11th and 12th Grade MFW vs. dual enrollment

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Sallylourn
Posts: 17
Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2016 9:17 pm

11th and 12th Grade MFW vs. dual enrollment

Unread post by Sallylourn »

My oldest has been using MFW since 5th grade, and now he is halfway through 10th and doing great in WHL. I always try to buy my curriculum for the next school year in November for the best deal, so that time is quickly approaching. However, our state has the opportunity for free dual enrollment classes, which is such a good bargain with the rising cost of higher education. My preference to stay with MFW for Bible, history, and literature and then just do dual enrollment for math, electives, etc., but that could change. The way 11th grade is set up with half a credit of history and half a credit of government might make it difficult if we decided to change course in 12th grade. Then, he wouldn’t get that other 1/2 credit of US history. So, I’m a bit torn on what to do. I read the thread in the archives already from 2010-2012 about this issue, but I’m wondering if there are any new thoughts or experiences with this situation.

On another note, I noticed that the 5th edition of the BJU US history book has a lot of extra parts that need to be purchased per student and are not compatible with other editions. I have 3 other students coming through in the next several years that would also be using these books. Does that mean I should go ahead and buy 3 more copies if those now just in case that edition goes out of print? But then I’m thinking, what if one of my girls doesn’t go in that direction? Then it would be a waste of money. If you can tell, I like to plan ahead. My youngest is 5, so it will be a long, long time til she is in 11th grade! But I want to get the most out of my money, so I’ve been thinking a lot about this. Any advice would be greatly appreciated!
Sarah, wife of Steve
Mom of Timothy (15), Talia (13), Violet (8), and Lydia (5)
2016-2017 ECC (first year homeschooling)
2017-2018 CTG and VOD
2018-2019 RTR and K
2019-2020 Exp to 1850 and 1st
2020-2021 AHL, 1850 to Mod, VOD
2021-2022 WHL, ECC, and K
Julie - Staff
Moderator
Posts: 1068
Joined: Fri Nov 03, 2006 11:52 am

Re: 11th and 12th Grade MFW vs. dual enrollment

Unread post by Julie - Staff »

Hi Sarah,

Often families want to include a robust Bible credit in 12th grade, preparing students for spiritual disciplines they can use into adulthood, so you may end up wanting the 12th grade package.

However, all of the books you will need for the second semester of U.S. history will already be included in the earlier package, U.S. History to 1877. The additional semester of history can be accomplished by continuing to use those materials and following the format presented in the lesson plans from U.S. History to 1877. Many of our students joining us in 10th grade follow that plan (see the FAQ for 10th grade).

As for planning ahead, the high school programs scheduled the 4th edition of the BJU textbook set starting in 2012 and the 5th edition starting in 2019, so there will likely be an update in the years ahead. The only consumables are the Student Activities book and Tests, and you have the option of purchasing those in advance, especially for your 13-year-old. Look for a link to "Individual Items" just underneath the price box on the package web page. (The Timeline Book is also consumed, but that is not tied to any BJU edition.)

Because your younger two won't be in high school for a while, you might find you are ready to update materials by that point. Marie Hazell offers an upgrade of high school Daily Lesson Plans for families who want to update materials and use the corresponding Lesson Plans (the Daily Lesson Plans upgrade is currently less than half price at $58).

Hope that helps you think this through,
Julie
Julie - Staff
Moderator
Posts: 1068
Joined: Fri Nov 03, 2006 11:52 am

Re: 11th and 12th Grade MFW vs. dual enrollment

Unread post by Julie - Staff »

Sarah,

I should also add that using trusted Christian texts to complete the U.S. history credit and even the government credit would be an excellent choice for these values-laden subjects, compared to the unknown teaching content at a public or even a private university today.

Julie
Sallylourn
Posts: 17
Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2016 9:17 pm

Re: 11th and 12th Grade MFW vs. dual enrollment

Unread post by Sallylourn »

Thanks, Julie! That is really helpful information. I am leaning more towards using MFW throughout high school for Bible, history and English, but my husband is wanting to get more savings out of dual enrollment courses, so it’s difficult to make a firm decision. But you’ve given me a lot to think about.
Sarah, wife of Steve
Mom of Timothy (15), Talia (13), Violet (8), and Lydia (5)
2016-2017 ECC (first year homeschooling)
2017-2018 CTG and VOD
2018-2019 RTR and K
2019-2020 Exp to 1850 and 1st
2020-2021 AHL, 1850 to Mod, VOD
2021-2022 WHL, ECC, and K
ruthamelia
Posts: 57
Joined: Tue Apr 29, 2014 5:34 pm

Re: 11th and 12th Grade MFW vs. dual enrollment

Unread post by ruthamelia »

I realize this thread is a little old, but as I happened upon it I just thought I would add some thoughts.

I teach at a local community college and have for over 10 years. I often speak (personally, not in any official capacity) with families who are considering dual enrollment during high school years, and while I never tell anyone definitively not to do this, I do encourage MUCH caution, and consideration of the specific child. While you may hear about universities in the news, even the community college level is a heavily biased and politicized institution, and even math classes are not immune to this. Science and English courses will often have a heavily non-Biblical worldview, and many other areas of study do as well. Of course this is not comprehensive, but it is probably more than you think. I suggest parents sign up to audit a class or two themselves- it is usually quite low cost, and provides you full access to an entire course. You can attend a few classes, view online materials, and gauge the effect the environment will have on your child. Some teenagers have a solid understanding of their worldview and will be able to sift the grain from the chaff in a course, while others will have trouble withstanding an assault on what you have taught them so far. In the latter case, a few extra years of maturing would be worthwhile. If you do choose dual enrollment at a public institution, I would encourage regular conversation with your student about their course(s), and looking over their shoulder from time to time to see what they are reading and researching.

As an extra thought, while it is not free, there are some private, reasonably priced dual enrollment options.

Ruth
Kids in school: 18 (graduated), 16, 13, 10, 9, 7, 7
We have used: K, First, all Investigate years, AHL, WHL
2021-22 Exp-1850, WHL
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