RTR - Weeks 17 & 18

If you are using Rome to the Reformation, please share your ideas with us.
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Marie
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RTR - Weeks 17 & 18

Unread post by Marie »

Weeks 17 & 18.
Carol Skinner
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Joined: Fri Jul 21, 2006 8:54 am

Week 18: Herb Garden ideas

Unread post by Carol Skinner »

Posted: Wed Dec 06, 2006 1:25 pm

Just wanted to let anyone know, who is interested, that Kmart has indoor herb gardens. The price is $15.99, I think by Chia. The herbs are curled parsley, dill, chives, basil, cilantro, and marjoram. It comes with 4-3in terra cotta pots and saucers and liners, growing sponges, seed packets and plant markers.

It will be hard for my girls to wait ==we are in wk15.

In Christ,
Carol
cbollin

Unread post by cbollin »

Posted: Wed Dec 06, 2006 6:55 pm

In RTR we ended up visiting our neighbor's garden. (Week 18 was in October for us that year)

But we just bought a Chia this past weekend for part of the Botany study in EX1850! So far, it's growing even in my house :)

--crystal
cbollin

Week 17: Beowolf

Unread post by cbollin »

Posted: Tue Dec 06, 2005 8:11 am

We had fun listening to a condensed reading of Beowulf. Found a book on cassette at library that had Beowulf on it, as part of a "scary tales" readings. The intro music had a nice traveling minstrel feel to it.
It is called:
Tell-tale heart, and other terrifying tales All stories adapted by Syd Lieberman ; original music by Howard Levy.

My older child got to listen to this with me, but I did make sure the younger girls were out of listening range. It wasn't very scary (for my 4th grader) but I like to err on the cautious side. Don't know if all the stories are appropriate, but just listened to Beowulf.

crystal
cbollin

Week 18: Herb garden growing activity

Unread post by cbollin »

Posted: Sat Feb 18, 2006 1:17 pm

Week 18: Herb garden growing activity.

Insect Lore (the company that makes the butterfly garden and Ant Hill from the K program) now sells a ready to grow "medieval herber" kit. (Of course the TM does give easy to follow instructions to do one on your own. just an alternative idea.)
DS4home
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Viking Runestone

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Instead of carving our names in cookie dough, we used our home made clay tablets from week 1. We have enjoyed writing on our tablets on occation and have keep them in our cubbies with the other school books. The truth is I am not a cookie baking mom (they always burn and I gave up trying!). So the clay tablets came in handy, they could still enjoy the activity of writing in runes :)

Dawn
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Julie in MN
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Re: RTR - Week 17 - Beowolf

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My son had a Jonathan Park audio about Beowolf. Well, he needed a little of the RTR lesson in order to get the whole historical connection, but he likes the JP audios & has referred to them years later.

Julie
MelissaB
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ANGLO-SAXON INVADERS

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Great website on Anglo-Saxon invaders:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/primaryhis ... ettlement/
Melissa B. (Arkansas)
Girls ages 16 & 13
Completed K, 1st, and Investigate {ECC; CTG; RTR; Expl.-1850; and 1850-Mod. Times}
"That they may teach the young women to be sober, to love their husbands, to love their children,.." Titus 2:4
Julie in MN
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RTR, Pope Gregory, Augustine (Canterbury), Ethelbert ???

Unread post by Julie in MN »

asheslawson wrote:Questions on the sources - they sort-of agree, but either don't exactly align, or have omissions. I know this is common from one source to another, but to me these were very different. What are your thoughts if you recall any of these?

Trial & Triumph discusses Pope Gregory sending Augustine (not Monica's son) & some monks to the Anglo-Saxons (Britain) as missionaries, but the monks got nervous about stories of barbarians on the way & sends Augustine back to plead with Pope Gregory not to send them. Pope Gregory doesn't cancel the mission, but firmly & compassionately urges them forward.

Story of the World tells that the pope buys some Angles as slaves, teaches & converts them & sends them back to Britain. This story discusses the Pope sending Augustine (also, not the previous one from 300's to 400's), but Story of the World doesn't mention his returning to plead for the mission to be called off, though I suppose it is just an omission?? It only tells of his landing on the shores & meeting King Ethelbert, almost warmly. Ethelbert worries @ first but appear to quickly allow him to continue his mission work. There is references at the bottom that mention several versions of this story exist. It mentions that Ethelbert is unfamiliar with christianity, although Medieval World, and Streams of Civilization mention that Ethelberts wife is already a christian.

Streams of Civilization tells the story of the slaves as a legend. It also mentions Ethelbert accepted Augustine, but it was because of his wife who is already a christian.

I know it is common for sources to vary slightly on their stories, and actually, I find that good because it offers more insight. However these border on disagreeing. Any thoughts???
You are correct that history sources differ, I think even to the point of contradicting one another. One of the issues is that some folks might believe something is a "legend" while others might look at oral history as fact. Also, the fact that the king's wife was Christian does not mean the king knew anything about Christianity, or inquired about her thoughts on running the country -- hope I'm not making too many assumptions here ?? !!

I took the easy route and looked on Wikipedia, which of course can be written by any contributor, but it has quite a lengthy article with many footnotes. The report there seems quite close to Trial & Triumph.

The Wiki page on Pope Gregory, under famous quotes and anecdotes, lists, "Non Angli, sed angeli – "They are not Angles, but angels". Aphorism, summarizing words reported to have been spoken by Gregory when he first encountered pale-skinned English boys at a slave market, sparking his dispatch of St. Augustine of Canterbury to England to convert the English, according to Bede. He said: "Well named, for they have angelic faces and ought to be co-heirs with the angels in heaven."

I do think I've heard that famous quote several times before, so I didn't do any further looking, as my guess is that is the connection between the slaves and the mission. Maybe someone has the high school church history book handy from WHL?
Julie
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asheslawson
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Re: RTR, Pope Gregory, Augustine (Canterbury), Ethelbert ???

Unread post by asheslawson »

Thanks Julie - I didn't think of checking Wikipedia. I am fascinated with the differences & contradictions in historical documentation. Sometimes I wonder how much of what we know is really all that accurate - because often 2 people can witness the same thing & report slightly or even very differently. (Loved reading Case for Christ and really digging into subtle differences in the gospels that have been argued before - but how these subtle differences were actually indicators that the story is very real...off topic - but still interesting.)

I didn't think about the fact that since Ethelbert was a king - he may have know very little about his wife's faith - I guess it's hard to imagine that some were married, but barely knew each other. So he may have known little about her faith - or been influenced by it greatly - I guess it's left for us to speculate. Either way - I love to dig into these stories & my kids & I have fun taking them apart & figuring out what other things could have been going on at the time. It's fun to know everything we can about the environment, clothes, style of homes, lifestyles, etc. so when we read we can try to imagine what this story might have been like for those who experienced it first hand! Sometimes we get so caught up imagining all of the scenarios that it's hard to get back on track & get our other work done!! Something I LOVE about homeschooling - even though I have to bring it to a close because I still want them to be able to communicate in writing & calculate some mathematical problems!!!
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MelissaB
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Re: RTR, Pope Gregory, Augustine (Canterbury), Ethelbert ???

Unread post by MelissaB »

Hi, Ashley,

We just finished Gregory, too. It's always so interesting the different ways various sources record history.
Melissa B. (Arkansas)
Girls ages 16 & 13
Completed K, 1st, and Investigate {ECC; CTG; RTR; Expl.-1850; and 1850-Mod. Times}
"That they may teach the young women to be sober, to love their husbands, to love their children,.." Titus 2:4
Julie in MN
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Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 3:44 pm
Location: Minnesota

Re: RTR, Pope Gregory, Augustine (Canterbury), Ethelbert ???

Unread post by Julie in MN »

Yes, I sometimes think the interest in and questioning of what we learn is one of the biggest thing we're teaching. Enjoy!
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002+)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs
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