Saxon 8/7 - Users answer questions

Issues specific to teaching 6th to 8th graders, including the transition to Saxon math, Apologia science, Progeny Press guides, and grammar lessons
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cbollin

Saxon 8/7 - Users answer questions

Unread post by cbollin » Wed Oct 15, 2008 10:50 am

Can my 7th grader really go this alone?
Winni wrote:Help! I am really getting nervous about my 7th grader doing Saxon 8/7 alone. She just does so well with my helping her...and she has already had questions. Right now I am able to help her just fine, because she is just starting out and I know the answers (or I can find them in the textbook).

So, I am thinking that maybe I should do this with her...but, gosh, I have 5 children and I can't do EVERYTHING with her, right? Advice, suggestions, anything...please! Thanks.
My daughter tends to just do as much as possible on her own, then asks questions as needed. So far, I'm not following along in each lesson other than to read the chapter title.

When she gets stuff wrong on the problem set, we go over it. Sometimes it is minor stuff, or other times it is time to review. and sometimes it is "let's go back and figure this out a minute...." Usually in my daughter's case (she's good in math) she just really needs someone to bounce the information and say it out loud with someone else.

Transition to independent learning means transition, not there yet. help as needed when needed. I plan to keep that up as long as possible. I can't think too far ahead about high school. My guess is that we'll tell her she has to ask for help when it doesn't make sense and go over it as needed.

not sure if that helps.
-crystal

Julie in MN
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Unread post by Julie in MN » Wed Oct 15, 2008 12:21 pm

cbollin wrote:Transition to independent learning means transition, not there yet. help as needed when needed. I plan to keep that up as long as possible.
That's been my lesson of the year for 7th grade so far. Transition, not drastic change.

Even in high school, the Hazells and other pilot kids meet together with a parent weekly to discuss their learning, as well as getting other help along the way. Our 7th & 8th graders are on that path, but they aren't there yet!

Of course, every family has different needs. And the amazing thing is -- kids know that.

Kids in large families know that more independence is needed, and I imagine they sense that they are already picking up plenty of extra from their parent(s) as their siblings are taught.

My youngest son would be in solitary confinement if he did everything alone. He's getting old enough to enjoy some independence, but he still senses that there are things to learn from his elders (mom & dad!), as well as being aware that he needs some interaction to keep alert. So we are transitioning!

P.S. Today he begged me to do math on the marker board as I read out the problems. I finally gave in but did have him write the final answer down in pencil. It gave me a good glimpse into his abilities...
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

Tracey in ME
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Unread post by Tracey in ME » Thu Oct 16, 2008 6:14 am

So, you gals KNOW the work, right? I mean, will you be able to help with Algebra, Geometry, advanced math, etc., because you KNOW it all?

That's where I am at...how much of this do I need to know...ya know? ;o)
- Tracey
Mother of six (16, 13, 9, 7, 4, and 15 months)
2006 - Present - My Father's World
2001-2005 Sonlight

Our blog: http://traceys-journal.blogspot.com/

cbollin

Unread post by cbollin » Thu Oct 16, 2008 6:36 am

Winni wrote:That's where I am at...how much of this do I need to know...ya know? ;o)
Will I be able to help in Algebra, Geometry, etc.? I don't know. Algebra, yeah, probably. Geometry -- uh, I will do one of several things:
*ask for help in local co-op, or find one of the older families what they did. Someone in this town will have the right study group at the right time. God is good at arranging that.
*more than likely though, I'll hand it over to my dh. He has several undergraduate degrees, one was in mathematics, as well as his higher degrees in chemistry and all of that.

so.... I'm not trying to plan right away for all of that.

I know that I'm not reading every single thing in the Saxon book right now. For the most part, my daughter is doing fine in the program. I use the solutions manual to help point her in the right direction to think about for herself. I know at some point I will have to look over the material in the text as she goes along. A lot of it right now comes from when we 'grade" (i.e. go over) her problem set. She's good at pointing out in the text where she is confused and doesn't get it. I'm guessing that will continue next year too???

But, I'm not the best fit answer on this since my oldest is only 7th grade. I know that my local friends have used Saxon and DIVE and don't necessarily keep up with the textbook with their kids in all subjects. They keep track of what's going on and make sure the kids understand it, but they aren't taking the course with their child, if that makes sense????

I'm curious how it worked in the hazell's house after reading something on the mfw main website about the solutions manual in those upper programs being helpful for when you don't even know where to begin :-)
mfw website on math wrote:We have successfully used Saxon Math with our older children. We add DIVE CDs so that students are more self-directed. These are excellent CDs for use on your computer that teach each lesson in the Saxon textbooks. This is especially helpful if your time is limited, or if your higher level math skills are rusty. Our older children prefer DIVE CDs to Mom's help and, since my Calculus skills are non-existent, I'm very thankful! Our son finished Saxon through Calculus with the help of DIVE CDs and scored 98% on the Math subtest of his ACT test. Be sure to purchase the Solutions Manual because it shows each problem worked out step-by-step—very helpful when your child needs help and you aren't even sure how to begin!
So, I guess I better make sure to have the solutions manual for those years :-)
-crystal

Julie in MN
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Unread post by Julie in MN » Thu Oct 16, 2008 10:06 am

cbollin wrote:So, I guess I better make sure to have the solutions manual for those years :-)
-crystal
Yes, fortunately older math courses almost always have "full answer keys" -- with the entire problem worked out, start to finish. Those not only help you see where the student went wrong, but they help the parent jump straight from the laundry basket into the thinking process of the problem.

Believe me, it was YEARS ago for me, but the most important skill has always seemed to be learning how to think through something. And being a homeschool parent helps keep up that skill!
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

MJP
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Unread post by MJP » Thu Oct 16, 2008 9:16 pm

My oldest is in 9th. We are doing Algebra 2 this year. (We skipped Geometry to solidify Algebra and will do it next year. He is young enough this schedule will not affect testing.) We use a different math program, but I watch all the video presentations with my oldest and do the practice problems (5 a day) with him to keep up on what he is doing. He does the rest of the problems on his own. This has been enough for me to keep up with him without overwhelming me. I have 7 more children that will follow so I count it a small investment now. It is already paying off as the second son is in Algebra 1. He watches the video presentations by himeself, and then we do the practice problems together. So, I am already profiting from my initial investment. I do the practice problems with him so I can see that he is doing all the steps and understanding. In history I read the material on my own and discuss it with the boys, same in Biology. So, most of the week they are working alone, but I read the material and then help them prepare for the tests by discussing it with them and seeing where there might be holes of misunderstanding or application. With the next child I should be able just to skim it to recollect the information and help them. This is what is working the best with our group as we start the high school years and higher level material. I am behind them in Spanish and that is OK with me. Hopefully, I will catch up with a later child. They are on their own with Rosetta Stone in that area.
Melissa
Wife of 1 for 18 yrs. Mom of 7--ages 1-15--1st, 2nd, 5th, 8th and 9th grades & (one on the way)
Psalm 16:8
Currently using--1850 to Modern Times
Previously--MFW K , 1st, CtoG, RTR, Exp. to 1850

Tracey in ME
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Thanks, gals...

Unread post by Tracey in ME » Fri Oct 17, 2008 7:28 am

I'm glad to hear that the solutions manual (which I already have for Saxon 8/7) will have the problems worked out.
- Tracey
Mother of six (16, 13, 9, 7, 4, and 15 months)
2006 - Present - My Father's World
2001-2005 Sonlight

Our blog: http://traceys-journal.blogspot.com/

Fly2Peace
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Saxon 8/7 How long each day???

Unread post by Fly2Peace » Thu Nov 04, 2010 4:46 pm

4littlehearts wrote:How long does your dc using this math take each day to do a whole lesson? (This is assuming that your dc is doing the whole lesson and not following the MFW lesson plans. Just trying to get a gauge to see if my dd is taking too long. Thanks!
I am curious about this. We are trying to follow MFW plans, but not having a "good" time. The switch from Singapore to Saxon seems to have really thrown dd into some kind of tailspin. She is so far behind at this point that I don't know what to do. Really. I should have already had the famous principal / teacher / student conference. So, do I push for catch up?

And, yes, how long should a lesson take? I think I remember something about 1.5 hours?? So, to catch up does that mean 3 hours a day to double up? And, sorry, not trying to hijack, but hoping others will give some thoughts on time, and such with this. Is it normal to struggle transitioning from Singapore style lessons to Saxon?
Fly2Peace (versus flying to pieces)

Julie in MN
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Re: Saxon 8/7 How long each day???

Unread post by Julie in MN » Thu Nov 04, 2010 5:04 pm

Yes, it was a culture shock to switch from Singapore, with games when we had extra time, to upper math with 50 problems a day! I will just say that upper level Singapore makes the very same transition, so there's no way out :~

I can't speak for Saxon 8/7 but I think if it's 7th grade and more than an hour, I might take a hard look at whether the student is placed too high and needs to take longer than a year to complete that level, or whether the student is placed too low in some areas of the text and needs to skip some of the problems that are making him dawdle. I just think an hour is plenty for a 7th grade math lesson, unless part of it is math drill or other mathy things, or of course if the child wants to do more. That's just my way, though. Nothing official.

By 8th grade Algebra I think a child needs to spend at least an hour a day on upper math, and that doesn't include correcting the work if the child is doing that himself. Sometimes in 8th & 9th (Alg. & Geometry), just fixing (or discussing) the corrections (after *I* corrected the work) will also take 15-30 minutes past the hour lesson. At that point, I gauge my child's mental condition. Sometimes I will just let a lesson run into the next day. Last year in Alg., my son got so behind by 1.5-day and 2-day assignments that I thought he'd go into the summer, especially since assignments tend to get harder, not easier, at the end of a year. However, I felt he was capable of finishing the book during the year, and so I kept outlining what he had left before he would "have the summer off." He actually hit the math hard at the end of the year and caught up.

Hopefully you'll get some actual 8/7 experience, too.
Julie
Last edited by Julie in MN on Thu Nov 04, 2010 5:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

cbollin

Re: Saxon 8/7 How long each day???

Unread post by cbollin » Thu Nov 04, 2010 7:07 pm

Well, this is just from the perspective of my 15 y.o looking back 2 years ago:

  • I’m in 9th now doing Geometry. Like mom said, it’s been a while, but….

    If I remember correctly, doing all 30 problems 8/7 in 7th took me about an hour a day; not counting the drill book or mental math. It’s about a 10 minute (average) DIVE lesson, plus 50 minutes of doing problems. I love math and am very good at it, but that’s still a good amount of time. Following the MFW plans, it depends on how many problems, but, on average, I would like to say it took me 60 minutes per lesson.

    As for the transition, I can’t speak for Singapore to Saxon. However, Saxon has a max of 30 problems a day, and Jacobs has 50+ problems a day. And at the start of the year, you have to do all of them. I didn’t exactly struggle (again, strong Math skills and I don’t mind having to spend more time on stuff), but it did annoy me to have to have it take soooooooooooooooooooooooo long.
(mom chiming in here: I remember the transition, kiddo… there were days that being 13 years old was enough transition all its own. Also, I remember you asking at times “can’t I just do this the Singapore way or do I haaaaave to do it this way?) There was some transition time in parts of the year and a lot of I think was more about being 13. ;)

  • And if I’m trying to catch up, I don’t bother about the time, I just do 2 (or more) lessons. Also, my math brain warms up as it goes on, so the second lesson takes less time, even if they’re about the same length. And another thing to remember, the workload gets lighter as the year goes on, even if the problems get harder. For the first few weeks of Alg. 1 (and I think 8/7), it was “do 1-30 all” every day. Then it started to get much lighter, about 20 problems average.

    @ fly2peace: It depends on how far behind she is. Also, DO NOT drop the drill book. It was extremely helpful for me. I already knew most of the stuff, but the things I didn’t (fraction-decimal-percent in particular) were important to remember
    . (oh my goodness, says Mom, you hated those pages! heee heeeee. oh I remember that now..... LOL LOL Oh F2P: you wouldn't believe some of the "transition issues". This girl, ha ha ha ha.... ok, it was when John was working from an office in our Indiana house and well... let's just say there were days she was doing math in the principal's office.) Ok, mom, yes, I remember that too, but thanks for making me do them anyway.
(huh???? you're welcome :)

Crystal’s opinion on pushing to catch up: work at a steady pace and if summer school to finish means the material is learned, that’s ok too. Part of the joy of homeschooling. But look at the reason why she is behind and adjust accordingly. If she is going slowly in a section to learn the material, that’s ok. She might need incentive to work hard, she might need some individual instruction time with you to help her go over the solutions manual. It could be other things bogging her down.

Hope some of those random thoughts from my oldest helps someone.
-crystal

4littlehearts
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Re: Saxon 8/7 How long each day???

Unread post by 4littlehearts » Thu Nov 04, 2010 11:03 pm

Thanks Julie, Crystal, and Crystal's daughter! I wasn't expecting such a lengthy reply. Thanks for taking the time to type out your experiences with me regarding Saxon 8/7. My dd is pretty quick in math, not super quick, but usually gets A's on her tests. Over the years she has struggled with some OCD tendencies and I believe that is part of the reason she is taking so long on math some days. She pretty much will tell me that she was either re-reading things (which is something she tends to do when she is in OCD mode) over and over. I am just trying to get a good gauge as to how long she really should be taking in math. The other day, when she was required to do all of the problems according to the MFW lesson plans, she took about 2 hours. I want to encourage her to go faster so that Math will not bog her down during the day and so that her day can be more productive, but I think in my impatience I tend to get frustrated with her more than I am an encouragement.

Fly2Peace
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Re: Saxon 8/7 How long each day???

Unread post by Fly2Peace » Fri Nov 05, 2010 7:38 am

Yes, thanks much to all for the helpful info. I think I need to get real with dd about why she is behind. (Which I believe is just the way she reacts to any big change, she balks, procrastinates, and so forth until it is an issue. Then generally I blow up, she cries, we work together and get her back on track, sometimes with the principals involvement, sometimes not.) So, I don't think it is because it is too hard. She is really good at math, although if you ask her she would say she is not. I may need to work on that some too, as attitude is a good portion of the overall success...
Thanks again. For the 1.5 hours I was including mental math, drill, etc. So I think we are on track for overall time per lesson.
Fly2Peace (versus flying to pieces)

cbollin

Re: Saxon 8/7 How long each day???

Unread post by cbollin » Fri Nov 05, 2010 7:48 am

Fly2Peace wrote:Yes, thanks much to all for the helpful info. I think I need to get real with dd about why she is behind. (Which I believe is just the way she reacts to any big change, she balks, procrastinates, and so forth until it is an issue. Then generally I blow up, she cries, we work together and get her back on track, sometimes with the principals involvement, sometimes not.) .
I think our girls would get along just fine! Sounds just like our house. ;) isn't parenting during these years just fun?

hang in there.... I'm finding we get along much easier these days than 2 years ago. except in the orthodontist office. LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL
they go from trying to not roll their eyes, to "can we stop at the store and get soup, it hurts...."

Homeschooling with eternal purpose can be about building relationships and lots of hugs and cups of coffee/lattes and going to Mercy Me concerts, as well as getting math done.

-crystal

cbollin

How long does it take to do a lesson in 8/7?

Unread post by cbollin » Thu Apr 19, 2012 9:32 am

deltagal wrote:I'm trying to decide about our math route for a slow thinking 13 yo boy? How much time do you spend a day on a math lesson in Saxon 8/7?
My middle gal - slow to average in stuff.
Me: not the best clock watcher in terms of "this took us X minutes"

A typical day for us in 87
*the "drill sheet" 5 minutes or less. Some days, she needed longer and it was 10 minutes. but more likely it was 5 minutes
*about 3-5 minutes for the "warm up" prior to the lesson. Those are mental math problems and one thinking problem.
It was my preference to stand there while she did those and listen for right answers.

Then, we read the lesson together and walked through the samples. We decided not to use the DIVE CD this year.
This was about 5 minutes or so on my part to read through it. maybe 10? but it has never felt long to me.
Then, she practices the "practice set" - this could take her about 10 minutes or so.
then, the problem set with the mfw plans. 45 minutes or so. If she was taking more than that, I usually came back to help move her along and encourage to finish.

also, this might shock people. eek. I let her use calculator now in 7th grade. so part of her slow down in math was the physical writing of long division and long multiplication. I watched her in Singapore and know that she knows how to do them long hand. It's time to speed it up.

so,... I'd guess on typical day, I was choosing to spend up to 20 minutes of instruction time with her. let her work for 45 minutes on problem sets.. then maybe a 10 minute session to finish up and help with problems that she was stuck on. She knows to circle a problem that she doesn't know what to do, or has questions, and we do all of those questions at the end of math time.

as the year progressed she began to want to do the lesson more on her own, so I backed off from teaching the "new concept" and being there for practice sets. I'd give her the "drill page" and start a load a laundry. Check the drill page... and then we'd do the "warm up mental math". Then, I'm back to dishes, or computer or something else :) She has even gotten to the point now, that she likes to check her work on problem sets. She's slow to average but really laid back and cool with missing things and learning from mistakes. She's just so fine and mellow.

we certainly did not feel the need to have the beginning of 7th grade be as independent as it developed into by end of year.

just my experience with my middle gal. I don't remember with oldest. She's in Alg II now.. depending on her mood and attitude.... who knows.... LOL. she's 7 lessons for the end of the book.
deltagal wrote:Thanks Crystal. This helps.

My 7th grader is making good progress now through Singapore. We are currently in 4B. I'm thinking when he finishes 5B we'll just go straight into Saxon 8/7.
my middle daughter had an easy transition from Singapore 5B into Saxon 87. She finished out 5B in summer after "6th" grade. and took a few weeks off from math, then 87. It felt like the natural place between those programs for this age.

just for random babbling here.... things introduced in 6A/6B are also introduced in 87. So... it all works out great.
for students like my oldest who did finish 6B singapore, 87 is still the starting point in 7th grade. it really is :)

-crystal
deltagal wrote:Well then we'll just be a year off the plan with an 8th grader in 8/7.

Mommyto3boys
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Re: How long does it take to do a lesson in 8/7?

Unread post by Mommyto3boys » Thu Apr 19, 2012 1:22 pm

Normally it takes my son about an hour. Recently though it has been taking him longer. He is having more brain fog days. Also, I have been having battles with him over him showing his work because he has been missing a lot of problems due to a slight error in the math. It seems he can't always remember how to correctly add, subtract, multiple, or divide when he knew his stuff cold for many years.

Debbie in NC
Mom to 3 ds (13, 10, and 7) and 1 dd (5)

deltagal
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Re: How long does it take to do a lesson in 8/7?

Unread post by deltagal » Thu Apr 19, 2012 7:53 pm

I've done a lot of digging on the board tonight and I do have a call into David Hazell, but I feel pretty confident that we should stay the course and finish 5B then move into Saxon 8/7, but in all honesty I just don't know if my son can handle that much math in one day. Even now I have to be very close when he does his math, he lacks so much confidence. It's mind boggling to me to think that he would be able to sustain an hour of math in one day whether it was all at one time or broken into smaller increments. I'm just wrestling with whether or not we should pursue another curriculum. He's a very slow processor.
With Joy!
Florence
http://awhynotblog.blogspot.com/

dd 7: MFW 1st grade
ds 10, 13, 15: ECC - maps, missionaries, and reading on Wednesdays
dd 2: ?

cbollin

Re: How long does it take to do a lesson in 8/7?

Unread post by cbollin » Thu Apr 19, 2012 8:01 pm

[Debbie:] my kiddo had a lot of brain fog today on her math test. I think she's going to have a retest.

remember too with SAxon.... it tells you in the ( ) which lesson to go back on those brain fog moments while doing problem sets.

[Florence:] My daughter (middle one)... is slow. I mean... can I be blunt and say when they did the IQ test, it was not on the high side? She was in speech and language therapy for over 6 years. people struggle to believe she is 13 when they are around her. She's not "low IQ" (or whatever the current term is for that)... but she is on the low side of average range. and it shows in everything.

Saxon has incremental small bites... it's really been nice for her.

It may not be the route you go. ((hugs)) and prayers.

Another thought.......... do not feel like you must rush to get through end of 5B and then 87 before end of 8th grade. If your child needs to start Algebra I as a 10th grader and then do a Geometry course, and then Alg 2 in 12th grade.... it's ok.

psst... I have a friend locally whose son is behind in math. They are using Singapore 1A-5B to get "pre algebra" into "algebra" for his 10th grade year this year.

Hopefully the call with David will help you know what path is going to help for your son.

-crystal

Julie in MN
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Re: How long does it take to do a lesson in 8/7?

Unread post by Julie in MN » Thu Apr 19, 2012 9:06 pm

deltagal wrote: It's mind boggling to me to think that he would be able to sustain an hour of math in one day whether it was all at one time or broken into smaller increments. I'm just wrestling with whether or not we should pursue another curriculum. He's a very slow processor.
You might be able to get by with less than an hour a day before you get to algebra, but really by the time he gets to algebra it's just going to take that long. That is, unless he is okay with working thru summers and such. Higher math just takes that long to explain the concepts, do the MANY problems, and likely do the corrections.

My son has a famous allergy to pencils and textbooks :) But now in 10th grade, he probably spends 1.5 hours a day on math. I'm sure he would like it to be shorter, but he realizes that everyone he knows, homeschooled or public schooled, is in this together. It was a transition for him in 8th grade to accept that fact, but another mom was helpful by telling him that if he didn't spend at least an hour a day by then on math, then he wasn't doing hard enough math for him. Now, two years later, he just knows that. He's taken the PSAT and PLAN (pre-ACT) and he knows what's on there.

Your son will grow a lot between now and 10th grade. Just take it one day at a time. And if all else fails, do math on the marker board :)
Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

deltagal
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Joined: Mon Feb 13, 2012 3:13 pm

Re: How long does it take to do a lesson in 8/7?

Unread post by deltagal » Fri Apr 20, 2012 5:41 am

Julie in MN wrote: Your son will grow a lot between now and 10th grade. Just take it one day at a time. And if all else fails, do math on the marker board :)
Julie
You wouldn't believe how many marker boards and markers we've gone through ....just this year. :-)
With Joy!
Florence
http://awhynotblog.blogspot.com/

dd 7: MFW 1st grade
ds 10, 13, 15: ECC - maps, missionaries, and reading on Wednesdays
dd 2: ?

TriciaMR
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Joined: Thu Sep 20, 2007 11:43 am

Need Saxon help

Unread post by TriciaMR » Wed Aug 15, 2012 10:34 am

Winkie wrote:We've followed MFW's suggestions for math all along, so we've been doing Singapore. Oldest is now in 7th so today we pulled out Saxon 87 and wow am I confused! Can someone walk me through the process of using Saxon? We have the DIVE CDs but I'm mostly confused about where to write, which book has what I'm looking for, etc. It took me several minutes of searching just to find the warm up facts practice test. Then I saw that the pages were perforated so I tore it out of the book but now I wonder if I should have left it in and have him write in the book. Then again is it better to photocopy the tests so that I have them for the next student? And MFWs lesson plans say to use 2 notebooks - do you do that? Help!
Hey Wendy,

Here's how we do a day...

1. Start with the "Warm Up" which includes those practice tests (which are in the Tests workbook). I just leave them in the book and have her work in them. I can usually check those problems (so far) with out referring to the solutions manual.

2. In fact, while my dd is spending those 5 minutes on that practice test, I skim through the lesson (in the thickest book) and jot down things on the whiteboard. Then we finish the warm-up (which is going pretty quickly these days).

3. We started out trying to use the DIVE CD to teach the lessons, but decided it is faster if we just look through the lesson together, have me explain topics, and work the the examples on the whiteboard.

4. We do have 2 notebooks - one regular notebook that I have her write some notes in - usually vocabulary terms or rules to follow. It's not much. Then, because she is dyslexic, I bought her a spiral bound graph paper notebook at Walmart and she usually does her Mixed Practice problems in there. We usually do lesson practice problems on the whiteboard, then some days I let her do Mixed Practice problems on the whiteboard, other times I make her do them in the graph paper notebook. I also don't make her do all the Mixed Practice. I look through the problems and see which ones she really needs to do.
Winkie wrote:Thanks Trish! So, they write in the book of tests but for the big fat textbook they write in a separate notebook? My ds noticed those pages were perforated too and he wanted to tear it out but I stopped him just in time.

He started listening to Lesson 1 on the DIVE CD but it was taking forever, then he told me that it said it would be 30 minutes (!) Are they all that long? I thought I read somewhere that the DIVE lessons were 5-10 min. Then we had to go to the library so I stopped him midway and he still has to finish up this afternoon.

I thought Saxon was going to be more independent, like General Science is. But it seems he will still need my involvement for the "mental math" problems and going over the lessons too?

Still feeling befuddled by the transition. :~
We don't write in the big fat textbook - I make her put those notes in her notebook.

The first few lessons on the DIVE CD are long. They do get shorter eventually, but he said on the CD that the lessons that introduce "new" topics are longer. We're on lesson 8 or 9, and the only thing new has been lines/segments/rays. Everything else has been stuff we did in Singapore. Right now were even doing adding, subtracting and multiplying fractions. I think our only new term this lesson is "Recipricol" (however you spell that). So, she'll probably only take notes on the new stuff.

I am thinking the independence thing happens more gradually. My dd is dyslexic, so I keep a close eye on her. I spend 1.5-2 hours with her in the afternoon to help her.

-Trish
Trish - Wife to Phil, Mom to Toni(18), Charlie(14), and Trent(14)
2014-2015 - AHL, CTG
2015-2016 - WHL, RTR
2016-2017 - EXP1850, US1877
2017-2018 - DE, 1850MOD
2018-2019 - College, AHL
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Winkie
Posts: 70
Joined: Tue Aug 16, 2005 10:50 pm

Re: Need Saxon help

Unread post by Winkie » Wed Aug 15, 2012 3:20 pm

Thank you. We muddled through today and he did ok. He's a strong reader so he may end up preferrIng to read the lesson over the DIVE but we'll try both to start. I like the idea of having him do all the tests & problems in a notebook so I can save the book for my next 7th grader.
~Wendy
6 boys, 1 girl + 1 long-awaited baby sister
Completed MFW from K to Graduation
2018-19 will use US1, and ECC (for the 3rd time!)

cbollin

Re: Need Saxon help

Unread post by cbollin » Wed Aug 15, 2012 3:59 pm

Winkie wrote:I like the idea of having him do all the tests & problems in a notebook so I can save the book for my next 7th grader.
I'd just buy the drill book again. It's easier on the student that way.. 20 bucks. I know.. I wanted oldest to save it for later... glad to buy it second time.. I know... sounds strange..
but...
All other problems are done on other paper.
Last edited by cbollin on Fri Aug 31, 2012 7:50 am, edited 2 times in total.

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