Book basket vs. Reading time

My Father's World uses a Book Basket method to develop a love of learning and enrich all subjects; Independent Reading Time has different goals and methods but there is overlap in book lists and helpful hints
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TriciaMR
Posts: 999
Joined: Thu Sep 20, 2007 11:43 am

Book basket vs. Reading time

Unread post by TriciaMR » Sat Jun 13, 2009 12:33 pm

mommyto4 wrote: This past year we have used MFW Adventures which we all loved! My children really thrived with the hands-on and notebook pages. My only concern is that I don't really see the "love for reading"... particularly with regards to the readers. My dc love the book basket, but they don't read the books cover to cover. My dd reads different parts of the books, but I think my ds really only looks at the pictures. I am concerned that they aren't learning to love reading good books.

How do you address this issue with your dc? Do you have them read entire books? How do you go about choosing them, assigning them ... asking comprehension questions? For some reason, I seem to be really hung up on this issue and can't seem to think through a solution... Any suggestions, please? Thank you!
There are lists in the back of the manuals of "classic" books by grade level that you could have your children read to you, and then have them narrate back for comprehension check. Or, just ask the who, what, when, where, why, and how questions. (Who was the main character? What was the biggest problem he/she over came? When did x happen, before or after y? Why did he/she do x? How did he/she get to that place?)

For book basket, I just let her browse the books. Some she reads, some she doesn't. Some I read, because I'm curious. The idea there is to just enjoy what is there. Like going to the doctors office and browsing the magazines. You might read an article, you might just look at the ads, whatever.

-Trish
Trish - Wife to Phil, Mom to Toni(18), Charlie(14), and Trent(14)
2014-2015 - AHL, CTG
2015-2016 - WHL, RTR
2016-2017 - EXP1850, US1877
2017-2018 - DE, 1850MOD
2018-2019 - College, AHL
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cbollin

Re: Love for reading?

Unread post by cbollin » Sat Jun 13, 2009 12:59 pm

mommyto4 wrote: For some reason, I seem to be really hung up on this issue and can't seem to think through a solution... Any suggestions, please? Thank you!
I don't think there is a problem.
Your child probably knows what he likes and if he is allowed to select from a wide variety of books in basket, he'll find the ones he likes and will have the freedom to set aside stuff that he doesn't like. Then they'll ask for more of what they like and you have the freedom to get that style of book while still providing a wide variety because their tastes might change.

Part of the process of learning to love to read is letting a child enjoy the book and look at the pictures while they are young.
Part of the process is letting them put down stuff that they don't wanna finish. You and I do that, so it's ok to let a kid taste a small portion of a book and put it back. That's the joy of libraries - you get to send it back even if you don't finish! And lots of adults do that in libraries and book stores. They might take the book over to the coffee shop and just read parts of a book and put it back. They are enjoying reading. If it is really good, they'll finish it, probably.
Part of the process is even letting them re-read favorite books if they want to. So, it's ok if a 9,7 year old read a book below grade level :)

Nothing like being told "this is a really good and you have to finish it and you have to like it" - to make someone not like a really good book. :) been there with me! I was a top student in school and hated all of the stuff that the teachers said I was "supposed to like" and "had" to finish. I liked other stuff. Did my work though.

sounds like you're doing it right. Good job! Taking an informal more relaxed approach on this part of reading can and does work. Then there are going to be kid that no matter what you do, may not like to read on their own for a long time. there are kids like that. But you keep giving them books to look through and enjoy and take the pressure off from having to like it. Help them finish their work though.

Read out loud to your children and enjoy the time together. That's the read alouds in MFW. That's how they begin to have more fun with books, in my opinion, is when mom or dad enjoy a book with them. Even though we do our MFW read alouds, want a secret? I consider all of that optional so I don't ruin it by calling it "school time" and then let myself get in check box mode. Keeps it fun with the kids too.


Reading Comprehension is a different aspect of all of the reading in MFW, but my answer isn't much different from Trish's.
I use narration techniques. At this age (9 and 7 in your case) I simply make sure they can tell me what happened, and tell it in the right order, who is in the story, when it happens, and ask them if they like it or not and why. Then, I have them read out loud to me. That's where I really check for comprehension and vocab. Can they read it to me and talk about it at the end of a page or paragraph? Sometimes, I'll even grab a longer book from basket and read it to my kids even when it isn't "scheduled" in the manual.

Also, in PLL and ILL, there is reading comprehension as part of the language arts.

So in MFW you have
time to let kids explore book on their own in their own way with no pressure (book basket)
time to enjoy reading out loud
time to work in small ways on making sure the skills of reading comprehension are there

It all combines and you don't have to do all parts of all of those things with each and every book either.
-crystal

Fenni
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Re: Love for reading?

Unread post by Fenni » Sat Jun 13, 2009 4:04 pm

The other ladies had great answers. I just wanted to chime in and say that I really felt that the book basket in ADV was what really turned my child on to independent reading and a love for books! I feel such gratitude towards MFW for that. I'm not sure how old your son is, maybe it is an age or interest thing. I did do more "hand holding" with book basket in the beginning of the year than I did in the end.

dhudson
Posts: 320
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Re: Love for reading?

Unread post by dhudson » Sat Jun 13, 2009 11:51 pm

Have you looked in the back of the TM for the suggested reading list per grade? I have mine work through the list, one at a time ;) , but I have to say that having lots of books in the book basket has been great for my kids. As soon as we get home from the library they all vanish for an hour or two. :-) I love library day mostly because I sit down and read too.

We also have a "book basket" on each level of our home so that the books are readily available. I found some nice leather baskets at Hobby Lobby that match our decor (so I don't mind seeing them everywhere). My kids can't help but read! We also allow our kids to stay up 30 min later if they are in bed and reading. This has been a great way to encourage reading.
God Bless,
Dawn
http://www.shiningexamples.blogspot.com
blessed Mom of three - 16, 13 & 13
happy user of MFW since 2002

kellybell
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Re: Love for reading?

Unread post by kellybell » Sun Jun 14, 2009 7:45 am

We're homeschooling our 4 dc (ages 8 to turning 15 next week) and I must say that this "love of reading" develops at different ages and to different extents. If a child has a real "love of art" then perhaps that crowds out the available time for love of reading. If a certain child would rather be on the trampoline or hiking than curled up with a book, then the love of reading in that child would be not as obvious. My oldest's idea of a great day would be one curled up with a book and a cup of tea. My next oldest loves to read but does less of it because she'd rather be practicing her softball skills, riding her bike, or playing with our pet. She is a much more social child than her older sister. She'll read books her friends recommend so that they have something to talk about when they visit.

My only boy likes to fiddle with construction toys and he'd rather play outside too, but he LIKES to read. He also sees books as tools to get things done. He entered a Science Olympiad tournament and his main event was Amphibians and Reptiles. He had to answer general questions about these critters as well as look at pictures and specifically identify what critter that was. He got that information mainly from books that he devoured. And he did well, placing second in the state competition in this event, going up against kids that were a bit older than him (he's 10 and the competition was for middle schoolers but the rules don't prohibit fourth graders!). Does he have a love of reading? Well, maybe, but not as developed as I'd like it to be. He chooses books to read on his own, but they are almost always from that Mike Myers series "My Life as a ..." which are silly boy humor but clean.

My youngest, an 8 yo wiggly girl, doesn't have a love of reading. She is fine with me reading a good book to her and she'll read a book to me if I ask her to, but she doesn't choose reading as an activity to fill some empty time. She'd rather paint, swing, get out the pets, etc. But, she's young, and she doesn't have her phonics down pat. The eye doctor says she has slight visual issues. So, reading isn't easy for her and she doesn't love it. However, she's only 8 and has lots of growing ahead of her.

As homeschoolers we need to be careful not to expect each of our children to excel in each area. We all know homeschoolers that have, by about age 12, read 100s of "great books," and choose to spend their free time (after doing their chores, doing their Bible time, handling their own laundry, and shoveling the widow's sidewalk) with a classic book that most of us don't tackle until college. It is obvious such a brilliant child loves to read. Most homeschoolers are not like that. Some simply love to read but choose to do other things in most of their free time.

Each child comes to this love of reading at the right time for that child. And each child's love of reading is to a different degree.
Kelly, wife to Jim since 1988, mom to Jamie (a girl, 1994), Mary (1996), Brian (1998) and Stephanie (2001).

cbollin

ECC book basket

Unread post by cbollin » Fri Aug 28, 2009 9:42 pm

RobinF wrote:We did our first week of ECC this week and I am struggling with the book basket recommendations. Do they change in the new TM? I am just finding that they are more on the level of our K for me to read them aloud than for our 4th grader.

We read There is a Map in My lap (which wasn't recommended), People, How to make an apple pie and see the world and Katy and the Big Snow (also not recommended but saw it mentioned else where). All of these are pretty far below my 4th grader's reading level. So I am just wondering if I am missing something here. Or are there some lists of more chapter type books for the book basket? Help?

Thanks
Robin
There are several goals to work with in book basket:
learning independently
reading on their own
enjoying a book without it having to be hard
extra reading.

to that end, you'll find some books are easy, some are spot on, some are harder. Especially in ECC, you'll find a lot of books that will be easy to read for 4th graders as one of the other things with book basket is to introduce stories from a specific area and that is accomplished with stories. (even in my daughter's Russian class they listened to younger stories to enjoy it and get a feel for culture, so it is my opinion that MFW does something similar too.) Now, there are chapter books too. don't get me wrong even though I can't write worth anything on the internet anymore.

Well, the first week or so of school is a good time to ease back into school time. So, if some of the reading material for the intro weeks is lighter, it might mean that more books are covered for the 4th grader. Or you might be able to say "alright..... training time for making sure book basket gets covered on a daily basis." Again, I'm just saying my perspective of how I do it. You might do it differently.

Take a look in weeks 3-8: you'll start to see a wider variety of books by then. You'll get long and harder information books for each country. You'll get cookbooks. You get fiction. Some of the fiction will be sit down and complete in one sitting, others will be longer to complete if they want to. There are going to be some books that are in the younger picture book style.

For instance, my oldest was in 7th grade last year and told me over and over "mom! these books are so much fun to read. {Re: American Girl historical fiction books] so, it might be ok to let the kids who are older enjoy some of those books. My oldest (age 13 -- reads a lot and has always read above her age/grade level) and she really really enjoyed the books last year.

-crystal
Last edited by cbollin on Tue Sep 01, 2009 6:19 am, edited 2 times in total.

Julie in MN
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Re: ECC book basket

Unread post by Julie in MN » Fri Aug 28, 2009 11:52 pm

RobinF wrote: I think one of the problems may be that I have a book lover and he is constantly craving something new (and even challenging) to read. I would love to keep his interest with stories geared to fit the curriculum but alot of what I have looked at isn't going to fit the bill (for him at least). We are voracious (like that big word :-) ) readers and so that is part of the problem. The other part of the problem is he isn't going to read anything remotely girly (thinking Anne of Green Gables). I am actually thinking of looking into the expansion pack for 7th-8th graders and maybe letting him read those with one of us (to make sure he understands the content) but then I am still stuck on what to have him read during book basket time.

This week I just did books as read alouds with all three boys and that was fine. If I had told him to pick from the book basket he would have done it but it would have been a chore for him and I don't want that when it comes to reading. So instead he started one of the chapter books I picked up that deals with Texas history. Any specific titles to look for would be greatly appreciated. Any other advice is appreciated too.
Hi Robin,
I wasn't blessed with a single voracious reader in my bunch, but as a reader myself, here are some ideas:

1. This book basket thread has some suggestions: http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php?f=30&t=2539

2. The ECC Ideas Board also has suggestions throughout: http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewforum.php?f=15

3. In the back of all MFW manuals, there is a list for "General Reading." Many classics are there.

4. For general geography, I love the two books I have called Families of the World. They are a step up from books like Children Just Like Me. They have many photos but also describe details of families around the world, down to what time they wake up in the morning.

5. Don't underestimate the reading level of "fairy tales." I know these are popular with the preschool set, but original fairy tales were often written for a bit older children, and have mature topics related to the dangers of the world. By 4th grade, your son (like mine) will probably see the moral within them and may enjoy comparing different versions of the same story, or different stories across continents.

6. I love your suggestion of checking out the 7th-8th grade supplement, especially since your 4th grader probably won't cycle back to ECC later. One problem may be that his maturity level may not be at the same place as his reading level, so you might need to read along with him at first to confirm that these are okay with him. Or at least read through the first two YWAM biographies to get him used to the variety of mission experiences (Cameron had a long life and Nate had a very short one), with the ECC helps in understanding how God can use tragedies.

7. YWAM has many, many biographies beyond the 6 used in ECC (and the 4 used in years 4 & 5). The extras we read were very different stories from those we'd already read, and we enjoyed them immensely.

8. YWAM and other Christian book stores may have additional books. I recently was looking at a book called A Boy of Two Worlds by Lorna Eglin for my son. It was about a Masai boy. ECC will give you an outline of topics to study, and then you can take it from there!

9. Of course, there are many more biographies in your library about interesting folks from each continent, if your son enjoys biographies. I personally tried to steer away from "history" during ECC, and just enjoy the cultures of the world without tragedy, but even so there might be scientists or other interesting people that would fit into the ECC cultural theme.

10. Really what you describe is a "reading time" issue rather than a "book basket" issue. Book basket is not designed for reading novels. It's a time to explore the topics you've been learning about, from geography to culture to science biomes. Sometimes you may explore a familiar book in a new way (we had never noticed Madeline had actual French landmarks in the illustrations). Books don't need to be read from start to finish and multiple books can be enjoyed during the same day, or repeated from day to day. You describe your son as finding book basket "a chore," possibly because he prefers to just delve into a novel. Other kids may love book basket & find reading time "a chore." I think it's good to expand both their horizons :)

11. I would not be afraid to have a boy read books about girls, or vice versa. Children are children, and very often the main characters of good books have wide appeal. Also, the fathers and other little boys are often role models. I'm sure a boy wouldn't want to read 100% about girls, but a few here & there will probably go better than you are expecting -- I'm thinking about Heidi or Sadako or Rainbow Garden.



Well, there are some more ideas. I feel confident that if Crystal's oldest (another voracious reader) had plenty to read during ECC, your son will, too!
Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

cbollin

Re: ECC book basket

Unread post by cbollin » Sat Aug 29, 2009 5:01 am

Julie in MN wrote: Well, there are some more ideas. I feel confident that if Crystal's oldest (another voracious reader) had plenty to read during ECC, your son will, too!
Julie
yeah, my oldest reads everything and reads above her age/grade level. I don't always admit all of that. But she does. And she tends to like "boy" and "girl" stuff too. When we lived in Indiana, she was commonly checking out books at the library. So I understand the problem even if my solution isn't good for you. But she has never lacked for reading in MFW and is a voracious reader.

agreeing with Julie on all of it. It's a reading time issue, not book basket.

Curious on her son's perspective on Anne of Green Gables. (Julie's son, that is)

so brainstorming for Reading Time for you..... because that's the other place to look. what will they read during reading time, if book basket isn't enough for their preferences..... (even though my kid was good at just reading it all....)

1. one thing she liked: getting a subscription to God's World News magazine. Here's a link to a part of their magazine's website where you get a 10% discount (taken on 2nd page) and MFW gets referred proceeds for their Bible translation fund.

http://www.gwnews.com/mfw/

2. don't forget the General Reading list at the very back of the MFW manuals. Use those. It doesn't have to be related to history/social studies. That's another source for list. Then you can let him enjoy book basket for book basket. (like that makes sense at 447am) I think I mean, some light reading related to topic. then reading list on whatever.

3. if you go for the older missionary biographies... hmm..... My guess is that you might want to preview Peace Child for your 4th grader. uhm... yeah.
Bruchko will probably be ok. Narrow Road will be really long. hmm.... I dared to Call him Father. hmmm.... he just might not click with that one given his age., but I dont' know.

instead, how about other YWAM books that aren't used in MFW (those are the series in the ECC deluxe package).

4. what about something like World Book encyclopedia to read? My daughter loved using the computer edition last year to read read read read read, and play around with features to see pics around the world and listen to clips of music from places.

5. ok, so the novels in weeks 3-8 didn't strike his fancy? ok.... uhm... (don't let the titles in there make you think it is all "girly" stuff) What about turning to weeks 12-17 and looking at the europe fiction?

i think you'll find as the year goes along, it's going to self resolve. Lots of chapter books and novels for older kids are in the basket time. and I'm not sure where the AG references go in ECC either. confused. but that's ok.

so.. uhm yeah. basically (so, I'm awake too early b/c my autistic kid woke up too early.. and ...)
*add in God's World News magazine
*consider either more YWAM stories (but look ahead in ex1850 and 1850MOD for what is coming up and don't duplicate) or at least Bruchko from jr. high package. I really wouldn't do Peace Child with a 10 y.o. too much. no. content and maturity level. no.
*use the general reading list from the very back of the tm.
*don't assume that the titles mean it's a girl book. I'm looking at some of them and thinking "oh... but that's not exactly what the book is like".
*and there really will other books as you go along in book basket.


hope that makes sense... I woke up too early. and no... I wasn't offended at your questions and trying to figure out what is best for your child. glad I answer without fluffy bunnies everywhere. and remember, I'm just a customer trying to share what I've experienced.

-crystal
Last edited by cbollin on Sat Aug 29, 2009 4:31 pm, edited 1 time in total.

TriciaMR
Posts: 999
Joined: Thu Sep 20, 2007 11:43 am

Re: ECC book basket

Unread post by TriciaMR » Sat Aug 29, 2009 8:56 am

My dd was 3rd grade last year doing ECC. She loved the books - the picture books and the older ones. (I read some of the "older" grade levels to make sure they were okay for her.) I set the timer for 15 minutes, and that was it for book basket time. I would make sure book basket time is different from reading time. The book basket time is just to get a feel for the culture and their stories. The picture books were wonderful for this. My dd really loved all of them.

-Trish
Trish - Wife to Phil, Mom to Toni(18), Charlie(14), and Trent(14)
2014-2015 - AHL, CTG
2015-2016 - WHL, RTR
2016-2017 - EXP1850, US1877
2017-2018 - DE, 1850MOD
2018-2019 - College, AHL
My blog

LSH in MS
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Re: ECC book basket

Unread post by LSH in MS » Sat Aug 29, 2009 11:16 am

Would the Trailblazer books by Neta Jackson be appropriate? They are listed for 9-12 year olds. They have some great titles of missionaries in various continents.

My children enjoyed Ali and the Golden Eagle (Saudi Arabia) and Letters from Rifka and The Endless Steppe (Russia), King of the WInd from the Book basket list. Even though Letters from Rifka has a girl as the main character it is not girlie, but a very exciting and heartwarming story. You could also do a general search at your library on the topics for each week.
Lori

wife to Clifford, mother to ds (17), ds (16), ds (15, ds (13), ds (8), and ds (3)
MFW user for 10 years

RobinF
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Re: ECC book basket

Unread post by RobinF » Sat Aug 29, 2009 5:59 pm

Thanks for all the suggestions. I know that part of the issue is my personal preference for the use of the book basket. I am not following MFW suggestions exactly but we are doing what works for us and our family. We have lots of good Christian bios and Missionary bios and I was hoping to find some good fiction/chapter books for him that would tie into the cultural studies. I did find some books from one of the links that I think will work for us.

Sorry for the confusion over the girl reference. I was saying I would like to find something like that for my children to read that was written for and to boys. I am not "forcing" him to read only boyish material but I am also not going to give him an assignment for book basket that will make reading a chore.

TriciaMR
Posts: 999
Joined: Thu Sep 20, 2007 11:43 am

MFW Reading with Older DC (Multiples)

Unread post by TriciaMR » Fri Sep 25, 2009 11:44 am

hsmomof5 wrote:We are reaching a point of digging deeper into our reading. We have thoroughly enjoyed the CTG read a louds (Tanglewood Series). They beg for more each day, but I have been trying to make a decision about the other readings. I have one 5th grader and two 6th graders (twins).

Should I just assign the recommended history related reading books to them to independently read or should I read them as a read alouds? I want them to read independently as well but was wondering how to go about it.

If we do the history related readings as read alouds then I would assign other readings/library books for their independent free reading time. We are doing the Pizza Hut Book It program so maybe that would be best. Hmm. What do you think?
I read the history aloud so my kids can narrate and we can discuss.

I would do "independent reading" through the book basket, but that's just me.

For reading at grade level (my dd is 9, and I still want her to read to me), I use Pathway Readers and Abeka Readers.

-Trish
Trish - Wife to Phil, Mom to Toni(18), Charlie(14), and Trent(14)
2014-2015 - AHL, CTG
2015-2016 - WHL, RTR
2016-2017 - EXP1850, US1877
2017-2018 - DE, 1850MOD
2018-2019 - College, AHL
My blog

Julie in MN
Posts: 2927
Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 3:44 pm
Location: Minnesota

Re: MFW Reading with Older DC (Multiples)

Unread post by Julie in MN » Fri Sep 25, 2009 6:14 pm

hsmomof5 wrote:I'm sorry, Trish but I wasn't clear. I have only a few titles for our book basket. Our library is awful so I had to purchase a few books and borrow others. I had been thinking about reading aloud those that we had since I'm teaching 3 on the same level and allowing them to choose other books for their independent free reading but I see what you're saying also. Makes sense. That's the entire purpose of the book basket, isn't it? They could also just rotate those books around as one finishes one book, the other can start reading it while we are continuing the study of that historical period.

Where is my head? Did anyone find it out there? "Here heady, heady!" :-)

Thanks, ladies!
8[]

I have 3 reading times at our house, I guess. Maybe this is the same as you all.

(1) Read-alouds, done by mom, especially when content is important to history or character lessons lend themselves to discussion.

(2) Book basket, done independently with no parameters. Well, except maybe one rule I heard David Hazell say once, "A book must be in the hand during the whole time." Ds may look at pictures, read something that piques his interest, or skim thru multiple books.

(3) Reading time. My son must read approximately a chapter a day on his own, with chapters getting progressively longer over the years. He isn't particularly fussy, so I usually gauge his current interest level & make a choice or give him a few to choose from. Sometimes he's reading starred books from the book basket list or a biography about someone from history. But other times (and especially in CTG when there isn't a lot of historical literature) he's read about science or current events or mysteries or classics or even one year he read mostly funny books (Mrs. Piggle Wiggle, Pippi, etc.). Non-historic books have been fine, and even a good opportunity for him to know some of the well-known characters of our times.


I think this variety (built in by MFW) has helped encourage him to enjoy reading while at the same time increasing his skills.
Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

baileymom
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Re: MFW Reading with Older DC (Multiples)

Unread post by baileymom » Sun Sep 27, 2009 7:58 am

Kysha

The literature suggestions at the end of the TM is what I mostly used for "Independent" reading...usually at night before bed, and during our Quiet Time (nap time for littles).

Another mom mentioned a place she found historical and biblical fiction, I've used the Veritas Press catalog for this also.
Kathi - graduated 1, homeschooling 6, preschooling 2, growing 1

my3boys
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Re: MFW Reading with Older DC (Multiples)

Unread post by my3boys » Sun Sep 27, 2009 8:15 am

We do the same as Julie with 3 sepreate reading times, except I will sometimes read a book basket book during history time if I am particularly interested in it :) (that's why I read the history books out loud as well - I'm enjoying my own education). I plan on getting Homer on CD because I have heard that it is a difficult read.
Alison
Mom to 3 busy boys ages 11, 8, and 6
finished K, First, ECC, and CtG - currently using RtR

hsmomof5
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Re: MFW Reading with Older DC (Multiples)

Unread post by hsmomof5 » Sun Sep 27, 2009 2:11 pm

Thanks for the great advice, everyone! I'm soaking it all in. I'm re-educating myself also with the read alouds. Maybe that's why I want to read all of the books and let them find their own. HeeHee!
~Kysha
ds 19 (college freshman), ds 12, ds 12, and ds 10 (ECC '08) (CTG '09), dd 3 (Preschool)

cbollin

Book basket/Reading???

Unread post by cbollin » Sun Apr 10, 2011 8:01 pm

robertb10502 wrote:I am getting everything ready to start Adventures. I am sure I am missing something....I have been staring at this for a while. Are they really that differnt?? Under reading where it is explained, it says to when possible to choose a book that relates to the historical time period. Isn't that what book basket is?? What did I miss?? :~
I can remember a conversation about 4.5 years ago with david hazell on that as I was confused too. What was I missing? The best I remember what he discussed:

Part of it has to do with goals. Part of it is what to read. During "reading" time, you can focus on finishing a book (i.e. you "have" to read this). You also focus on reading comprehension and take some time to listen to them read out loud from the books to you to check and listen for fluency, comprehension, and a few points here and narration. So, in the "ideal unit study" format, those novels and chapter books would be somehow related once in a while to something in the same thing you are studying in history/science/music/art. But, it doesn't have to be related if you can't find one or don't want to , or would rather just do something else. But one example is to save a longer novel and do it as a time that makes sense with other studies. Again, if that doesn't happen, it doesn't really matter.

Book basket has a bit of a different goal. You don't have to quiz, narrate, etc. You don't have to finish these books if they really don't like them. Yes, you can use a title or chapter book from basket suggestion as "reading time". So there is plenty of cross over.

Book basket is more for the enjoyment of engaging with the books and learning to love/like reading. books can be at, above or even below reading leve.
Reading time is to improve reading skills. books should be at or just slightly below current reading level to encourage child to finish.
read aloud: parent reads this to child, it's fine if it is above reading level, no quizzing needed, it can be related to unit study, but doesn't have to.

all 3 kinds serve different slightly different purposes.

-crystal

Kelly1730
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Re: Book basket/Reading???

Unread post by Kelly1730 » Sun Apr 10, 2011 8:11 pm

There are lots of threads about the book basket. But the way we've always used book basket is for about a 15 minute or so time slot for the kids just to sort of browse through the topical books that I've picked up at the library. Sometimes they'll read through an entire book on their own, sometimes they'll just sort of skim them. Once in awhile I'll choose one of the books to read aloud in addition to our assigned read alouds. Reading, at least how it works here, is for the boys to read their current chapter book, at least one chapter maybe more depending on the difficulty of the book. Kind of like the Sustained Silent Reading we used to do in grade school;)

Hope this helps and have fun, Adventures is a wonderful year!
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robertb10502
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Re: Book basket/Reading???

Unread post by robertb10502 » Mon Apr 11, 2011 9:18 am

Thank you!! Now I understand it :)
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TriciaMR
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Reading/Literature Question & Book Basket

Unread post by TriciaMR » Mon Jul 27, 2015 10:44 am

cappy wrote:Can someone tell me a bit more about the reading/literature portion of MFW, specifically the time between kids becoming independent readers through jr high. I see that once the hit 7th they start the progeny guides. But before that.....there's the book basket. I think I'm understanding that is where they would get their independent reading/literature "study" from, right? And, at that age, are they doing anything with that reading, or do they just read --obviously we'd have discussion about their reading, so I know either way they will have that, but my question is about formal literature study. Is it considered unnecessary pre-jr high or is it built in somewhere?

Also.....are you assigning specific books from the basket or are you putting them in their and they choose? If they are choosing, how does that work with multiple ages---does each age/reading level have its own separate basket, or are you putting all levels in the same basket and assuming they pick the books most appropriate for them? Am I overthinking this? The book basket thing is new to me;-)
Actually, book basket is not the same as reading/literature.

Book basket is a time to enjoy a variety of books on the Bible, History, and Science you are covering in school. Think of it as a buffet, the children may pick and choose from.

For reading, there is a list of books at the back of the TM that are classics, that are by "grade level or above". You want your child to read 30 minutes from a book, occasionally reading to you and making sure they are comprehending what they are reading.
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DS4home
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Re: Reading/Literature Question & Book Basket

Unread post by DS4home » Mon Jul 27, 2015 11:15 am

Agreeing with Trish that they are two different things with different goals.
If you take a look at the TM you will find Book Basket is listed in the middle of the grid along with the history things. Trish explained it well, as being like a buffet. You can have a basket full of all different reading levels, and all different kinds of literature (fiction, biography, adventure, humorous, art books, cookbooks, etc.) This develops the love of learning as they get to pick and choose what interests them.

Reading on the other hand has its own block of time and is found after history, science, and math. This is where I pick out the book for them, making sure it is at and not below their reading level. ;) My kids would of course, choose easy reading... This is also where I make sure they read something other than their favorite genre. For example: when all my girls want to read is historical fiction, I make sure they also read at least one biography every year, etc.

Hope that helps see the differences between the two subjects.
Dawn
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cappy
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Re: Reading/Literature Question & Book Basket

Unread post by cappy » Mon Jul 27, 2015 12:04 pm

Thank you both! This makes a whole lot more sense :) . I wish I was able to see a teacher book in person to see the more explanatory intro's and appendix. Unfortunately MFW doesn't come to the homeschool conferences in my state (I don't blame them....our conferences leave a lot to be desired, sadly. Oh well.....I do think I'm starting to understand it a little better now. Thanks again!

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Re: Reading/Literature Question & Book Basket

Unread post by asheslawson » Mon Jul 27, 2015 3:40 pm

Agreeing with both others in this response. I did sometimes add some assignments, though I kept them simple so as not to bog them down and stress their reading time. Of course there is narration, and sometimes if I liked something in the book specifically, I would assign copywork for handwriting and writing practice. I sometimes would also assign a book report - for my worksheet lover - I would find an easy to complete format that would help him pull out some highlights from the book that he could share. For both, I might have them do a "cereal box" report, which I would give them some guidance, and they would create a book report and glue it to the outside edges of a cereal box. For my more art loving girl, I might let her build a diorama, paint a picture, or some other way to model her book (lapbook, acting out a portion of the book, etc.). She loves doing this - and I always found it fun to see that something I remembered fondly from a book, might not be their favorite part. I didn't do these with every book, and tried to keep them fun and non-stressful. I usually only had them do this once or twice in a school year.
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