Narration help

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Julie in MN
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Narration help

Unread post by Julie in MN » Fri Feb 20, 2009 1:20 pm

microcarter wrote:My 6 year old ds is just not getting the narration in 1st and we are on day 94! So a while back I started breaking the story down into smaller parts and having him tell me one part before I would read the rest. This works fairly well most days but today he was just not with it. I've never done narration before so I have nothing to compare this to. Am I doing something wrong? What can I do better or differently? Is it unusual for a 6 year old boy to struggle with this? Any suggestions would be great because I'm starting to tense up and grit my teeth every time we try to do this.
One thing I wanted to mention is that every child will be different when it comes to producing language. Some kids will readily jump in and wing it -- those kids you may have to rein in at a later time. Other kids will feel that "books" or "moms" are so perfect that they can never compete -- those kids you may be pulling things out of gradually over several years.

Now I'll back out & let the experienced 1st grade teachers give you tips on how to help your particular type of child. Oh, and more narration ideas are here:
http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php?f=19&t=500
http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php ... 559#p45243
Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
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momto6
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Re: Help With MFW 1 Narration

Unread post by momto6 » Fri Feb 20, 2009 1:33 pm

First of all I would say relax :-) . If you have a 6yo boy who is on day 94 of first, congrats to you!!! We just finished up first and my ds7 also struggled with narration. Here is the kicker... he is completely an auditory learner...go figure ?? He will easily memorize anything he hears in a song, on t.v., etc. It is almost scary how quickly and easily he does it sometimes. Anyway, with the narration, I came to the conclusion that he was bored. He had "heard all those stories before", etc. So, this is what I did:

1.I would break it up into smaller chunks if it was more than two paragraphs or so. You are already doing this and that is a great way to handle it I think ;)

2. I would try to read it before hand so I could add emphasis, voices, etc. That made it more exciting for him to listen to and he seemed to pick up more details that way. Sometimes he would do the voices too...which makes it fun.

3. If he was being lazy, in my opinion, I would tell him we would do it again if he didn't hear me the first time...that usually jogged his memory right away :-)

4. If I felt he was listening and just needed some help, I would ask him questions like: What happened next? Before that? Who did that?

HTH some

Becky in MI
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cbollin

Re: Help With MFW 1 Narration

Unread post by cbollin » Fri Feb 20, 2009 8:11 pm

Here are some more ideas:

1. Relax.

2. Ask the WH questions ahead of time (that means Who, what, where, why,when) and tell him to try to listen for the answer for them in the reading. Emphasis on TRY, you see, he is only 6. Mastery is not expected right now, is it? You'll be doing lots of narration for a long time.

3. by all means, help your son to learn how to look back in the reading material to be able to answer questions. Draw his attention to a key word in the sentence that answers your question.

4. keep a simple list of narration questions written out so he can look and be prepared.

5. Model the correct answers for him a few times. Just like Julie said, kids develop at different rates. Try giving out loud multiple choices of possible correct answers, as well as a "no, that's not it" answer.

-crystal

erin.kate
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1st grade narration question

Unread post by erin.kate » Wed Apr 13, 2011 11:14 am

kacairo1 wrote:My daughter is dictating lengthy narration summaries for her bible notebook--a wonderful comprehension skill. Today's narration was 10 long sentences. She's so proud of them, however it is becoming too much to write for her bible notebook. Any suggestions as to how to handle "cutting back" her narrations for the purpose of writing?
After my daughter, 7, narrates the story and reads from her reader, I have her choose her two or three most favorite parts of the story that touched her heart and that were meaningful. We then craft that into two or three sentences for the notebook.

That might help whittle it down. :-)
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Re: 1st grade narration question

Unread post by Cyndi (AZ) » Wed Apr 13, 2011 12:55 pm

Our story: When my dd started doing that, I wrote down everything she said, then showed her how to fiercely edit it. It was a little uncomfortable for both of us, but we managed to do it without tears. After several times of leading her through how to get 2-3 quality sentences with key points, she condensed her summaries on her own. Note: sometimes what was "key" to her was different than what was "key" to me and I just had to let her go with it.
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Julie in MN
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Re: 1st grade narration question

Unread post by Julie in MN » Wed Apr 13, 2011 2:25 pm

We didn't do MFW-1 ;( but there were times over the years (such as ECC 1st ed. science pages in 3rd grade) when I scribed for my son. I might have him write the title himself, draw the picture, and then dictate to me what to write. I'd write smaller and use the top of the dotted line separate from the bottom of the dotted line, so I could fit quite a bit even on the pages we were using for science, with a blank half and a few lines printed underneath.

I always seemed to want my son to give more details.

Julie
P.S. More ideas might be here: http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php?f=19&t=500
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
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gratitude
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Re: 1st grade narration question

Unread post by gratitude » Wed Apr 13, 2011 4:25 pm

You bring up a question I have had since we finished MFW Grade 1. Which is more important to learn narration or summary? Comprehension, sometimes extensive comprehension, or being able to narrow it down to key points? I still haven't figured out the answers to those questions. I have been thinking on it since we finished MFW 1 in December. I can find points and reasons for both sides.

When I read I can scan for information I need. Is this a skill developed from comprehension questions, narration, or summary? Then there is reading with an attempt to understand all the given information. This seems more like narration, extensive narration, to me.

So I gave you more questions than answers, sorry.

I will share what I did as well. I let him narrate. It was very extensive. He often re-wrote the Bible stories from Marie with his own words orally. He did dictate his narrations to me, and I would write them down. They would cover the lines on the front sheet and the back with small writing. Only once did it need an additional sheet. The pro of this method I think was the fact that he really retained and learned the Bible stories in chronological order. The draw back was that his handwriting needs a lot of work and it would have been a good opportunity to work on handwriting and summary. I have read that children integrate information when they write it down. I think this can be true; it is very true for me. I would say with this particular son though that he has always processed information through talking. So narration was a good fit. For my second son I think I would have him write it. I don't know yet, but it wouldn't surprise me at all if he process information through writing.

O.K. back to see how legos are going...

Dusenkids
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Re: 1st grade narration question

Unread post by Dusenkids » Wed Apr 13, 2011 6:20 pm

Both skills are really important in my opinion. My son wants his stories to go on for ever. If we writing yet, I am sure he would write a book. When he is tell me his stories, there are times when I say "I'm in the middle of... Can you give me the short version? But then I give him time later to tell me his detailed stories.

I would do the same with writing. If the assignment is a short summary, then it needs to be a short summary. Give her time later to write her detailed story about something else. Or maybe a detailed story on Monday and the others are short. Or something like that. Several good ideas on here. I am sure you will find something that works for the two of you. Excited writers, got to love it!
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kacairo1
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Re: 1st grade narration question

Unread post by kacairo1 » Wed Apr 13, 2011 8:02 pm

Thank you to everyone for your suggestions! I think I'm going to continue to be the scribe for her narrations so that she feels her summaries are valid, but then tell her we need to narrow it down to 4-5 sentences for her notebook. Then, if she wants to add more further she can do that during her "free time."
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Julie in MN
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Am I doing this right?

Unread post by Julie in MN » Thu Jul 24, 2014 9:34 am

bethinga wrote:I'm not sure if I'm doing narration correctly. We are one Bible story from the end of 1st grade. My son is 7 1/2. All year, narration has been a struggle.

He reads the Bible story to me from his reader. I ask him to tell me what happened. He's silent. I ask again and he mumbles, "I don't know," or "I can't explain." I ask questions to be sure he's comprehending what he's reading (he comprehends just fine if it's NOT a bible story). His answers (mumbled) indicate he understands perfectly. I ask him to illustrate in his Bible notebook. He gives it minimal effort, although sometimes he really gets into it. I ask him to tell me one sentence about what happened in the story, so he might write it. After more mumbling and acting tired, he tells me a sentence or two. I change it a bit so it's not too long, or help fill in details where he's vague. I then either write it lightly and let him trace it, or write it for myself and dictate it to him word-for-word. He writes it reluctantly and with great distraction. Candy awaiting him at the end helps, but I hate using candy as a bribe. At the beginning of the year, I admit, I may have expected too much. Over the course of the year, I've lightened up. When it becomes too cumbersome for him, I have him copy a sentence from the Bible Reader instead.

I read some of Charlotte Mason's notes on narration where she describes narration as something kids naturally do. Yes, this is true for him, IF it's about Pokemon, or his best friend, or a Lego creation he made, or a cool bird he saw. He can narrate if it's a book he enjoys, a movie, or something that happened to him. But if it's about what he learned in Sunday School, or what his Bible Reader story was about....I get reluctance and mumbling. I think I'm dealing with two issues here. 1) He appreciates the seriousness of spiritual issues and is reluctant to talk about them (big feelings in this kid), and 2) He doesn't like writing anything that's not his idea.

We enjoyed first grade. I wouldn't trade the Biblical teaching, for sure. But, I'm concerned about 2nd since there's more writing and narration. I'm trying to keep things light and give him lots of praise. But I'm not even sure I'm approaching this right, or even in a truly CM way. I had another CM friend tell me age 7 is too young for writing sentences. Should I be doing this differently?
Well, I like to avoid being a board hog but let's get the conversation going!

My main thought when reading your description is that you are very attuned to your child's strengths and weaknesses and that is the best gift you can offer him. We each have our own areas that, for our own reasons, are not areas we are satisfied with or doing our best. We need to work on them without chastising ourselves so much that we crush our efforts altogether. And the same for our children.

Each of my children is a very different writer. And despite working on writing a lot (even with my public schoolers), they did not all meld into the same writers. I've found it interesting, actually. When I brought my middle dd home to school, she agonized over each word, wanted her Bible notebook pages to be lovely and perfect (she was a high schooler), didn't need much editing, but did need to be pushed (hard) to actually make her writing "her own." After I got into a rhythm working with her, I brought my youngest home to school and he was the exact opposite - tons of his own thoughts, fun, but very random, few facts remembered correctly, tons of editing needed, and famously despised the pencil (he typed a lot, sometimes I scribed for him).

My grandson is working on the Bible notebook as an "afterschooler." I am very casual with him, and he can write a couple of words summarizing the "title" of the event, or whatever he wants to write. It seems natural for him to not leave the lines blank but other than that he comes up with different things. Despite public school (and summer school), his spelling is pretty bad, although usually I can figure out a reason why he made the choices he did. I realize you will feel more responsible as your child's primary teacher, but I used to "publish" books for public school kids as a volunteer and not many were written all that well, plus I've had a few kids grow up now, which helps give me perspective on age 7 ;)

Probably my main goals in writing over the years have been that the student always "does something" and that he remain open to "talking & learning" all the time (including discussing something I think would be helpful in the writing). I like the talk by the Writing Strands author in the recording at the bottom of this page, especially starting around 40 minutes with the analogy about making pies and criticizing everything -or- not even tasting it at all, which is equally disheartening (that part is at about 11.5 minutes on the recording). https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eLMddsrILtA I admit, it's easier for me to follow that advice with my grandson than it was with my kids ;)

I LOVE the Bible dgs is getting in at my house. To me, the Bible lessons are the focus and the writing is secondary. YMMV.

Hopefully you'll hear from more moms teaching 1st full-time.
Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
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lea_lpz
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Re: Am I doing this right?

Unread post by lea_lpz » Thu Jul 24, 2014 11:11 am

I am going to offer a different perspective, primarily because you say he's capable of doing narration in other areas.

I think maybe you are over helping him. Sometimes when I helped dd with math or writing I noticed she tended to have this glazed over look and checked out. Same thing with my stepson. When I notice that they checked out and are no longer really listening, I tell them "I can help you but I won't do the work for you and think for you because I already know how to write (do addition, etc.), and you don't (or are leaning, etc)." Then I make them do it on their own do it on their own for a bit so they can re-engage / struggle a bit. I'll offer them help again about 5-10 min later but let them know I can help but they need to their part by listening / focusing on what I am saying or showing them. I avoid giving them an answer but instead try to shot for asking questions to help them get to the answer. Sometimes they surprise me and get it without needing help. In fact when I started doing this with dd she started being able to write her whole Bible notebook narration on her own and basically I edit it, helping her correct on average maybe 5 errors.

I would encourage you not to over correct, jump in as soon as they struggle and try to be aware if when you begin to do the work for them. I remember my mom doing that when I was little and it made me not really try harder, mentally check out and I felt inadequate and stupid. I thought I couldn't do it on my own.

On another note, if its a disobedience issue, what I do when my kids decides to be pokey when I give them an assignment is move on at predetermined cut off time and explain to them that the assignment should have taken this long and I gave you a reasonable amount of time to do it so now you will be responsible for finishing it during your free time. So when they normally would get to play outside, in room, screen time, etc., I bring out the unfinished school work. Yesterday my dss was pokey in math. It took him over an hour to complete 1 math sheet. I explained that I assigned an hour total and that since he didn't finish an hour because he chose to be pokey, he'd have to be responsible for finishing it still. He had to sit out at the public pool when we went for Rex time when until he was done. It only took him 15 to finish the second math page and 20 min to do his language arts assignment because he had a string motivating factor. Sometimes it's got to hurt a little for then to get it, kwim?
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bethinga
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Re: Am I doing this right?

Unread post by bethinga » Fri Jul 25, 2014 12:50 pm

For the sake of others who might also have kids reluctant to narrate or write, I've been researching ideas, and here's what I've come up with.

Seems many CMers use narration this way:

1) Ask the young child specific questions and require them to answer in complete sentences. Don't get picky about details, just demonstrate a complete sentence for them if they have trouble, and look for signs that they understand the story. The key here that's different from how the MFW TM explains it is to ask them specific questions, instead of "tell me what happened".

2) For the visual learner, ask them to draw a picture immediately after the story, before asking them to narrate. Then, ask them to tell you about their picture in complete sentences. These sentences should reveal what they remember most about the story. Count this as narration.

2b) If the child is a kinesthetic learner, have them act out the story with costumes, stuffed animals, or even legos. These ideas also work for visual learners.

3) Use ONE of their complete sentences for copy work. It may be helpful to ask them what one thing stands out to them most in the story. Copy work can then be done in a couple of different ways:
a- Write their sentence on a blank sheet of notebook paper and let them copy it onto their page.
b -Write their sentence on their paper, leaving blank lines underneath each line, so they can write their copy directly underneath.

Step 2 was a huge light bulb for me!! This explains why he enjoys the stories, and the illustrations, but balks at narration. He can't narrate until he's visualized the story first. I will try it this way for 2nd grade. I think 2b will work great for my daughter when she's in first grade. She loves acting things out!

I also think 3b will help him stay on track with his writing. Although, I wonder if there's a website where I could print it out this way? I wish MFW would print it this way in the student sheets for the Proverbs. I think it's really hard for some kids this age to keep track of what they're writing if they're having to look back and forth. It's also been a little bit difficult for my son to write his Proverb because it's centered on the page instead of starting at top left and progressing to the end of each line. He's visual and gets hung up on these details. Even after he knew he could start at left on his page, instead of center, it still slows him down to concentrate on doing this.
Last edited by bethinga on Fri Jul 25, 2014 1:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Beth in GA
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bethinga
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Re: Am I doing this right?

Unread post by bethinga » Fri Jul 25, 2014 1:10 pm

I'm a visual learner, so it helps me to get it straight in my head by typing it here!! Lol

One thing my dh mentioned when I told him my findings were that he is a bullet-point thinker. He thinks faster than he can write, and often slowing down enough to write complete sentences can be frustrating. He suggested asking the child for bullet point facts (Who was the main character? What was the setting? Requiring answers in complete sentences, so as to stay on track with correct narration). And then choose one of these sentences for copywork.
Beth in GA
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Julie in MN
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Re: Am I doing this right?

Unread post by Julie in MN » Fri Jul 25, 2014 3:14 pm

I love it when folks share ideas. Thanks for doing the research and helping everyone else!

I did want to clarify one thing in case others mis-understand. About this part:
bethinga wrote:Seems many CMers use narration this way:
1) Ask the young child specific questions and require them to answer in complete sentences.
The key for others to notice is you said "many CMers use narration this way" and not that this is the way Charlotte Mason taught narration. Of course, we know our children best, and no one theory of education will fit every child, but here's a quote from CM Vol. 1 (posted on the Simply CM website):
Q: When I ask questions about what we read, my child doesn’t know the answer. What should I do?
A: “Direct questions on the subject-matter of what a child has read are always a mistake. Let him narrate what he has read, or some part of it” (Vol. 1, p. 228).
As for asking things like setting, that's a little more borderline because the answers aren't just being parroted back from the text, but still I think CM would engage in more personal conversation rather than analysis.

Narration is a very hard skill for those of us educated in public schools to wrap our brains around, and even our kids who are not molded yet will usually lean towards the easy road of answering specific questions if we don't act like little Ms. Masons with a lot of enthusiasm. She also goes along very slowly, usually narrating after each paragraph. She did almost no correcting of facts (nor I suspect their grammar), but poured her enthusiasm into carrying things over from other subjects or other readings, or noticing things that apply to ourselves. I think the goal is for kids to "own" the content and to avoid teaching them to listen for specific things.

One thing to remind ourselves is that in a CM classroom, students might only answer on occasion, and if they were wrong the next child might answer or other children might chime in and correct the information. It would probably be unusual if our kids were correct all the time.

Hope that doesn't take away from the great ideas. It's fine to try asking direct questions, but just to clarify that your TM is explaining a true CM technique.

Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
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Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
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Cici
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Re: Am I doing this right?

Unread post by Cici » Fri Jul 25, 2014 3:48 pm

Great ideas. Although my daughter narrates well, I struggle at times to stay quiet long enough...
Julie in MN wrote:One thing to remind ourselves is that in a CM classroom, students might only answer on occasion, and if they were wrong the next child might answer or other children might chime in and correct the information. It would probably be unusual if our kids were correct all the time.
Thank you, Julie! Sometimes our perfectionist ways allow us to forget that we're teaching children, well, I know I forget at times... Thanks for the reminder :)
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Yodergoat
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Re: Am I doing this right?

Unread post by Yodergoat » Fri Jul 25, 2014 5:03 pm

Cici wrote: Sometimes our perfectionist ways allow us to forget that we're teaching children, well, I know I forget at times... Thanks for the reminder :)
I also often forget that I'm teaching a child and should expect a child's understanding of what was read. My own daughter has a smashingly big vocabulary, probably because as an only, homeschooled child she spends so much time listening to adults... and nerdy ones at that. ;) But just because she uses "big words" doesn't mean that she has "big understanding," and I must remind myself of this almost daily.

When I do remember to do narration, I am often underwhelmed by what she retained from the story because I am unrealistically expecting her to give an adult answer. That is, until I remember that she is only 8. Time and time again I am brought crashing back to earth when I hear her say something childish and simplistic... like the day she was watching The Adventures of Milo and Otis and asked, with complete seriousness, if it was a true story. :~ Reality check time... oh, yeah, she is a little kid! Don't expect so much out of her, Momma! I need reminders of just this very thing every day... I am teaching a child, one who thinks like a child and reasons like a child. So thanks for another reminder!

One thing I was thinking about in bethinga's original post is that her son was hesitant about narrating Bible accounts. Now, I was not exposed to the Bible as a child, but if I had been and if I had been taught that it was the true and inerrant word of God, then I would have had trouble narrating it back also. For me, it would have been fear of "getting something wrong" about a subject that was so important and crucial. When we did the Bible Notebook in First, my daughter gave very long narrations because she didn't want to leave anything out due of its import. She might just have easily said very little, afraid to even try because it is such a serious subject. I must remember that whenever we are teaching things of such a deep spiritual nature (and especially if the child knows we are hoping for a good spiritual answer), the reactions of the child will be different than when he or she is recounting a regular story. Just a thought!
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bethinga
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Re: Am I doing this right?

Unread post by bethinga » Fri Jul 25, 2014 5:28 pm

Julie in MN wrote:Q: When I ask questions about what we read, my child doesn’t know the answer. What should I do?
A: “Direct questions on the subject-matter of what a child has read are always a mistake. Let him narrate what he has read, or some part of it” (Vol. 1, p. 228).
Julie- Thanks so much for this. It's direct CM quotes I was looking for, and I didn't find this one, so I'm really glad you posted it here. I wonder what the full answer was, though, because that doesn't answer the whole question. My child simply won't narrate. I can't think of another way to get it out of him other than to ask questions.

Yondergoat- That brings me back around to my original suspicions that he's just very sensitive to Bible/spiritual matters. (He's also a kid who wouldn't pray with us until he was about 6, and still won't make up his own prayer. Prefers a poem-like prayer he can repeat. BUT, reminds us if we skip it! :) ) I will see if he narrates better with a non-Biblical story.

Although, if he can draw a picture first, and in telling me about the picture ends up narrating about the story....problem solved. We'll see. ;) I'm looking very forward to 2nd grade, but also nervous bc I don't want narration and writing to be the struggle it was this year.
Beth in GA
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Using MFW since 2012

TriciaMR
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Re: Am I doing this right?

Unread post by TriciaMR » Fri Jul 25, 2014 5:46 pm

For your number 3b - I use StartWrite software to type up the copywork, leaving blank lines below, for them to copy until they can copy from a block at the top to the lines below. For my two dyslexic kids, this was tremendously helpful.

Perhaps tighter open-ended questions rather than the broad, "Tell me what happened." Maybe starting with, "What is the first thing you remember from the reading?"

Or, maybe you tell the first thing and then he tells the second thing and go back and forth... So, you might say something like, "Caesar called for a census. So, what did Joseph and Mary do? <pause for answer> There was no room for them in the inn, right? How do you think that made them feel? <Pause for answer> What did they do to solve their problem? "

I agree with also stopping after each paragraph for narration, not waiting until the end.

But it could be the topic matter if he is very sensitive.
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bethinga
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Re: Am I doing this right?

Unread post by bethinga » Fri Jul 25, 2014 7:19 pm

Thanks, Trish, for that resource. And thanks for the suggestion of using open-ended questions. It makes me feel like questions really will be okay. I read CMs words about no questions, and my brain feels stuck. Because if the drawing thing doesn't work, I'm back at square one, all year long.
Beth in GA
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Using MFW since 2012

TriciaMR
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Re: Am I doing this right?

Unread post by TriciaMR » Fri Jul 25, 2014 7:23 pm

I think I asked questions until they really got the hang of it, or if they got stuck. Often they could start a narration, but would forget or get stuck. A quick question worded wth the next thing often helped, and then they could finish.
Trish - Wife to Phil, Mom to Toni(18), Charlie(14), and Trent(14)
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bethinga
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Re: Am I doing this right?

Unread post by bethinga » Fri Jul 25, 2014 8:12 pm

I'm also running into CMers who say the child should only be writing excellent works at this age, not his own words. I wonder if he feels intimidated to narrate, knowing that whatever he says, he'll then have to write. I may have him just write a sentence from the passage itself. Narrating from his own reading also seems different than narrating after something I've read aloud to him. Maybe it's too difficult at this age to concentrate on reading and narration together.
Beth in GA
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Using MFW since 2012

disneymommy
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Re: Am I doing this right?

Unread post by disneymommy » Tue Jul 29, 2014 9:09 pm

I had two thoughts when I read your post. The first was about timing. I know my 9 year old hated writing (IEW). I finally realized she was doing it last each day. It was challenging for her and she had already used so much mental energy. Also, it was something she really needed to do thoughtfully and carefully, but that was hard when she knew she had the rest of the day off as soon as she was done. My 7 year old needs to ease into school and doesn't do well with something that requires a lot of focus first thing in the morning. If you've been doing Bible at the same time every day, I wonder if changing the time might help?

Second, with narration, it's HARD! I went to a local CM training and we sat and listened to an article written by Charlotte Mason and were asked to narrate. If I were graded on it, I absolutely would have failed! Hearing it rather than reading it yourself makes it much harder. So when we are reading aloud to our kids, we have to remember they are only hearing. We are hearing, seeing and speaking! Also, The content of what I was read was more difficult to comprehend and retain. When we read stories or books to our kids, it's at tier level and seem very straightforward to is as adults. I have to remember they are children and won't grasp things in the same way an adult would.

bethinga
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Re: Am I doing this right?

Unread post by bethinga » Thu Jul 31, 2014 9:19 pm

Thanks, that's great insight! I've moved writing around trying to find that sweet spot in the day, to no avail.

It IS hard to narrate! I tried myself after a long passage. Crickets in my head!

This week with wk 1 of Adv, I've been asking fir narration after every few sentences. I thought he'd hate it, but he does well! I also used a quote from the text as his writing, and he wrote each line under one of my lines. He didn't complain one bit. :D

Yet, when we discussed a hymn today, he was rolling around all over the couch, mumbling, and saying "I don't know." I think my original suspicious were correct. Spiritual talk is heavy for him. But, he does seem to "get it". I think he actually gets it more than he can handle at this age. Which is a pretty good reason. <3
Beth in GA
Mom to a boy and a girl
Using MFW since 2012

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