Classical Education and MFW (Author response)

Sue in MN
Posts: 34
Joined: Sat Mar 24, 2007 12:01 pm

Classical Education and MFW (Author response)

Unread post by Sue in MN » Wed Jan 05, 2005 4:38 pm

Melissa wrote:I just read The Well-Trained Mind and have become very interested in classical education. Would some of you veteran MFW users tell me your opinion of how MFW compares/contrasts with classical education thinking. Thanks for your input.
Author: Sue in MN
Date: 5/11/2004

MFW is classical. The Well Trained Mind is not the only opinion out there on how to teach in a classical way. Mr. Hazell discussed MFW and classical at the MACHE convention that I attended in April. Hopefully, they can recap a few points for you.

I like the simplicity of MFW and the Biblical base. I think of it as Classical for Real People.

Sue in MN

Marie
Posts: 407
Joined: Wed Mar 03, 2004 2:30 pm

Unread post by Marie » Wed Jan 05, 2005 4:40 pm

Author:Marie
Date: 5/11/2004

We begin by giving children a strong foundation -- God the Creator and His amazing world (MFW-K) and God's Word to Live By: The Bible (MFW-1). At the same time we focus on reading skills so that children read well at the end of first grade.

We then begin our four year chronological sweep of history--but with a slight addition...we first have a year of geography/cultural awareness (Exploring Countries and Cultures)to set a foundation for history.

Our history then begins at the beginning--Creation--and uses the best primary source history document that exists--the Bible. We study history chronologically for four years. This includes mapwork, timelines, history notebook, hands-on history projects, etc. We include a list of library books so that you can enrich the topics you study with historical fiction and more information books. A unique feature of our program is that science is already integrated into our program. (You will study pyramids in science along with ancient Egypt.)

We study Greek and Latin roots in Years 2 and 3 (rather than studying a full Latin language course) and recommend the addition of a foreign languguage that the child is likely to use at some point. Memory work (Bible passages), copywork, and dictations are also built into our program. We include the study of art history and music in our deluxe packages.

At the end of our five year cycle you will have covered the Bible, history in-depth, and all major science topics. Our goal is to nurture the God-given love of learning in each child.

After our five year cycle, students are ready to study history again, this time on a deeper level of understanding.

Susu
Posts: 1
Joined: Fri Apr 08, 2005 5:49 pm

K & 1st - Just wanted to thank you for MFW!

Unread post by Susu » Wed Feb 16, 2005 2:48 pm

Posted: Fri Apr 08, 2005 5:53 pm

Hi Marie,

I went to your husband's conference in Raleigh, NC yesterday, and was just telling him how much I appreciated your curriculum. I am using MFW First grade and MFW Kindergarten for my two young children, and am really excited about Adventures for next year.

I spent years teaching my older two children, following the classical method (as is described in the Well Trained Mind). I really liked so much of what I saw in the classical method, but found it really frustrating to do long term. Our days were really long, and I was getting burned out. I was very nervous about teaching my younger two with this method. I was afraid that I would become way too intense with them and overwhelm them. (I tend to let a curriculum start to drive me, rather than me driving it!)

MFW has been such a blessing to me. I feel like I am covering the best of the Classical method, while at the same time having fun and relaxing! My children are learning and enjoy school. They have time to be children and develop their imagination. I can relax and not have to constantly worry if I am reaching some ridiculously high imaginary standard.

I am trained as an elementary teacher, but have only taught 3rd grade. So I can see the value in the "little things" you include with your daily lesson plans. It helps me to relax, knowing that I am following a plan that is well thought out and covers all the bases.

I am praying for you. You are not only ministering to parents and our children...but are providing a vision for the next generation. Only God knows how many precious lives will be impacted simply because you have written such an awesome curriculum.

Many blessings,
Susan Ford

Toni@homezcool4us
Posts: 122
Joined: Wed Jul 06, 2005 4:28 pm

Classical family switching to MFW

Unread post by Toni@homezcool4us » Sat Apr 26, 2008 10:48 pm

dkabler wrote:I am currently planning on making the switch from to MFW. (Am very excited!!)
Posted: Wed Mar 15, 2006 11:28 am
Just wanted to welcome you to MFW. You're going to LOVE it. You'll still get those classical elements you love and will feel you have the time and energy to complete assignments. MFW really is a great fit for us. I believe you'll enjoy it as well. We're starting Adventures in the fall.

Lucy
Posts: 442
Joined: Mon Nov 08, 2004 9:37 am

Does MFW follow a classical model?

Unread post by Lucy » Sat May 24, 2008 10:54 am

Posted: Tue Nov 28, 2006 10:51 am
MFW does not follow a pure classical model. We do 3 rounds through history but not as indepth the first time. So it looks like this:

1st sweep through:
K-2nd
K--God Gave Us the World and Everything in It/Creation
1st--God Gave us His Word to Live By/Ancient History
2nd--American History

2nd sweep through
3rd-8th
This includes the years 1-5 beginning with ECC
(repeat any levels done in 2nd and 3rd in 7th and 8th)

3rd sweep through
9th-12th
MFW is now piloting Creation to the Greeks for high school this year and God willing will add one each year until it is completed

Teresa in TX
Posts: 74
Joined: Fri Mar 16, 2007 4:20 pm

Learning with memory cards

Unread post by Teresa in TX » Sun Jun 07, 2009 3:24 pm

AKmomto2 wrote:I was just wondering if any of you are familiar with this and what your opinion is? I have no plans to use anything other than MFW but thought about using some of the VP stuff in addition to MFW.
Di
I used it two years ago. It was the year before we started with mfw. While I really think the cds and cards are helpful as memory aids, I found the entire program dry. We used the cds, cards & teacher's manual with some other books that were recommended. There was really no life to the program, my kids found the worksheets monotonous, and most of the projects were fairly boring, especially in relation to what have done with MFW to date. At this point, if I had the money, I would purchase all of the Bible and History cards and cds and divide those 5 years worth into the 4 that MFW does for history and use them strictly as memory tools.

Yes, this is a MFW message board, but I would definitely say the same thing if it weren't. I think they have some great books and academic items, but their grade levels on most of their products are just not realistic...I'd say they have kids reading books and doing a lot of work that is at least 1 to 2 years above level. Others may disagree on that, depending on the child. I want my kids to love learning and to desire to learn, and while there were aspects they did like and get a lot out of, I don't think that accomplished those goals for us.
Teresa, Mom of 5: 15yo dd, 12yo ds, 7yo ds, 5yo ds, and 1yo ds

4th year with MFW
Using:
MFW 1st w/ 7yo ds
MFW RtR w/ 7th grade ds
MFW World History with 10th grade dd
So far we have used: ECC, 1850-Present, CTG, RtR, High School Ancients and MFW K

RBS in OH
Posts: 43
Joined: Thu Nov 13, 2008 2:34 pm

Re: Learning with memory cards

Unread post by RBS in OH » Mon Jun 08, 2009 9:19 am

..just saw this thread this a.m., and have a few thoughts to add. Their catalogs are so different! I was quite enamored with VP as it "boasts" the best products and I went with it our first year for K. I just thought that its prescribed plan would provide such a strong education for my dc. Besides that, my kids already knew how to read and I thought we'd be repeating too much to go with MFW. VP doesn't really cover science for K-6, so I put it together my own. My concluding thoughts are that the phonics TM was too much to read and the expensive lesson plans lacked something. All in all, the year was just o.k.

Then I took a look back at the MFW catalog: It's concise and very humble; it seemed to be a very Christ-centered program and I decided to give it a try now. And WOW, I LOVE it! It covers science --now a favorite subject for my dc; the TM is everything I could wish for; it really is meatier than meets the eye (that's the humble part); and subjects flow together well and it aids in developing a heart for the Lord.

I still peruse the other catalog; I don't salivate they way I used to, yet I do believe that there are some good and useful things that you could add to coordinating MFW studies--just as extras though--definitely not necessary. I have found that book basket really takes care of expanding the learning very well.
Rachel

ds(14) 8) and dd(14) ;)
We've enjoyed ADV, ECC (2 times), CTG, RTR, EX-1850, 1850-MOD--and now AHL this year!

cbollin

mfw vs classical

Unread post by cbollin » Thu Mar 18, 2010 5:20 pm

davidmendez5 wrote:Hi all, this is our first year with my father's world. We are doing K, 1st, and ECC. I have grown to love MFW and the kids enjoy it too.

My downfall this year that has become very discouraging is the notion that our kids will not be as academically strong if we don't do classical 100%. I see some of the classical elements in the early years but in high school i don't see courses dedicated to logic and rhetoric. Before this year we were enrolled in Christian Classical School (2 and half days at school and homeschool the rest). I am reading the well trained mind trying to really examine and understand what makes classical so appealing and is it really superior and necessary. I ordered the conference tapes by David which was helpful, not finished with all of them yet. My question is for anyone in a similar position who can share their experience with prior classical background and fear that any other education is inferior. How important is the logic and rhetoric courses in high school and does MFW do anything similar and maybe not call it by those names. Any advice would be so appreciated.
Filitsa
Filitsa,

Welcome along! I think the best starting point is like you said: getting the David Hazell workshop called What Should Christians Teach in the 21st century. That workshops explains so much with Classical MFW that you'll see the big road map with how MFW tweaks classical in small ways.

I just have a few bullet points to try to get the conversation started with some of what you're working through.

MFW is a classical program so there's really no "versus" in it against classical. MFW writes and plans for "classical" education in the sense of what were the goals of classical tutors (especially in Biblical worldview) and how does that apply in our 21st century lives as those living for the kingdom of God. Classical education is more than "latin and logic" and "specific names of stages of learning".

People interpret classical education in the 21st century in some different ways here and there. Well Trained Mind is one example. But not the exclusive one.
For one example where MFW differs from the Well trained mind....., MFW does not require doing Latin as a full foreign language. Some MFW users want to do Latin and they certainly can do that for their foreign language. Nothing wrong with it.
MFW follows more in the practical foreign language -- what will be helpful for you to use in the Kingdom of God. Latin and Greek Roots are part of the program. Also, MFW formally will study parts of speech, but doesn't start the rote memory of that in first grade. Lots of classical educators waited on that too -- Charlotte Mason is considered by many (including the author of WTM book) to be a classical educator -- and Miss Mason didn't start rote memory of parts of speech in first grade. However, you have the flexibility in MFW if you prefer, to use other language arts routes.

So, clearly there is room in classical education curriculum for some flexibility even among homeschoolings "experts".

Logic:
MFW uses the Bluedorns books for Logic and suggests that in 9th grade for semester credit. It is in the electives in high school. Other "logic and rhetoric" is done through learning the argumentative essay in high school, and various apologetics materials. MFW definitely has the classical high school going -- it's just from a Biblical model instead of a Greek only model. Most of it is in the English credits and even in the Bible materials too.

In jr. high -- much of the logic is done in "hidden ways" with Apologia Science, and math courses too. and I think the more independent research and transition to working more and more on their own is great in these years. and I personally think that the critical thinking skills covered in Singapore math in the elementary has a lot of "logic" training too.

Also, MFW uses Story of the World (written by the same person who wrote WTM) and uses many of the same ideas in WTM such as outlining, reading extra from "encyclopedia" style texts and adding in literature.

So I think if you like the ideas in WTM (and they are ideals), and really want a Biblical worldview as the foundation for your classical education, you are probably going to like MFW.


Is Classical the "best" way (i.e. somehow superior to other ways)? No, of course not. It is a good way though. And with all of the fancy language that classical educators can toss around -- why we can sound rather snooty at times, can't we. 8[] 8[] 8[] But don't believe that it is the only superior way. Remember -- we give a lot to our children by being their tutors even if they never learn Latin.
I was not trained "classically" nor was my husband. He holds a PHD in chemistry from a university that ranks about #12 or #13 in the nation. He never took Latin. I have a few degrees myself. never took Latin. Classical is just one and only one way. We're fairly advanced academic geeks even though we were not "classically" trained in public schools in the '70's and 80's.

a few other thoughts......

MFW has an academically strong path.... I mentioned how geeky my husband and I are. We liked the academics in MFW. They have selected a lot of good products along the way.

This is not an exhaustive list, but I want to make sure you see some of the high school academic strength even if I don't get all of the info from English (writing argumentative essay, etc) and History.
In high school, they recommend Saxon Math (which has a strong academic track record) and Jacobs Geometry too. They recommend Apologia Science series-- very strong academics. They are recommending a path in high school so that you can receive college credit for US history and for English composition while still in high school. They offer an SAT prep book. It's all there. It's "hidden" in the high school, but they even have recommendations for the fine arts credit that many of us need to do in high school to be competitive for entering college. And probably one of the best college prep things that MFW offers: teaching the student to learn more independently and stay on a syllabus!

So even if you don't "do classical 100%" (whatever that really means), you can still have a very strong academic path in MFW. And getting them ready for college and life. My oldest is in 8th grade and done MFW since 2nd grade. She's still strong and advanced and we've followed MFW recommendation for a long time. She still has weak areas in her personal skills -- but it's because of her, not because of the materials. We have all strengths and weaknesses in subjects.

blessings,
-crystal

Postby cbollin » Tue Mar 23, 2010 9:14 am
For those who aren't sure about Latin... here's a great article
http://www.abasiccurriculum.com/homesch ... essay.html

it says everything I wish I could say out loud about this topic but am too chicken to do so.

-crystal

4Truth
Posts: 334
Joined: Fri Dec 17, 2004 11:59 am

Re: mfw vs classical

Unread post by 4Truth » Thu Mar 18, 2010 8:28 pm

((Filitsa))

May I encourage you to listen, or re-listen, to David's talk about educating our children in the 21st century. This was the discussion that helped my dh and I to understand the MFW philosophy and balance where we were headed. We moms get a lot of pressure from those who educate differently than we do, especially in a setting like you're in with the church school. (We were in that same setting at the time we found MFW, and I had just read The Well Trained Mind. Let me say that I don't believe there's any such thing as a "neutral" education.)

One thing you can take comfort in with MFW is that if, after listening to that discussion with your dh and prayerfully moving forward with MFW, if you still feel that your children need Latin and some other components of TWTM style education, MFW is flexible enough to do that. I don't believe it's necessary, but that's a conviction you and your dh have to work out in your own home.

I would encourage you to get to a convention booth and take some time to look through all the future years of MFW in order to get an idea of where this curriculum will take you. If you can't do that, then maybe you could at least print out all the sample lessons for each year of MFW and read through them in order. Set Latin and the other variables aside for a few hours, pour over those sample lessons to see what you'll be studying in history, Bible, and science each year, and also consider how each year builds upon previous years to lay a strong biblical foundation in all areas... along with strong academics.

Praying for peace for you as you decide! I really think it'll be okay, though. :)
Donna, with two MFW graduates and the "baby" in 11th grade! %| Using MFW since 2004.

davidmendez5
Posts: 4
Joined: Tue Mar 16, 2010 10:40 pm

Re: mfw vs classical

Unread post by davidmendez5 » Thu Mar 18, 2010 10:19 pm

Donna, thank you so much for your excellent suggestions and prayers. I am going to print those out asap!

crystal,
Thank you so much for answering all my questions and taking the time to be so detailed. Being new to homeschooling is scary enough and when you feel like you are going to fail your kids makes it harder, then you question what you are doing??? As you pointed out, I see that MFW picks the best of the best in history, science, math, and bible. I just did not see a huge amount of time devoted to the things the Classical does. I really don't even understand it all. I know that God will show the way and I will have peace, as he has done in the past. I was really wanting to do MFW but I just have so much fear to cont. another year when this year has been so rough. Well the door closed to the school (math score not high enough) and God has given me such a vision of how differently we can live our lives as a family and not always focused on academics and test scores. I think some groups worship education and all it's benefits in this world. That's what we were doing, running the rat race and it was getting old. Could I be acting like the Israelites wanting to go back to Egypt out of fear and lack of trust? Thanks for listening.

Postby davidmendez5 » Tue Mar 23, 2010 9:31 am
great article crystal, i am reading Charlotte Mason Companion by Karen Andreola to understand her methods. To do something without examination and just because others are doing it has been my life until now.
thanks

Filitsa
Last edited by davidmendez5 on Fri Mar 19, 2010 12:00 am, edited 1 time in total.

Julie in MN
Posts: 2925
Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 3:44 pm
Location: Minnesota

Re: mfw vs classical

Unread post by Julie in MN » Thu Mar 18, 2010 11:34 pm

davidmendez5 wrote:How important is the logic and rhetoric courses in high school and does MFW do anything similar and maybe not call it by those names. Any advice would be so apprieciated.
Filitsa
I think you are onto something here. The same thing can be known by different names. Rhetoric, for instance, is simply the ability to communicate effectively, to grapple with ideas persuasively, to argue convincingly. There is no one method of accomplishing this. I've seen several homeschool curricula attempt to accomplish this goal in very different ways. One program has the student writing large volumes continually. Another provides parents with cheat sheets reproduced from the encyclopedia in order to promote higher levels of oral conversation. The goal of excellent communication seems valuable, but there is no single path to achieving that goal -- no magic book that will transport the child straight to the end-goal.

So far my experience with MFW is that they are teaching my child to understand important foundations of his faith as well as to have a strong sense of his larger world. He has developed these understandings in age-appropriate ways that encourage him to be interested and engaged in his education. MFW has not changed his nature, and he may never be the academic of his mom's dreams, but he has received a solid education with MFW over the last six years. He has gone through the entire history cycle, pretty much all branches of science, classical music, art humanities, journeyed through the entire Bible, and read good literature. Plus we've had extra room built in for following our own family's needs and passions and, well, our differences.

I feel confident as my youngest son enters high school next year that MFW will continue to develop in him the skills of rhetoric -- knowing both what he is communicating about and learning how to communicate it well. I also feel comfortable that I can use MFW in the way that works best in my home, adjusting methods to suit my needs, while still benefiting immensely from having a thoroughly planned out curriculum that has been tested by real kids in many different families. I really value the pilot families who have gone ahead of me, because they insure that the curriculum won't just speak to me as a parent, but the information and ideas will reach my student where he is at.

As for logic, that can be a very formal thing to study. My son is doing some logic with a "book club" as an elective in 8th grade, and we have easily had the time to do that on MFW's "light Fridays." I plan to use the MFW recommended logic books as a high school elective, too. But I must admit that I don't want to bury my son in it. Logic involves lots of strange arguments; one that irks me is that you must accept any conclusion as true if the premise is false, e.g. "If you are purple, then..." results in any conclusion being "a true statement." What?! (I look forward to the Bluedorn book as a change of pace.) But the point is that if you find you love logic, there is room for electives throughout MFW high school. :~

I know folks tend to think that MFW is light on academics. Most of us here will disagree with that. MFW is the right amount. It's real academics. It's do-able. It gets done. The Bible gets done, the music gets done, the science gets done, the copywork gets done. History doesn't get sidetracked. The child doesn't get totally burned out. The parent doesn't get totally burned out. They learn lots. Really ;)

Julie

Posted Thu Aug 20, 2015 10:56 pm by Julie in MN
MFW has many classical elements. There is some discussion on this thread: viewtopic.php?t=428
Especially read Dawn's post about how she uses many WTM techniques alongside MFW.

MFW methods that are common to classical education include:
- copywork and narration
- chronological history
- read-alouds and good literature
- using some of the materials written by Susan Wise Bauer

HTH,
Julie
Last edited by Julie in MN on Fri Mar 19, 2010 8:16 am, edited 1 time in total.
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

4Truth
Posts: 334
Joined: Fri Dec 17, 2004 11:59 am

Re: mfw vs classical

Unread post by 4Truth » Fri Mar 19, 2010 8:12 am

Julie in MN wrote:I know folks tend to think that MFW is light on academics.
And I will add that in my experience, as a 9th year homeschooler, almost 5 of which have been with MFW, and having engaged in many discussions on the internet over those years, what I've seen over and over again is that most people who say MFW is light on academics haven't even done their history cycle. Perhaps they've done a couple of the earlier years which ARE light (intentionally), but not followed through on the rest of it. Or they've dabbled in some of my MFW's programs but never really *completed* a program... and thus, have not stuck with it long enough to see the fruit. Well, the fruit is why we stick with MFW, even when I think about doing something else. Of course there are many reasons we stick with MFW, but I like what I'm seeing my girls as the direct result of using MFW. :) (Well really, it's the direct result of the Lord working in our family, but MFW is the tool that's brought both academics and spiritual growth together on the table for us.)

The thing about MFW is that the workload, the thinking skills and worldview, and the depth of study "grow" through the years. As your child grows and as your family grows, MFW grows with you. Does that make sense? So sometimes it's a little hard to see down the road when you're doing the lighter early years. But it is what it claims to be... and it does NOT claim to be fully classical, or fully CM. It's a balance.
Donna, with two MFW graduates and the "baby" in 11th grade! %| Using MFW since 2004.

cbollin

Re: mfw vs classical

Unread post by cbollin » Fri Mar 19, 2010 9:17 am

davidmendez5 wrote: Well the door closed to the school (math score not high enough) and God has given me such a vision of how differently we can live our lives as a family and not always focused on academics and test scores.
wow.. I read that last night and just wanted to hug your children and you. (((hugs)))).....

aren't we blessed to know that in our family schools we aren't closed out of being in the family due to math scores? I'm sorry the school makes decisions like that at the need to show everyone how strong they are. It sounds to be more like a bit of school yard bullying during Recess and PE class --- we'll pick the strong kids first and therefore win..... sigh...... God's word seems to say HE selects based on other values than what man looks at.

You get a beautiful opportunity to show your children they are just as valuable will do great and mighty things in school, life and in God's eyes while being taught at home. Being taught at home, in my opinion, is a "superior" (for lack of a better term) method due to the unconditional love of the teachers for the students, the low ratio of teacher to student, and being able to do things in real life. It's a dream land for group school teachers to have the ratios that we have.

praying for the vision for you. I hope you and your dh get to listen to many of David Hazell's workshops on that. The Hazell kids are smart adults and serve faithfully.
4Truth wrote:And I will add that in my experience, as a 9th year homeschooler, almost 5 of which have been with MFW, and having engaged in many discussions on the internet over those years, what I've seen over and over again is that most people who say MFW is light on academics haven't even done their history cycle.
that or they haven't done something like group exercise classes called "lite impact" or "interval circuit training" class. If they did -- they'd totally get MFW.

Once you do a "lite impact" or a "circuit style" class, you start to wonder why so many people don't attend it more often. You get a great workout -- at high intensity, but less impact on your knees and ankles. Your heart rate is still in the aerobic zones at the right times. You can concentrate longer on the strength training routines too.

In regular class -- I have the hardest time sticking with it until the end of class, and I lose the ability to stay focused on my ab work too so the technique becomes sloppy. And at the end of regular class (taught with those peppy ladies in their 20's) -- I'm so exhausted, it takes a long time to recover! But in the "lite impact" and/or "interval" class --- I do more, stay with it longer, and have good results, baby! I am able to return home full of life, energy and a peppy attitude! My instructor measures these things and find out that in low impact -- she actually burns more fat and calories than in regular class. huh? apparently so.

up the aerobic curve in small controlled ways, small intervals of strength training, back to cardio, and down the curve and end with a stretch...... sounds like a normal day in MFW manuals. ;) (well every analogy has its logical break down point LOL)

I realize the same analogy carries over with the perceived idea that MFW is somehow not enough. MFW offers just the right amounts, so that we can stick with it long term, concentrate on the "heart strength" in the program, still get a full workout. And usually even able to face the next day. It may be lighter impact on the day to day function with mom to get it done-- but it's high impact for the kingdom.

another odd thought....

you know one of the other reasons that some say MFW is not enough -- it doesn't take a long time. The group exercise classes I take have this special format called Express. in those 30 minutes classes which are taught at "regular/high impact with hops and vertical lift) , we work hard and sweat and get a solid full body workout (even with standing ab work!). I worked hard at that class today even with the low impact moves (with bounce instead of hop). sweat was pouring down my face into my eyes! (and I was near one of the fans). Then all of a sudden - - class was done! and I made it!

So, school doesn't have to take long either. and with MFW's "Charlotte Mason" influence in classical ed, it isn't going to take hours upon hours upon hours to get top results.

-crystal

dhudson
Posts: 320
Joined: Thu May 10, 2007 5:46 pm

Re: mfw vs classical

Unread post by dhudson » Fri Mar 19, 2010 10:09 am

I would consider myself a classical home schooler, I love the well-Trained Mind and the ideas of the many classical educators but I have also used MFW with all of my children from pre-K to the current school year. We love MFW and have it used it very successfully and my kids are very academic and score very well.

Here are some of the elements that are very classical in MFW -

1. Chronological History. MFW has three history cycles. I consider MFWK-2 a very loose history cycle but it does introduce ancient, reformation and modern history very carefully for those young ones.

2. Narrations and copywork. MFW incorporates these into their curriculum and your children start working on them in MFW1st.

3. MFW does have Grammar, Logic and Rhetoric stages. Remember that more than subjects for kids to take these are stages and MFW has these stages built into the curriculum. From K - RTR, I would say that the curriculum itself is firmly in the Grammar stage. In EXP to 1850 and 1850 to MOD the academics have stepped into the Logic stage, which is why they have supplements for siblings still in the Grammar stage (2-3rd grade supplements). The high school programs are very Rhetoric stage. The goal of a grammar stage to gain as much knowledge as possible and MFW does that. The goal of the Logic stage is to start knowing what to do with that info and MFW does that by increasing narrations, working and writing from outlines and in many of LA suggestions. The goal of the rhetoric stage is to be able to express thoughts and communicate them effectively. I spent a considerable amount of time looking at the MFW high school program and it will train our kids to do just that.

4. Languages. MFW recommends that you start a child in a foreign language in the Grammar stage. You can have that language be Latin. TWTM recommends that you start either with a modern language or Latin and then add the other later. MFW and TWTM are compatible.

5. Math. MFW and TWTM both recommend Singapore and Saxon.

6. Language Arts. MFW recommends PLL/ILL in the grammar stage and TWTM recommends FLL. Both are very similiar programs, FLL has more grammar added. Then in the logic stage a formal grammar program is recommended. They may be different programs recommended but they are similar programs. Writing Strands in the Logic stage is recommended in both programs.

7. Science. MFW and TWTM are in different order but you will cover the same material.

8. Overall MFW is a very classical programs and you can add in elements to make it even more classical. I have the freedom and time to add in more classical elements if I want but MFW has done the hard work for me. They have taken all these ideas and put them in an open and go format so I have time to add other things to them if I wish but I don't need to. Not to mention, as my main goal is to have children who love God, MFW's curriculum more than meet this. We want to have a Christian classical education not just a classical education and I love the Biblical tie ins that MFW has in all of its curriculum so that my children know that God is in History, Science, Geography, Cultures and everything else. In the end, that will matter more and it would be far more difficult for me to add those elements in by myself than it is to add a classical element in here or there.

Wow, this is a really long post from me. :~ Sorry! You can tell I have thought about this extensively!
God Bless,
Dawn
http://www.shiningexamples.blogspot.com
blessed Mom of three - 16, 13 & 13
happy user of MFW since 2002

davidmendez5
Posts: 4
Joined: Tue Mar 16, 2010 10:40 pm

Re: mfw vs classical

Unread post by davidmendez5 » Fri Mar 19, 2010 12:29 pm

Words can not express how touched I am by everyone's prayers and the time you have taken to explain so many things that have given me such encouragement. I have never posted before and hoped to get a few responses but never knew how much encouragement I would get from people I never met. You have opened my eyes not only to my concerns but also to the vision you have for your family and how MFW supports that. I feel so much more confident now .

I am hoping to go to a conference to here David speak and maybe talk to him in person. I have been so touched by his CDs. Many things he talks about is what I have had in my heart for awhile. Must be the hand of God.
Filitsa

Fly2Peace
Posts: 79
Joined: Tue Jan 03, 2006 7:36 pm

Re: mfw vs classical

Unread post by Fly2Peace » Fri Mar 19, 2010 2:00 pm

Just a thought to share, that actually comes from a friend of mine for which this has a much deeper meaning, "Are we raising them for Harvard, or for Heaven?" I guess I feel MFW prepares them for either, but the heaven part is the more important thing.
Fly2Peace (versus flying to pieces)

4Truth
Posts: 334
Joined: Fri Dec 17, 2004 11:59 am

Re: mfw vs classical

Unread post by 4Truth » Tue Mar 23, 2010 12:23 pm

Filitsa, you might also consider reading Miss Mason's original writings, which can be found here: http://www.amblesideonline.org/CM/toc.html

Likewise, MFW sells a book by Susan Schaeffer Macauley called For the Children's Sake, which is a good (and a bit shorter) summary of the CM methods. I like this book in particular because Mrs. Macauley has added a more biblical understanding to her interpretation and adds scripture proofs. Scroll down on this page to see it: http://www.mfwbooks.com/k.htm

You're a wise mom to be studying it for yourself. :)
Donna, with two MFW graduates and the "baby" in 11th grade! %| Using MFW since 2004.

Julie in MN
Posts: 2925
Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 3:44 pm
Location: Minnesota

Do you think that MFW...

Unread post by Julie in MN » Wed Apr 21, 2010 9:28 pm

mlbuchina wrote:Do you think that MFW... accomplishes these goals:

"An articulate student, who knows how to get info he needs and evaluate if for its accuracy.
A student who at least had a handshake with the "Great Books" that he will go back and read again and again.
A student with a passion in one particular area, something he knows he is good at, something he can do, learn more about, something that is his." ~Susan Wise Bower

I know that MFW is a wonderful blend of CM, Classical and Unit study, and we have loved it so far (K and 1st). I am just having a hard time seeing the "big picture" when it comes to my long term goals for my girls. I have been thinking about why I chose MFW, and the biggest thing is the Christian worldview. I LOVE how it keeps the Main Thing the main thing. However, (and I don't know if this is a case of "that grass sure looks greener on the other side!"), after reading more about classical education, and more pointedly the interconnectedness (gosh, is that a word???), between history, science and liturature, I have begun to wonder if a different approach would be better.

I really do love MFW (my catalog has about disintegrated from me pouring over it all the time), and I think I just need a little reassurance that this is the path to stay on. I can't really tell without the books in hand that this is what it accomplishes, and I wish I could buy it all now! LOL

ETA: I have ordered the workshop: What Should 21st Century Christians be Teaching Their Children? I can't wait for it to get here!
Hi Michele,
Wow, big questions! I love big questions :) But I probably shouldn't answer until I've thought about them for a few days :~

First of all, you've probably done this, but I wanted to be sure you've wandered around the boards for some previous answers, such as these:
http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=3109
http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=4098

Okay, I can't resist. So, thinking about my youngest ds, who's used MFW from 3rd through 8th grades and is ready to enter high school in the fall.

First of all, he's a boy. He's a 14-year-old. He's a youngest. He doesn't re-read books thus far. He doesn't remember everything he's learned over the years. He does have a passion about most things while he's doing them but not about any one particular thing (except snowboarding - he wants to write every paper about that!). So, no, your description doesn't describe my reality down to a T. Maybe it would have for my oldest, but not for all my kids. However, I don't believe any curriculum would change their natures completely or miraculously create an academe out of every one of my particular children. In fact, I'd be highly surprised if SWB's children were all as passionate as her lovely description :)

However, I can say that my youngest, after using MFW -

- has been enthralled by read-alouds that have brought him into specific time periods in history as well as into the lives and minds of important role models

- has had the time to read or listen to a wide variety of literature that was not specifically scripted but chosen according to his own random interests, the choices of a book club he has belonged to, and his mom's decisions about what classics he would be exposed to

- has had the room for mom to reserve many "classics" for later years, since they do not always include the greatest role models, and introduce them with guidance

- is probably the most knowledgeable kid in the neighborhood, including all his 9th grade ps friends (wink) ;) , at least about history (especially ancient & modern), Bible, geography, and grammar

- has already had a more solid, thorough education than I tried to give my older dd using Sonlight, Konos, Beautiful Feet, Diana Waring, and more (including my own endless research & planning)

- has had a much more engaged mom during school due to not having to do endless planning

- has "owned" his education, through notebooking and narration and conversation, rather than "filled it in & forgot it," which is what my oldest ds regrets from his own "advanced" academics in the ps system

- has had the time & preparation (& lack of burn-out) to delve deeply into math and language arts during 8th grade, including belonging to afternoon math club and book club

- has done well in all outside classes he has occasionally been involved in


Well, I'll be listening to this interesting conversation :)
Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

dhudson
Posts: 320
Joined: Thu May 10, 2007 5:46 pm

Re: Do you think that MFW...

Unread post by dhudson » Wed Apr 21, 2010 9:33 pm

I am a huge Susan Wise Bauer fan. I own the majority of her books and actually just drove 18 hours to see her speak at a conference. I love the TWTM model and incorporate that into much of our school. I am, at heart, a classical educator. That being said, I have done MFW all the way through and will finish 1850 to MOD in 3 weeks and will have done every single program they have excepting high school. I have also just spent three days(other than hearing SWB and JW) at a convention looking at every high school program I could find and comparing it to MFW. MFW stacks up academically as well as having ,imho, the best Bible and worldview programs. Hands-down the best. In the five year cycle MFW will more than meet the inter-connectedness needs of a classical education, in fact it will succeed it without you have to kill yourself over planning it.

When the newest TWTM came out, I spent two weeks writing down their plan and comparing it to MFW. For the most part MFW covers everything TWTM covers in a little different order. LA suggestions are a little different at times mostly because MFW chooses a more Charlotte Mason approach. Math suggestions are mostly the same as well as logic stage writing suggestions. MFW adds in roots programs although they suggest that you add a foreign language in as does TWTM. TWTM suggests that you do Latin but MFW lets you choose, so if you are a more classical bent, you do Latin. TWTM has a different order for the sciences in the grammar stage but all the sciences are basically the same, in just a different order. Logic and Rhetoric stage (MFW doesn't call them by these names but they are structured in the same way) science suggestions are basically the same. Narration, Dictation and Copywork are foundational in both. SOTW is used by MFW in all but 1 of it's history cycle. (MFW's reason why is a sound one ).

If you use the Deluxe read-alouds, the library book book basket and go through the classic suggestions in the back of the TM, your child will more than have a sound "Great Books" foundation. The high school program will also firmly cement that. If your child goes through MFW through high school they will have a strong academic background. IMHO, MFW gets more classical as the age and grade of the child grows. By high school MFW is very classical while still allowing the child time to focus on their interests which as I heard last weekend, is also what SWB suggests. The first three years of MFW is more of a Charlotte Mason feel, but I think for those ages they are appropriate. They teach a love of learning that will be needed as the child gets older. I can't imagine having a child who hates to learn in 7th grade and forcing them to do their work every day. My kids love to learn and a big part of that was the foundation that MFW gave them.

Can you tell I've done some research on this very topic? :-) In the end though, if my child has a classical education that Aristotle would be proud of but lacks a spiritual foundation and doesn't have a heart bent to God's will, it will be to naught. That's why we choose MFW every year because I want both, children who follow God's ways and a strong classical education. Well, that's more than I've written in two months of posts, so I'll end this now!
Last edited by dhudson on Wed Apr 21, 2010 10:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.
God Bless,
Dawn
http://www.shiningexamples.blogspot.com
blessed Mom of three - 16, 13 & 13
happy user of MFW since 2002

cbollin

Re: Do you think that MFW...

Unread post by cbollin » Wed Apr 21, 2010 9:35 pm

Given the number of high school students I personally know who have used MFW, you'll be fine. Have you ever been to a convention where MFW has some of those high school kids working in the booth?

Much of it is also in the hands of teachers/tutor and asking God to fill in the missing parts and may or may not have to do with “curriculum”.

Yes – MFW has the right tools for that. MFW is a classical program. MFW uses Story of the World (written by SWB). MFW uses many of the same ideas.

Remember that is a life time of teaching goals that SWB is talking about. It will take time and look different in various stages of learning.

Let’s break it down a bit
mlbuchina wrote:An articulate student, who knows how to get info he needs and evaluate if for its accuracy
Will using MFW’s style of classical give you opportunities to produce articulate students?
Yes – that’s through a lot of narration techniques. Now you could just let them get away with grunts and one word answers, but ask for complete sentences during narration.
Yes, that’s through a lot of the writing programs. At high school level materials with argumentative essays, you’ll be given the opportunity to refine that skill.
So – those things that are in SWB’s stuff are part of MFW.

And remember too – MFW uses Story of the World (written by Susan Wise Bauer)

You don’t have to do Latin in order to produce articulate students. But in MFW you can if you want to.

Yes – kids do research in MFW programs. (knowing how to get info he needs).
Evaluating for accuracy? Yes – because MFW doesn’t use just one source for spines, you end up having to filter out bias and look things up from time to time. Students are encouraged to see it against God’s word. One other way this is "evaluate" for accuracy -- done with logic training books too. and MFW includes that in the program
A student who at least had a handshake with the "Great Books" that he will go back and read again and again. /quote]
They’ll be given those handshakes. I don’t think anyone can guarantee that anyone will go back and read again and again. My kids do. I don’t claim that all kids will be passionate readers just because they are individuals and not cookie cutters. Even kids given the handshakes might just stay at handshake.
Great Books in MFW: Bible,

Oh yeah, there’s others too. In the back of each manual is a listing of Classical children’s literature for elementary/middle school. That’s what’s called “reading time”. Then, they’ll get some other great books in book basket. Many of those titles will also appear in SWB’s lists in her activity books.
In CTG – they’re getting Children’s Homer. They get Aesop fables. They get Old Testament to read again and again.
RTR – you even get to introduce Shakespeare.
EX1850, 1850MOD – you give them handshakes on other great readings.
High school – very great books in the program, then if you do the SAT prep book as part of English credit…. 150 great books.

It’s in there.

I have a kid who loves to read and has thrived in MFW. I have a kid who enjoys reading and likes it too.
A student with a passion in one particular area, something he knows he is good at, something he can do, learn more about, something that is his.
That’s where the Charlotte Mason part of MFW comes into play. You see, in MFW, we are given the opportunity every day to develop their interests. That’s why the schedules recommend try to be done by noon. That way you have time to devote to Productive Afternoons to develop interest and self motivation. Let them try stuff they like. Let them try new things. Do service together. Oh yeah, high school? They learn this again in service projects.

My oldest – wants to go to Russia. She knows she’s good at learning that language. She knows she is good at archery. She knows she is good at science and math. And she likes to crochet.

Middle gal – wants to go to China. She knows she’s good at art stuff, dancing, and loves nature.

Youngest – that kid has autism. I don’t know what she knows about anything. But that’s not SWB or MFW’s fault.
dhudson wrote: In the end though, if my child has a classical education that Aristotle would be proud of but lacks a spiritual foundation and doesn't have a heart bent to God's will, it will be to naught.
another comment on that..... this week in CTG, week 34, we're learning about a student of Aristotle, who was named Alexander the Great. Now, he "gained the whole world", but lost his soul. My oldest picked up on it pretty quick. We were reading how he wanted to blend cultures --- but lost his roots while doing so and took on the bad habits of the other cultures. and in the end.... he lost it all. he wasn't the king of kings or son of god that he thought he was.. We were thankful that MFW had extra scriptures to read about God's rule is without end. Maybe Aristotle should have had his student, Alexander, read the Hebrew scriptures more?

don't know why I brought that up. But my 8th grader was making some fine connections today in CTG.

-crystal
Last edited by cbollin on Thu Apr 22, 2010 4:25 pm, edited 2 times in total.

club190
Posts: 27
Joined: Wed Mar 31, 2010 9:12 am

Re: Do you think that MFW...

Unread post by club190 » Thu Apr 22, 2010 10:42 am

Hi Michele,

I probably shouldn't answer this question since I have not yet started using MFW. What I can offer you though is a comparison to another program through what we did for my oldest son and how we wrestled through deciding what to do for our second son.

We too loved TWTM. It came out when we were in our early homeschooling years. We were doing the Noah Plan (back in the days when mom planned and planned and planned some more) but went with the four year cycle that TWTM espoused. We did a combo of the two. Then when we got to the high school years, all that great interdisciplinary stuff in the Noah Plan was simply gone and we felt lost. We had come to love all the interconnectedness that we had in our learning times so we switched. We did a lot of different things in those years and struck out on our own. And it was good.

Here's what we learned. First and foremost, our plans are not God's plans and He delights in having His way with His plans for our children. We were content to go the CLEP route with a job and some college courses at the local community college for the first year after graduation,. We figured that since this child really didn't know what he was going to do there was no reason to do more. Give him time to explore and find direction, then the second year after graduation we'd likely do CollegePlus. Again, we wanted to maximize his learning time and minimize out of pocket expenses. Well, to make a long story short, we did apply to two colleges, just to say we did it, and just to appease our evaluator. I sent in what I had to send in, and let it go. I never expected them to come back with acceptance letters, I certainly never expected them to come back with such huge financial packages either. On April Fool's day we received a life changing letter from one of them -- $43K in scholarships! On the 9th we went down there to check the place out and I have to tell you, all 5 of us in the family came away from that day feeling like this is the place for our son, like they will take over where we left off, and not undo all the hard work we put into him. So, was that our plan? Not at all. Is this God's plan? We think so. Why? We all have peace over it. We can afford what is left on the package, it will be tight, but we can do it. And third, after we wrote the deposit check, we received that much back in the mail in a check we had long since written off as never coming, and got a phone call about another check that we were not expecting, thus already covering our first two month's payments to the school!

So, that's how the Lord worked things out for our oldest son, now for the second son. "So if it worked for one kid why not keep going?" you may rightly ask. Well, the short story is that this child in question is a serious dyslexic child who only learned to read at age 12 -- he's 14 now and making great strides, but he still cannot handle the reading or vocabulary of the great books to that extent. It would kill both of us! He needs more order in his day, he needs to do one book at a time, he needs more cohesiveness to his studies, more time to process what he's learning and you just can't get that if you're jumping around from book to book. Enter MFW. We're doing ECC at the 8th grade level for him, but giving him high school credit for it, then we;ll do Ancients then world and then finish up his senior year with some of the American offerings. He will still get the great ideas, albeit, fewer of them, but he will have more of a chance to assimilate the information because there's not such an overabundance of reading in the MFW courses. I like depth rather than breadth for this child. Breadth will come later on, but not now, now he needs time to let the ideas become a part of him. He also needs more of a spiritual boost, he needs to learn about other people and how the Lord is at work all around the world. He needs to gain a heart of compassion for the hurting people around the world, to be moved to pray for them and to provide for their material needs. We have such abundance here, and he needs to realize that in a big way, and what better way than to focus on the various cultures and their needs. He needs to develop a hunger for spiritual things and what better way then to spend more time in the Word of God while learning about the contrast of the pagans of the ancient world.

In no other curriculum does a student read the whole Bible in two years in high school, parts yes, but the whole thing, nowhere. I've looked!

So that's my answer to you. After much prayer, many hours of research, and just my "gut," here we are, at MFW for the second child, for the duration of his high school time. Now to figure out a plan for the third child! We'll see, he's still very young so we have time before we have to decide anything for him!

Blessings,
Chris
Wife to Jim since '91
Mom to:
Matthew, 18, Ursinus College student
Andrew, 14, ECC 7/8 + a few extras to make it "official" for high school credit
Daniel, 5, wanting to "do school" but still not really ready

mlbuchina
Posts: 8
Joined: Fri May 29, 2009 9:15 pm

Re: Do you think that MFW...

Unread post by mlbuchina » Thu Apr 22, 2010 3:41 pm

Thank you, thank you , thank you, Ladies! I just knew ya'll would have encouraging words and timely information.
dhudson wrote:Can you tell I've done some research on this very topic? :-) In the end though, if my child has a classical education that Aristotle would be proud of but lacks a spiritual foundation and doesn't have a heart bent to God's will, it will be to naught. That's why we choose MFW every year because I want both, children who follow God's ways and a strong classical education. Well, that's more than I've written in two months of posts, so I'll end this now!
This is exactly how I feel. I just needed you to put it in words for me! :-)

Thank you, Crystal, for that breakdown. I knew someone who had gone before me would have the big picture and be able to share it. That really makes it more firm in my mind. I always seem to really start doubting myself about this time of year. I love the connections made by your 8th grader. THIS is the kind of stuff I'm wondering about. Most of the time, I don't even make them! :~ I find myself being educated as I educate them. This is the kind of education I would have loved to have had! (Well, that is speaking as an adult looking back... lol)

Thank you, Chris, for sharing your story. It is a wonderful reminder that God is in control, and I don't have to worry about it. Just talk to Him and trust in Him. Brings to mind the last Proverb we studied in MFW 1st this year: Many are the plans in a man's heart, but it is the LORD's purpose that prevails. Proverbs 19:21.

When I read TWTM in Feb. last year, it really clicked with me in that it is so my teaching style. It understood me unlike any of the other homeschooling method/information books I had read before. I actually had found MFW long before I had even heard about TWTM, and I loved what I saw and read on their website (back in 2007). I think I try to plan/think ahead way too much, and I really need to live in this moment. No reason to rush off to the highschool years, when I need to be enjoying the discoveries of these elementary years.

Thanks again, everyone. I think the Lord has to hit me over the head sometimes. lol
Michele
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Wife to Sailor Hubby for almost 14 years
Mom to DD6 (7) and DD4 (almost 5!)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
MFWK~done and about to go again
MFW1st~done
Adv.~beginning this upcoming school year

momtogc
Posts: 78
Joined: Fri Sep 07, 2007 11:25 pm
Location: AR

Re: Do you think that MFW...

Unread post by momtogc » Sun Apr 25, 2010 4:11 pm

That workshop cd is what answered all my questions. Before that, I was really confused - wavering back and forth....are we "missing something" if we don't take TWTM route? It didn't help that my cousin and his wife, who were pioneers in homeschooling (homeschooled their three children thirty years ago, all of whom are now grown, two are married with kids of their own), now work in a Classical private school. There was, initially, some "pressure", you know the comparisons between what their grands are learning in school with what my dd is learning (some verbalized by members of the family, some in my own mind). Ultimately for us though, the Christian worldview was the deciding factor.

We have only two years with MFW under our belt but we plan, if it's the Lord's will, to keep going with MFW. Even though we have only done MFW-1 and almost done with ADV, I can already see that the proof is in the pudding. imho, MFW is a curriculum rich in a lot of things: Bible focus, ministry, academics....the list goes on. I wouldn't trade it for anything, and if it helps you to know, it wasn't until we were neck deep into ADV that I really made that conscious decision. I think before that we were focused on building reading and math foundations, etc. Adventures took us down different paths. FWIW, my eight year old has cried a lot over the past two weeks about "being almost finished with school". She has loved Adventures, has learned a lot, and doesn't want it to end.

Right now, she is playing Battleship with her Dad, who is retired Navy, and is telling him about Robert Fulton, the inventor of the diving boat. :-) Not a "Classical" moment but a MFW moment! I love it!

HTH!
Mom to Gabi, a fun-loving and happy girl!
MFW 1st, Adventures, ECC, CTG, RTR, Exp-1850

mlbuchina
Posts: 8
Joined: Fri May 29, 2009 9:15 pm

Re: Do you think that MFW...

Unread post by mlbuchina » Sun Apr 25, 2010 10:22 pm

momtogc wrote:That workshop cd is what answered all my questions. Before that, I was really confused - wavering back and forth....are we "missing something" if we don't take TWTM route?
This was me. I received the workshop cd in the mail the other day, and it really does answer those questions. I am so thankful! I'm very greatful that I am having these questions answered now, and not many years later. I do wish that I had listened to this a year or so ago. Now I feel like we need to go back through 1st to REALLY ground ourselves in the Bible teachings from it. Luckily, I do have another dc to go through it, so we will get to do it again.
We have only two years with MFW under our belt but we plan, if it's the Lord's will, to keep going with MFW.
Yes, and I hope that His plan is for us to use it all the way through. I need it for me, too!
FWIW, my eight year old has cried a lot over the past two weeks about "being almost finished with school". She has loved Adventures, has learned a lot, and doesn't want it to end.
I hope this will happen for us! LOL I know I am very excited about it. I love American History. This will probably be ME at the end of the year! :-)
Right now, she is playing Battleship with her Dad, who is retired Navy, and is telling him about Robert Fulton, the inventor of the diving boat. :-) Not a "Classical" moment but a MFW moment! I love it! HTH!
Oh, that's so cute! My dh has about 5 years, and then he can be retired Navy. And, yes, this helps a lot!! Thank you so much for sharing!
Michele
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Wife to Sailor Hubby for almost 14 years
Mom to DD6 (7) and DD4 (almost 5!)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
MFWK~done and about to go again
MFW1st~done
Adv.~beginning this upcoming school year

dhudson
Posts: 320
Joined: Thu May 10, 2007 5:46 pm

Re: Do you think that MFW...

Unread post by dhudson » Mon Apr 26, 2010 5:18 pm

Just as an additional confirmation and maybe a bit of brag :), my kids had their personal evaluations today ( in CO every other year we need to test or have an evaluation and we decided to evaluate instead this year) and did extremely well. The evaluator was surprised at their reading and comprehension ability (using MFW from pre-K til now) which tested far above their grade levels. Their math was above as well (having used most of MFW's suggestions through the years). Their writing ability was evaluated highly and it was obvious that their skills in narration, dictation and summaries (we have used a majority of MFW suggestions with a few additions) came in handy today. I have added a few more classical elements but the bones of our school is and always has been MFW and the majority of it's suggestions and today that showed positively in a very concrete way. MFW is an academically challenging and rigorous program and will teach your kids the skills they need. MFW blesses us in so many ways!
God Bless,
Dawn
http://www.shiningexamples.blogspot.com
blessed Mom of three - 16, 13 & 13
happy user of MFW since 2002

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