Academics - Retention methods? Learning styles?

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Julie in MN
Posts: 2928
Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 3:44 pm
Location: Minnesota

Academics - Retention methods? Learning styles?

Unread post by Julie in MN » Wed Dec 03, 2008 9:47 pm

aimee wrote:How do you measure/gauge what your child is retaining?
MFW includes a lot of methods for reviewing and retaining information. The notebook will be the crowning jewel, which you can show to dh & others. However, there are also built-in games to play to retain information, hands-on activities which often are better retained by children, as well as doing things in multiple ways such as using a timeline.

Here are a few more ideas on that:
http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php?t=1127
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

cbollin

Re: Retention

Unread post by cbollin » Thu Dec 04, 2008 3:42 pm

How do you measure/gauge what your child is retaining? My DH wants to make sure that they are actually learning, have some goals, etc. So far, it is not going very well. My job as teacher is on the line here and I want to make sure we find a good fit.
Aimee
At this age (7 and 5) in my house, we don’t fret about retention of science and history facts. We look things up all the time. Learning is not about spewing out memorized lists. You will know that they retain things because they are learning to read and write. At this age, I think you and your dh should be looking for progression of Skills and retention of skills.

Just one very strong opinion out there about it. In later years the retention comes from a lot of hands on learning and just talking out loud. Also, we don’t memorize our timeline in my house. It is on display and we learn how to look things up. That is more important to me. As they get older, the retention of science and history comes along.

A lot of things in MFW help with retention. There are hands on activities that help cement the facts. There are timelines. History is taught chronologically.
Julie in MN wrote: MFW includes a lot of methods for reviewing and retaining information. The notebook will be the crowning jewel, which you can show to dh & others.
I agree!!! with that. My kids might not be able to have instant recall within 2 seconds of being quizzed by others, but pull out the notebooks and games and they can show you all they learned and talk for longer.

-crystal

dhudson
Posts: 320
Joined: Thu May 10, 2007 5:46 pm

Learning styles and MFW

Unread post by dhudson » Mon Jan 04, 2010 8:31 pm

sarah wrote:I have been given a lot of welcomed advice about how to approach homeschooling in general but the two thing I've hear the most from other homeschoolers:
1. Don't push your kids- take it slow in the early years and then they will take off
2. Find your child's learning style and use that to pick your curriculum.
Got number one, still working on number 2. I've read some about learning styles but can't really tell which my son prefers. I think he may just be too young to tell or really is one of those kids who can use them all. Anyway, what tips do you have for finding your child's learning style? Does MFW pretty evenly appeal to all of them or is it heavier towards a certain one? I'm talking the early years.
I have three children with dramatically different personalities and learning styles and MFW has worked beautifully for all three from K all the way through the history cycle. We have used all the MFW programs except high school as my oldest is in 7th.

For my oldest who is a visual learner, there is enough books to keep him interested and intrigued. My daughter who is very kinetic, loved all the hands-on projects and for her twin brother, who is fairly auditory, loves all the read alouds. MFW works very hard to cover all the learning styles and accomplishes it.
God Bless,
Dawn
http://www.shiningexamples.blogspot.com
blessed Mom of three - 16, 13 & 13
happy user of MFW since 2002

cbollin

Re: Learning styles and MFW

Unread post by cbollin » Mon Jan 04, 2010 9:14 pm

I agree with Dawn. MFW uses multiple methods so you’ll be covered even if you never really figure out which learning style fits your child for the stage they are currently in. I have 3 kids with different styles and MFW can be used with them. My youngest even has learning issues due to autism.

I’ve been homeschooling for just over a decade. I have 8th, 5th and 1st graders. Been using MFW since 2003.

I think curriculum should be chosen based on bigger picture goals such as what do you want your children to know, and what is God calling you to use. Then, after you find your child’s style that makes it easier to learn material, you teach them leaning toward that learning style from whatever curriculum fits your life goals. Learning styles can change a bit through life. Multisensory items can help lots of people. Some of us never bother finding the perfect learning style.

Many times I am thankful that MFW isn’t about one learning style. That way I can use a strength that my child has to help develop other strengths and hopefully balance their learning over a lifetime.

-crystal

Julie in MN
Posts: 2928
Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 3:44 pm
Location: Minnesota

Re: Learning styles and MFW

Unread post by Julie in MN » Mon Jan 04, 2010 11:37 pm

sarah wrote:2. Find your child's learning style and use that to pick your curriculum.
I agree with the others, that MFW works for all learning styles.

And I don't think you really need to worry about identifying it unless you see a problem. If your child is having a problem understanding or remembering or something, then learning styles might be a tool to help solve that problem. Otherwise, really we all have a little of every learning style. And we all need to strengthen every learning style in case we need it in the future. So you'll be fine :)

Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

sarah
Posts: 13
Joined: Thu Dec 31, 2009 10:17 pm

Re: Learning styles and MFW

Unread post by sarah » Tue Jan 05, 2010 9:10 am

Thanks, you ladies make some really good points. I love the idea that you find the content and then worry about the style- I mean isn't the content ultimately what's important for how your children turn out. I have also thought, "Well shouldn't children be able to be taught to learn in different modes?" I mean that is the "real world" and it seems it would be good for their minds. But it's wonderful to know that I can make MFW bend towards one or the other when I think it's needed. I really do think my son may learn best when they are all used or at least that's what I tend to see right now. But all the stuff I've read on learning styles say that's pretty unusual (though it can be true in a few kids) and that most kids really do have one they learn best with. So I was doubting myself and wondering if it's some magic bullet that can make learning super easy or something. Maybe I'll just quit worrying about it now and see if I need to worry about it in K. That would be one less book I have read between now and our official start. :-)

doubleportion
Posts: 201
Joined: Tue Apr 15, 2008 7:27 pm
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Re: Learning styles and MFW

Unread post by doubleportion » Wed Jan 06, 2010 11:43 am

If you want to know more about learning styles, Cynthia Tobias has a great book called "The Way They Learn." Might help if you want just more specs about each learning style. I will say knowing your child's dominant learning style can help you tweek things when you hit a speed bump. For us it was math. Dd is auditory and she needed to have things a little outside the box to "get it".

I will say that I did a learning style assessment on myself in college in an education class and was also one of the few that had all four styles pretty evenly, (professor even made me do it again because he didn't believe it at first). BUT I still found that certain subjects clicked best through my more visual side. I will say auditory was the weaker of the four for me but not by much.

But all that to say that MFW is very balanced on teaching all four styles. That is hard to come by in the curriculum world. Having a BE I have seen allot that is out there. MFW is still one of the best!!!
HTH
:)
Edie

dhudson
Posts: 320
Joined: Thu May 10, 2007 5:46 pm

Re: Learning styles and MFW

Unread post by dhudson » Wed Jan 06, 2010 1:00 pm

cbollin wrote:Does anyone else think that when our children will be teaching our grandchildren, they will be even more ready to teach different styles of learners if they have a balance of styles from their own childhood to recall? Is it possible that maybe this helps with some leadership skills in our children to see things in different ways and work with other personalities? Just wondering out loud.... I don't know. it's hypothetical question.
-crystal
Good point, Crystal! Not only do I think that our children will teach to others having different learning styles, I think that when (if) they go to college that they have to be able to learn in different ways because I don't think college professors will teach to one child's learning style. Yes, it's important to know what our child's learning style is but it's also really important to teach them to learn in a style that is different from the one they are most comfortable with. We all have little tricks when we have to learn in a style different from our own and I think we have to help our children with that. We need to teach them how to learn not only what they should learn. ;)

Okay, off my soap box and onto making a King's Cake!
God Bless,
Dawn
http://www.shiningexamples.blogspot.com
blessed Mom of three - 16, 13 & 13
happy user of MFW since 2002

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