is gaining respect and popularity as students’ worldwide benefit from its unique approach. The Primary Mathematics U.S. Edition includes measurement units relative to American culture (U.S. currency, pounds, ounces, etc.).

    We also appreciate the manageable number of workbook problems students are expected to solve on a daily basis. Its effective, parent- and student-friendly format, which we have witnessed in our own home school, makes this a program we highly recommend to others.
Hopefully this information will help you to compare it with what you have been using to decide if you want to move to this program. Another plus about Singapore is children test into the correct level to begin. You can find the information about taking the placement test in the link above.

If you have further questions, please let us know or give us a call at the office at 573-202-2000.

cbollin

Re: Saxon vs. Singapore for 2nd grade.

Unread post by cbollin » Thu May 17, 2012 3:02 pm

Lucy Robertson wrote: Another plus about Singapore is children test into the correct level to begin. You can find the information about taking the placement test in the link above.
just because I'm too chatty today....

I definitely experienced that "plus" (got to love these math puns on math threads) with starting based on placement test vs. "book number = grade level" kind of thing.. It was good to do that with my oldest. My middle - tested and she was border on 1b vs 1a and I went lower with 1a. it was where she needed to start. and oldest - starting in 4B based on placement was good too.

-crystal

afelton
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Re: Saxon vs. Singapore for 2nd grade.

Unread post by afelton » Fri May 18, 2012 9:27 am

I have another reason for wanting to switch. Saxon can just drag on and on with the meeting and the lesson and the class practice and the drill and the worksheets side a and b. I was thinking Singapore sounded much more simple. I will have a 2nd grader, 1st grader, pre-ker, and a 2 yr. Old. I need something that does a great job teaching math but not so much to it.
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gratitude
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Re: Saxon vs. Singapore for 2nd grade.

Unread post by gratitude » Fri May 18, 2012 9:38 am

afelton wrote: I need something that does a great job teaching math but not so much to it.
It does that. Most definitely. Just don't forgot to do flashcard drills, or some kind of math fact drill. It is the only thing I haven't been consistent enough on for speed; but he definitely KNOWS math at the level he is at. I also did add some additional Singapore sheets for the one area that was difficult, and it helped him a lot to do those extra practice sheets. It is also interesting to me that he has learned to do something like 15 + 23 in his head horizontally, in the direction I just wrote it. He doesn't always need the paper and pencil for double digit addition (often does not) due to Singapore. It has some fun ways to understanding math differently than regular math programs. The sample test though really will give you a good idea of what it does, and even though my son tested out of 1A after Horizon K we started with 1A to teach the new Singapore way of doing math before going onto 1B. 1A went very quickly, but it was very worth doing. I hope this helps.

Julie in MN
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Re: Saxon vs. Singapore for 2nd grade.

Unread post by Julie in MN » Fri May 18, 2012 10:09 am

afelton wrote:I have another reason for wanting to switch. Saxon can just drag on and on with the meeting and the lesson and the class practice and the drill and the worksheets side a and b. I was thinking Singapore sounded much more simple. I will have a 2nd grader, 1st grader, pre-ker, and a 2 yr. Old. I need something that does a great job teaching math but not so much to it.
Oh, yes! When I brought my son home to school, MFW didn't have math recommendations. I got Saxon, level 3 I think it was. The teacher manual must have weighed 20 pounds LOL! Singapore was a lovely switch for both of us.
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

cbollin

Re: Saxon vs. Singapore for 2nd grade.

Unread post by cbollin » Sat May 19, 2012 2:14 pm

afelton wrote:Would you say Singapore is harder than other math programs? Is it hard to teach the concepts if you didn't learn math that way?
I certainly didn't learn math the Singapore way. I needed a tiny bit of help to learn how to use bar diagrams on harder stuff. Then it was kinda fun to learn it with my children.

Is it "harder" than other math programs? not harder to learn. I honestly believe Singapore covers concepts in a way that helps students to learn more. Instead of being focused on setting up an equation and doing plug and chug, we got to think about the problem in concrete ways to solve harder stuff.

add drills, because that is assumed in the teaching style instead of given as more workbook pages.
be willing to try and think and ask out loud if you get stuck on how to teach something.
after teaching it, you'll see the things you can naturally review at the end of each unit review.

-crystal

Ruby
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Re: Saxon vs. Singapore for 2nd grade.

Unread post by Ruby » Wed May 23, 2012 7:15 pm

is it too late to add to the "choose Singapore" camp? well, anyway, i had the opportunity to ask a veteran homeschooler about saxon and i was told it is a spiral program, and adds practice and review with each lesson, then moves on quickly to a new concept for the child to learn. and the pace is very fast. singapore is a mastery program and adds "mastering" of new concepts by the introduction of said new concept in textbook and then practice in the workbook. there's even an additional workbook you could purchase called "intensive practice", which just the name scares me off. the idea with singapore is for the child to master the concept before moving on to a new concept. and the review is built into the textbook.
i've read about "calculadder", a timed math drill program, and it sounds very good.
as for singapore manipulatives, i suggest multi-link cubes, because my son was able to count out the blocks to match the problems and see the math being worked out. and a laminated hundreds chart-indispensible!! and lots of patience.

afelton
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Re: Saxon vs. Singapore for 2nd grade.

Unread post by afelton » Thu May 31, 2012 12:05 pm

It's never too late! :)

Ok ladies....I just ordered Singapore 1A and 1B even though he got 88% on 1A, the lesson plans from MFW and the flashcards. I sure hope you are all prepared to come to my rescue when I get stuck. :) I am a little nervous! :) My son is a little nervous too. The test made him think that Singapore is too hard for him. I told him he had to give it a few weeks before he decided it was too hard. ;)
cbollin wrote:we're here...
Thanks! :) I'm glad.
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Julie in MN
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Re: Saxon vs. Singapore for 2nd grade.

Unread post by Julie in MN » Thu May 31, 2012 7:20 pm

It's actually kind of fun for some of us to tackle a Singapore word problem, or try to remember how explain a math concept to a kid. :)

And the help on the boards is definitely a plus.
Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
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Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
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cbollin

What are the advantages of Singapore math?

Unread post by cbollin » Fri Oct 12, 2012 6:25 am

momxnine wrote:I know this question has been answered and I think recently, but I wasn't sure where to look. My daughter is trying to find a math program for her 7 yr. old son. She started off using Singapore but said this, "It doesn't really explain WHY you do things. Just throws in new concepts And shows picture examples. I was still having to explain out of my own brain."

She's thinking about going with MUS, mainly because it has manipulatives, but isn't even sure about using that. I've got Life of Fred, so I'm going to show it to her this weekend when they're here visiting, but she's already got Singapore, so it would be better if she could make it work.

I remember someone, Crystal, I think, writing something about how Singapore is meant to be used, so I was wanting to find any posts about it that might explain the how & why of it to send to my daughter.
Vicki,
Is she using anything like the Home Instructor Guide to explain the program? I'd start there.... (check rainbow resource catalog for it)

hopefully one of those people who find archives will find threads to help to use the textbook and workbook together. I'd look for some tips from Julie on the explaining how she uses it.. I tend to talk about specific lessons, but less on general how to of the book.
http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php?f=23&t=1427

I've re-read your daughter's comment and still am a little confused. Is she expecting a script with Singapore? The way I've taught it is to use the pictures as my premade chalkboard (as Julie calls it). Explain using the thought bubbles, do it hand over hand with my child with real objects in front of us. Like others have said recently on another singapore thread..... go get some blocks, or objects. you can use the C. Rods (mfw sells those in kindy)... it can be lego, it can anything.

but part of teaching singapore is also starting with objects that can be seen and touched and moving them around.

-crystal

gratitude
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Re: What are the advantages of Singapore math?

Unread post by gratitude » Fri Oct 12, 2012 9:02 am

I think the advantages to Singapore is how the problems are approached. The type of thinking that is required to do many of the problems. The fact that it is based on a base 10 system. The thinking aspect to the program. The fact that it 'uses' and 'applies' mathematical concepts.

It isn't focused on doing math facts over and over, or spiraling through math concepts. It has more of a mastery approach to each topic that resurface in the next book. It teaches 'how to do & think math' rather than teaching math by doing it over and over again (helpful for math fact drills, but those can be added to Singapore; not as helpful for understanding math). It has more of the 'why' math does what it does built into the program. It is the way the problems are presented that is the greatest math strength / advantage that I see in Singapore.

I have heard the Home Instructor's Guide helps a lot of mothers teach Singapore. I haven't used it myself.

The Singapore text teaches the concepts without explaining them; this is true. It has been up to me to explain them since I am not using the Singapore Teacher's Manual or Home Instructors Guide. This is true though for any math book. It is the Teacher's Manuals that have the explanations for the lessons in other math programs; not the student book. So my guess is that the Home Instructor's Guide might really help your daughter have the explanations she is wanting.

Julie in MN
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Re: What are the advantages of Singapore math?

Unread post by Julie in MN » Fri Oct 12, 2012 9:30 am

This is a fun question for me to think back on, now that my youngest is several years past Singapore. Actually, I find myself wishing he could do things like they did in Singapore elementary, or wishing we had time to go back and review those books again (not much time once they start doing 50 problems a day or problems that take an hour). Why?

I think the exciting thing about Singapore for me was that it taught students how to think about math, and it did that in a very basic, elementary way. It can be scary for those of us raised on "how to do math." But the real world is such that there are many ways to approach a mathematical situation, not just one way to do things. Singapore shows that very early on, using easy problems that don't seem to need so many choices.

The other thing Singapore does exceptionally well is getting kids used to juggling multiple pieces of math at the some time. As Crystal used to say, some programs have word problems that you don't have to even read - if you're learning multiplication, then scan the word problem for 2 numbers, and multiply them. With Singapore, by 6th grade the student can juggle those problems with different drivers leaving home at different times and traveling at different speeds and figure out where the meet, often doing the subtracting, multiplying, and dividing in the student's head. Or they can think about a salesperson who paid a certain amount for inventory, sold some at full price and other amounts at different discounts at later times in the day, and see what the actual profit is. These kinds of problems prepare the young learner for algebraic thinking, but they also prepare the student for real life. As one math teacher said, don't think you can just have a computer do everything - you have to be able to tell the computer what exactly it should do with your data.

Of course in those first years of Singapore, it doesn't feel like you're doing all that, but really even those early examples are preparing the student by showing in pictures and thought bubbles that there are various ways to think something through.

Well, maybe that's not exactly what you were asking, but what I was thinking about :). Keep asking, it's good to think these things thru. I've enjoyed reading the replies.
Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
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Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
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rebeccal2002
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Re: What are the advantages of Singapore math?

Unread post by rebeccal2002 » Sat Oct 13, 2012 12:41 pm

I just thought I'd "add" (ha,ha):

I used Horizon's Math for my older girls when they started out. It was a pretty frustrating experience for all of us. (All the repititious worksheets!) I ended up using Teaching Textbooks just to give us all a break. That is working out for them now.

My point here, however: I started from the beginning using Singapore for my son. We ENJOY the math lessons! So EASY to teach. I don't over explain the lessons. We use manipulatives that I got from Sonlight a long time ago to use with Horizons. He grasps the concepts pretty simply the first time. This could just be because he has a "brain wired for math." But I also think that Singapore is leading his brain in the right direction. He is able to regroup while adding/subtracting and do all that faster than me most times. :) He, at 8, is multiplying like a champ (without the route memorization of tables, yet). He knows WHY and WHAT he is multiplying. The base ten idea really works for him. I think there is no end of analyzing math programs. I'm learning that MFW has pretty much narrowed down all the choices to the best of the best. I hope it all works out for your friend's child.

Rebecca
HS'ing since 2006, MFW since 01/2011 :)
2015/16: ECC (2nd time around w/ 3rd, 6th and 8.5 grader), WHL (10th). Also 2nd half of K and 1st for 6 year old.

Finished K, 1st, ECC, CTG, RTR, Exp-1850, 1850-MOD, AHL

and 4 year old helping!

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