Exp to 1850 history summaries...is there another way?

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cinmor
Posts: 12
Joined: Tue Jan 10, 2012 3:16 pm
Location: Texas

Exp to 1850 history summaries...is there another way?

Unread post by cinmor » Tue Jan 17, 2017 3:20 pm

Hi all!
Was trying to brainstorm some ideas for my 7th grader, who has a full plate this year it seems. She's doing Apologia general science, and essentials in writing as her writing program. Using All in One English for her grammar review. It seems like there's a lot of writing for her this year between all the things I just listed, and the history summaries. Has anyone come up with an alternative to writing the summaries? In the past years I've had her give them to me orally, basically dictate back to me what we read. But I would like to have something to be able to have in her notebook. Has anyone tried anything different? Maybe there's someone who has created some worksheets or something? I still want to have her write some summaries occasionally, but it would be nice to have some variety and give her a break.
Thanks!
Cindy
Cindy M
Mama to
Joseph Age (18 mos)
Mikayla Age (8)~Completing Learning God's story, moving on to Adventures/Exp to 1850 with big sis
Hannah Age (12)~Already completed MFW K,1st, Adv, ECC, CTC, and RTR, now doing Exp to 1850

Julie in MN
Posts: 2927
Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 3:44 pm
Location: Minnesota

Re: Exp to 1850 history summaries...is there another way?

Unread post by Julie in MN » Tue Jan 17, 2017 11:29 pm

If she is able or allowed to use a computer to create notebook pages, then there are a lot of options available. Depending on how computer-savvy she is, they may be quick and easy for her. If not, it is still a good skill to begin learning, since many college assignments these days (and even job assignments) will expect a multi-media component.

My youngest would create notebook pages on the computer using online illustrations, maps, or graphs. He would take photos and upload them. He would write in different fonts, colors, and styles - one week it might be a newspaper announcement and the next it would look like a very old-school typewriter copy. Occasionally he would "interview" others on their thoughts about a topic, or pretend to interview a historical figure.

To me, history summaries do not have to be English composition assignments in correct form. Also, the summaries do not all have to be thorough. Being concise is a skill, as well. So is being funny - my son got good scores when adding humor to some of his early college presentations, because he kept the attention of his audience :)

My daughter was an artistic type. She homeschooled before MFW was available for her age level, but she still created a history notebook. She often did drawings and maps by hand. She use calligraphy for simple headings and years, or for favorite quotes. When she had to cover a lot of facts, she might make a simple bullet lists of chronological events - or she would label each page with a year or a span of years, and she would add events as she read about them.

Typically by 7th, I told my youngest pencil-hater that he should expect to write (or type) at least once per day. But if he was writing in one area, then he could ask for mercy and we might put off notebook pages until the next day.

Just a few things I remember,
Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

cinmor
Posts: 12
Joined: Tue Jan 10, 2012 3:16 pm
Location: Texas

Re: Exp to 1850 history summaries...is there another way?

Unread post by cinmor » Wed Jan 18, 2017 3:29 pm

Julie,
Thanks for your reply! Today, she's doing bullet points. :-) We kind of worked with her today to stay focused and really be mindful of how much time she is taking for each task for school, to help her realize that school doesn't have to go all day!!

Wondering, did you have your 7th grader do the Progeny Press literature guides? I bought Johnny Tremain and the Witch of Blackbird Pond for her, with the study guides, but it's always so hard to squeeze those into the week, those and the read alouds, with everything else we have going on!! I don't feel like we're able to stay on top of everything!! I love the read alouds and the literature too, I really want her to enjoy those, but it seems like this year the required subjects are just taking so much time, and I want her to be able to have some enjoyment in her school too!
Cindy M
Mama to
Joseph Age (18 mos)
Mikayla Age (8)~Completing Learning God's story, moving on to Adventures/Exp to 1850 with big sis
Hannah Age (12)~Already completed MFW K,1st, Adv, ECC, CTC, and RTR, now doing Exp to 1850

Julie in MN
Posts: 2927
Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 3:44 pm
Location: Minnesota

Re: Exp to 1850 history summaries...is there another way?

Unread post by Julie in MN » Wed Jan 18, 2017 9:25 pm

HI Cindy,
Glad you found something helpful to try.

My youngest did Progeny Press guides. They benefited him, since he wasn't likely to see deeper messages beyond "this happened and then this happened."

At our house, reading the book was done first - the book was used for the "daily reading" part of the grid until he was done reading the book. Then, I let him stop grammar and instead work on the questions in the Progeny guide. (The MFW grammar and writing assignments were a bit different at the time, so it might not completely apply?)

One thing I will mention is that each writer has strengths and weaknesses. My youngest son was lackadaisical and could churn out a paragraph or two on a whim, so writing itself (or typing) was not terribly difficult but he needed a LOT of work on fact checking and other edits.

My daughter, on the other hand, was a perfectionist. She did not need much time for editing because everything was already perfect, including her grammar. Instead she had to be forced to wing it a little more - go faster, take a risk, come up with her own idea for a thesis statement.

Middle school is a good time to figure out your child's strengths and weaknesses. We want to give continual encouragement for strengths, but then you have the authority to say, "You've got that, we can move on." For example, there are Progeny Press sections that work on different skills, such as comprehension or thinking deeper. Maybe she has already mastered one of the areas and doesn't really need to do all of those questions?

Finally, I think sometimes kids get behind because they are unorganized. There was a time my son needed a drawer with lots of pencils so he didn't waste time looking for one. We used sticky-tabs for marking his place in a book, so he didn't spend time leafing through to find the next page. He had his own book shelf. Pinning down these kinds of things is great preparation for high school and beyond.

If a student has all materials ready in the morning and does not take a lot of breaks, then MFW in 7th grade should take no more than 5 hours of actual working time each day (excluding lunchtime), with a lighter day on Fridays for service and outside activities. If my perfectionist daughter wanted to spend longer, then we would still move on and she could work on things independently in the evenings if she chose.

Well that was a bit rambling :)
Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

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