ECC - 7-8th Missionary bios with sensitive children

Issues specific to teaching 6th to 8th graders, including the transition to Saxon math, Apologia science, Progeny Press guides, and grammar lessons
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4Truth
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Joined: Fri Dec 17, 2004 11:59 am

ECC - 7-8th Missionary bios with sensitive children

Unread post by 4Truth » Wed Sep 19, 2007 1:34 pm

Teresa in TX wrote:I purchased the 4-book set of missionary biographies for 7th-8th graders. Dd hasn't started them yet, but will in a few weeks (she's doing a progeny press guide at the moment).

I've read 3 of the 4 books and they were so very good!! I look forward to their impact on her. "Peace Child", though, I just don't think my daughter could handle the cannibalism stories. There are some things in the other books that are hard to read, but nothing that I couldn't just vaguely describe then tell her to avoid that page if she chooses. Any thoughts?

I guess I understand the need to know the depravity without Christ, but wow!! Do others just set a book aside?
Teresa
I would consider reading the book aloud *with* your dd so that you can discuss as you go along.

Also, has anyone read Gracia Burnham's book, In the Presence of My Enemies? We have it, but haven't got around to reading it yet, so I was planning on doing it when we do ECC (next after we finish RTR).

Martin and Gracia's story is a pretty recent event that was all over the news media. It would show that all missionaries aren't from the past, and these kinds of things still happen today. Also what kind of testimony we can tell through the media. Since Gracia is still alive and well, I'd think it would be easy to relate to her story of faith even while witnessing her dh's martyrdom. Well okay, not "easy" to relate, but you kwim.
Donna, with two MFW graduates and the "baby" in 9th grade! %| Using MFW since 2004.

TNLisa
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Location: Maine

Unread post by TNLisa » Thu Sep 20, 2007 9:04 am

I agree that Peace Child is probably the more intense of the 4 books. However, the underlying theme is powerful and crucial to understanding the redemptive analogy used within the tribe. Either read it out loud with your child, or have them read independently and discuss it --- but I wouldn't skip it. It is a beautiful story.

My son (will be 13 in March) will definitely read it this year.

Hope that helps -
Blessings,
Lisa

southernshae
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Joined: Wed Mar 22, 2006 9:57 am

Unread post by southernshae » Thu Sep 20, 2007 9:15 am

Hi ladies,
I read all of the 7th-8th grade readers while we did ECC ( I really got them for *me*). I personally had a harder time with Lords of the Earth than with Peace Child. It was disturbing to me because I was just reading along ......then, boom (you'll have to get there to know what I mean, I don't want to give it away). The upsetting parts are near the end. I would definitely pre-read this one if you are considering having your child read it.....JMHO.

Southernshae
4 dc (3 in ps, 1 dc at home)
MFW1 ...slowly.. with ds
Past user of MFW1, ADV, and ECC

TNLisa
Posts: 38
Joined: Fri Apr 20, 2007 7:05 am
Location: Maine

Unread post by TNLisa » Thu Sep 20, 2007 12:18 pm

Lords of the Earth is no longer a recommendation for ECC.

Lucy
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Unread post by Lucy » Thu Sep 20, 2007 5:34 pm

I read Peace Child 2 summers ago and I have read all of these now except for The Narrow Road. Peace Child is difficult and may be just more than some kids are ready for, especially girls. Although the Hazells do have girls who have read this. My son will be 12 and will read it this year.

My husband or I plan to discuss all of the readers with him. I will probably reread them (I am doing lot's of reading this year since my daughter is in high school).

I have to agree with Lisa about Peace Child. I was in awe and crying (actually I cried in all of them at some point) when I realized what it took for these tribes to finally understand the sacrifice that God had made for them. The horrific aspects of their culture only served to make the power of the gospel that much more powerful. I agree that a modern day mission story would be great too, but I did find myself, after reading Peace Child, asking what is it that my neighbors need to relate to, to begin to understand and comprehend the sacrifice that God has made for them. They do not think the way I think and I need to learn what it is that makes them tick and what it is they think about life and God. It is these kinds of things that I want to help my son begin to ponder.

All that said, we all know our own children and what is best for them considering their age and maturity as well as their own sensitivities.

Lucy
wife to Lee and mom to Twila 18 (girl) and Noel 16(boy). Happy MFW user since 2002.

Teresa in TX
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Joined: Fri Mar 16, 2007 4:20 pm

Unread post by Teresa in TX » Sat Sep 22, 2007 9:10 pm

Thanks for the responses everyone. Peace Child is actually the one I haven't finished yet. Maybe I should read it through, and then make a decision on how to handle it. I think the message is needed here...for all of us. I am just wondering if there's a way to share that message while carrying the weight of the horror myself, kwim? I always think of Corey ten Boom's father when I deal with things like this... carrying things my kids may not be able to carry yet. I know dd, and I don't think she could carry it. I think the message may be missed by her because she'd be so disturbed.

It may be a read-aloud and summarize the graphic parts.
Teresa

lyntley
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6th grader?

Unread post by lyntley » Sun Jan 04, 2009 10:22 pm

byhisgrace wrote:Would Missionary Books for 7th and 8th grade be too much for advanced 6th grader? My dd is advanced in reading for her age and I was wanting some input from others about these 4 books before I purchase.

Thanks,
Susan
Posted: Wed Jul 30, 2008 7:55 pm
My 10 YO reads them and loves them.

cbollin

Re: 6th grader?

Unread post by cbollin » Sun Jan 04, 2009 10:25 pm

Posted: Wed Jul 30, 2008 8:17 pm
Just checking.... Susan, you're talking about the set that is for jr. high not the books in the deluxe package right?

Reading level wise -- probably ok. you might want to just preview them a bit for suitability for your child.

A different option, depending on the programs that your child will do in 7th and 8th grade --- you could get more of the YWAM series books that are in EX1850 and 1850MOD. For example, if you think your 6th grader wouldn't enjoy the Narrow Road as much, but you still want to her to read about Brother Andrew, then you could get the Brother Andrew book from 1850MOD and then save Narrow Road if you do 1850MOD and just switch it around and let her read Narrow Road in 8th grade anyway.

In general, reading level you might be ok -- but as always, better to just check on content based on age. They do a lot of growing up in a year between 6th and 7th grade. Maybe there are other regular novels that you'd like her to read or just grab more of the series that is used in the deluxe package???

-crystal

Julie in MN
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Location: Minnesota

Unread post by Julie in MN » Sun Jan 04, 2009 10:26 pm

Posted: Wed Jul 30, 2008 8:24 pm
I loved "I Dared to Call Him Father," but the main character is an adult woman. It starts in her 40s I think. A 6th grader might prefer, as Crystal said, the YWAM biographies. Those always start with the childhood. Although I remember my mom asking me why I kept wanting to read grown-up books instead of kid books :o)

Bruchko was fairly young. And, well, Bruchko's from Minnesota, so that's always good .... :o)
Julie

gressman9
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Re: 6th grader?

Unread post by gressman9 » Sun Jan 04, 2009 10:28 pm

Posted: Thu Jul 31, 2008 7:51 am
Peace Child has some very graphic descriptions in it....the natives are cannibals. My 9th grader read it and my 7th grader read it. They both felt the book was important to read....but just make sure you ds can handle it.

Carylee
mom2seven

Momto3princesses
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Unread post by Momto3princesses » Sun Jan 04, 2009 10:29 pm

Posted: Thu Jul 31, 2008 10:04 am

I read Bruchko out loud to Paige last year (5th grade). She was totally engrossed the whole time although I had to stop frequently to explain some of the things that took place. Great book.

cbollin

ECC 7-8th grade supplement books

Unread post by cbollin » Thu May 27, 2010 10:11 am

4littlehearts wrote:I started reading Peace Child last night and started wondering if this is a book that I wanted my dc (7th grade) to read due to its graphic nature. Are all of the books in the supplement as graphic in their details as this one book? How do you approach this kind of book with your dc? Do you substitute some of the more graphic ones that you may not want your dc to read with other missionary stories? If so, what would you recommend for a child of this age? My dd is not overly sensitive in nature but I still do not know if all of the details of the gore are appropriate for this age group.
Here are my observations to your question.
No, not all of the books were as hard as the first part of Peace Child. The other books are nothing like it. remember too -- Peace Child is scheduled at the very end of ECC.

With our daughter, our approach was to have dad read the book alongside her and they discussed this book together. Worked great.

turning the keyboard over to my daughter..... (who just finished 8th grade). She was 7th grade when she did them.

-crystal

mfwstudent

Re: ECC 7-8th grade supplement books

Unread post by mfwstudent » Thu May 27, 2010 10:36 am

I read the book (Peace Child) when I was in 7th grade. I read it on my own, but my Dad was reading it at the same time and we talked about it together.

The first 5 or so chapters are, as you found out, kind of… Icky and graphic. However, you have to read that part to understand why the Sawi admired Judas for betraying Jesus when Don Richardson told these people the story of Jesus. It wasn’t until Don Richardson figured out how to explain Jesus to the Sawi culture (Jesus is the Peace Child of God) that the Sawi realized what Judas had done in betraying Jesus. I loved hearing that and how every culture has its own redemptive analogy.

That opened my eyes to just how hard it is to be a missionary. Not only is there usually a language barrier and new cultures, but sometimes it’s very hostile.

The other books used in 7th/8th grade are Bruchko, The Narrow Road, and I Dared to Call Him Father. I would say that Peace Child is the most intense and graphic of the four, but only for the first 5 chapters (there are a few more spots, but mostly they’re what you’d expect from a missionary biography).

Bruchko – I liked it. As in most any missionary biography, there are parts where it gets intense. However, it doesn’t go into any large amount of icky details.

The Narrow Road – Well, I love anything Russian, so it’s an automatic sell for me. It’s the story of Brother Andrew. I think his YWAM biography is used in year 5 and liked that one too. The Narrow Road has more details.

I Dared to Call Him Father – It’s the story of a rich and prominent Muslim woman who finds Christ. I don’t remember anything too intense.

So, of course, you have to do what’s right for your family. My parents decided that I was a Teen/Young Adult and was ready for it. I really enjoyed doing Peace Child with my Dad.

4littlehearts
Posts: 49
Joined: Sat Sep 06, 2008 11:05 pm

Re: ECC 7-8th grade supplement books

Unread post by 4littlehearts » Thu May 27, 2010 10:48 am

Thanks Crystal and Crystal's daughter. It does help to hear your perspectives on these books. I did not realize that Peace Child was not scheduled until the end of ECC. I think that helps and gives my dd more time to mature. One of the reasons I was drawn to ECC this year with my kids was the supplement package, but at the time I had never read any of the books. They just sounded like they would be interesting but I guess I just did not anticipate the gore that might be involved in relation to these stories. I am only on about chapter 4 or 5 (I forget) of Peace Child. I will have to finish that book and continue with reading the rest of them before making my decision on how to handle them. Thanks!

cbollin

Re: ECC 7-8th grade supplement books

Unread post by cbollin » Thu May 27, 2010 11:19 am

Like my oldest said -- make the right decision for your needs. It might be the case in your family it means to wait another year. It could mean read it.

Kate didn't want to write this part, but I will. She and her dad did the book together on Sunday mornings instead of Kate going to 7th grade girls Sunday School. We were more concerned about her in that class than her reading this book. so..... yeah... we stopped Sunday School for many weeks and did this book together. Then the high school girls Sunday school teacher started to let Kate attend with 9th-12th grade girls whose brains were in gear.

so, do what's right in your family for any of this, kwim?

-crystal

Julie in MN
Posts: 2941
Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 3:44 pm
Location: Minnesota

Re: ECC 7-8th grade supplement books

Unread post by Julie in MN » Thu May 27, 2010 11:25 am

Wow, I love it when the kids - er, young folks - share! Thank you.

I wanted to add one more reassurance in terms of an overview of the year with ECC.

None of the 7-8th grade bios are scheduled until you get to Brazil (week 9). During those first 8 weeks, the only bio scheduled is the Cameron read-aloud. Cam is a very tame biography. I mean, he has some events, such as being in an earthquake, but basically the message is to realize that folks need the Bible in their "heart language." Cam has a very long and successful life. Meanwhile, your family has learned about prayer needs during Bible time and generally has gotten used to their studies in ECC.

Then when you get to South America, the whole pace of ECC seems to slow down a little, which is nice for family discussion time. The new read-aloud, Nate Saint, is very different than Cameron Townsend. It's across the other end of the spectrum. My 3rd grader noticed the lifespans on the back of the 2 bios were quite different. Then as the Nate story builds, the ECC teacher guide uses Bible time to take you through the meaning of the events in Ecuador, and the ways the sacrifice of 5 missionaries helped a whole people in ways that Nate never knew -- but had faith could happen. Every day during Bible time, you have excerpts to read about what is going to happen in the biography and why. By the time Nate Saint is killed, your children will look at it with much more depth than just a TV show about a murder.

And your 7-8th grader will be reading Bruchko at the same time, probably adding more to your discussion.

So, I just wanted to share that the whole year of ECC will contribute to the way your child reads Peace Child at the end of the year. You may not need to make a final decision until then :)
Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

cbollin

Re: ECC- Missionary Biographies- too heavy for 12 yr old

Unread post by cbollin » Sat Apr 14, 2012 5:32 pm

nathansgirl wrote:Just wondering about the 7th-8th grade supplement for ECC...the four missionary Internationl Adventures biographies are recommended for 13 or 14 and up. We have read many of the Christian Hereo Then & Now but I have never read or looked at the biographies so I am a little worried and wondering they may be to heavy for my 12 year old daughter? If they are does any one have any suggested substitutes?

Thanks,
Carrie
The one that is scheduled last in the year, Peace Child, might be the only "heavy" one. I was concerned a little bit so my dh and dd read it together. The other biographies I previewed and all was good for us. My dd was a little older than 12 though.

I'd give them a try or get them and read them.

I can't remember anything heavy in I Dared to Call Him Father.
The Narrow Road - not remembering anything heavy.
I remember one little section in Bruchko that referred to his torture and captivity...

It's always hard to know someone else's preference or someone else's child.

-crystal

Julie in MN
Posts: 2941
Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 3:44 pm
Location: Minnesota

Re: ECC- Missionary Biographies- too heavy for 12 yr old

Unread post by Julie in MN » Sun Apr 15, 2012 12:22 pm

Carrie,
Has your dd been exposed to missionary bios in the past? For instance, does she know the story of Nate Saint? Could she handle the movie on him, when 5 missionaries lose their lives? Is she able to see the outcome for the tribal people was to know God?

I think absolutely The Narrow Road is fine. It's the story of Brother Andrew, getting Bibles to where they are illegal. You might get nervous at times. And doesn't his monkey have a sad end? Anyways, it's wonderful stuff, I bought another copy right away to give to my sister after we read it.

Also I Dared To Call Him Father, it's about a well-to-do, adult woman listening to the call of God from a Muslim world. Maybe a few nerve-wracking scenes, or a terrible story about someone else, but the main character has nothing horrific happen to her that I recall.

Bruchko is a Minnesota guy, very young, who had some scary things happen, but he's pretty upbeat about it.

Julie

Updated November 2012:
My son hasn't read Peace Child, but I have now read it. It's in 3 parts:
Part 1 - World of the Sawi. This has disturbing parts, which really bring you into the world of a cannibalistic tribe. I'm wondering if sensitive kids could just discuss an overview with a parent, or read some of it after the encouragement of the rest of the book?
Part 2 - When Worlds Meet. This is about the mission beginnings. Lots of good points about missions, and a lovely missionary family.
Part 3 - A World Transformed. This part is about how the Gospel finally reached the tribe that seemed impossible to reach (they wanted to worship Judas rather than Jesus, because they placed highest value on deceiving a close friend). Amazing proof that God is real and God knows each person He created.
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

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