Book Reviews & Extras - Elementary Boys

My Father's World uses a Book Basket method to develop a love of learning and enrich all subjects; Independent Reading Time has different goals and methods but there is overlap in book lists and helpful hints
4monkeyz
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Re: OT: Boys' Reading

Unread post by 4monkeyz » Thu Nov 07, 2013 9:10 am

A little late of a response here - but I thought I would chime in with two books my ds (9 yo) has finished and really enjoyed. These are the books he read and then said, "Mom you have to read this! It is so good." So I have read these too.... :)

Rascal by Sterling North - There is one swear word half-way through the book, but it isn't in conversation more a sign that is posted. Not that that makes it any better. However, this book is very good, I thought it was well written and extremely interesting. My ds and I talked about the ending...

Phantom Tollbooth, Norton Juster - He got the basic layer of imagery, but there is so much more in here!

Daniel at the Siege of Boston - Laurie Calkhoven -- I posted somewhere else this book, really good. There is a sequel "Will at the Battle of Gettysburg" which we are in the process of reading. I didn't find anything objectionable and my dh is a former history teacher he thought the snippets I read to him were good.

Mary Poppins -- Okay. I haven't read this one yet. He liked them and I have the first one on my nightstand to read.

We also just got from the library "My Side of the Mountain" - he loves this book, second or third time we have brought it home, but I haven't read it yet either. The stack is getting high! :-)
Andrea ~ Christ-Follower, Blessed Wife, Mama of 4
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mommyofmany
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Re: OT: Boys' Reading

Unread post by mommyofmany » Thu Nov 07, 2013 2:52 pm

Thanks for the recommendations! We'll check them out! :)
Blessings,
Emily- mommy to ds(21), dd(18), ds(11), ds(10 w/Down syndrome), dd(7), dd(5), & dd(2).

4monkeyz
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OT: Books for Advanced 10 yo Boy

Unread post by 4monkeyz » Sun Jul 20, 2014 3:35 pm

My son is 10 & he just read through Tolkien's The Hobbit. In one evening and one day. Loved it. Followed and understood it. Now he's reading Swiss Family Robinson....He has read everything that I approve of at our library, I am constantly requesting books from other libraries and reading some of the strangest titles. But I feel like I am running out of options!! Which as an English Major I know is not true. :)

So, what are books that you would recommend for an advanced 10 yo reader?? We have read Storybound by Marissa Burt, Incorrigible Children series, Narnia, Sherlock Files.....Last year from the month of May to the month of Nov. he read over 200 books. It is getting hard to keep up with him!! Any ideas is appreciated. :-)

And what about Henty?? Is there any easy one to start with???
Andrea ~ Christ-Follower, Blessed Wife, Mama of 4
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Poohbee
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Re: OT: Books for Advanced 10 yo Boy

Unread post by Poohbee » Sun Jul 20, 2014 4:09 pm

Has he read Chuck Black's books? Those are really good!

I have not read Henty, but I've heard great things about them. I would definitely check those out.

When I am searching for books for my kids to read, I look in resources such as Honey for a Child's Heart, Read for the Heart (by Sarah Clarkson), The Read Aloud Handbook, and other such books which contain lists and reviews of books. Also, just looking through the Rainbow Resource catalog and the Christian Book Distributors catalog can give you some ideas. And, of course, check out the lists of books for general reading in the back of the MFW TMs. :-)
Jen
happily married to Vince (19 yrs)
blessed by MFW since 2006
have used every year K-1850MOD
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MelissaB
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Re: OT: Books for Advanced 10 yo Boy

Unread post by MelissaB » Sun Jul 20, 2014 4:39 pm

YWAM Publishing has over 80 biographies, from missionaries to historical figures. They're well written and full of adventure. Our daughter's read around 40 biographies so far… (Buy in bulk. :) )
Melissa B. (Arkansas)
Girls ages 16 & 13
Completed K, 1st, and Investigate {ECC; CTG; RTR; Expl.-1850; and 1850-Mod. Times}
"That they may teach the young women to be sober, to love their husbands, to love their children,.." Titus 2:4

Julie in MN
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Re: OT: Books for Advanced 10 yo Boy

Unread post by Julie in MN » Mon Jul 21, 2014 11:32 pm

I agree with YWAM and Chuck Black. And with the book lists mentioned, which should be helpful. Plus your MFW manual will have a list of "classics" after the book basket list.

There may also be some more suggestions on these threads:
Books for elementary boys: http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php?f=30&t=3868
Books for 6th-8th, this post by Charlene in particular: http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php ... 543#p88364

You mentioned Henty. If he takes to those, then you will have reading matter for a good while. The fact that he's read The Hobbit is a good sign, since both authors are British. However, Henty has possibly the longest sentences I've ever read, so I'd try one before you get a pile of them. If the first one is difficult, you might use the Jim Hodges audio version as a teaser to get him interested (these are the full-length audios, not the shortened Jim Weiss ones). I've listened on car trips and Jim Hodges handles Henty well. Your library might have an audio or two, as Henty is a classic author. Here's a thread discussing Henty, as well:
http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php?f=30&t=6794

Have fun with your young reader,
Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
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4monkeyz
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Re: OT: Books for Advanced 10 yo Boy

Unread post by 4monkeyz » Tue Jul 22, 2014 7:48 am

Thanks everyone! I will have to check the library for Chuck Black books & maybe a Henty. Julie - crazy as it seems he has read most of the books listed in the back of my TM!! Exceptions would be he hasn't read any horse books (I think bcs. there is a girl at our church who absolutely adores horses) or any of the more girl books like Anne of Green Gables or Polyanna. Although maybe I should make him read one or two classics, like Black Stallion. He did just finish Swiss Family Robinson and he loved My Side of the Mountain. Ahem. Notice a theme? Ha. My son likes survivor adventure stories! :-) I will look closer at the list though, I did see some he hasn't read yet - 21 Balloons comes to mind. I think he is reading Treasure Island, I loved that book as a kid. :) Anyways, thanks again. I will check the links out too.

ps. StoryBound by Marissa Burt is a very good book. Kind of sci fi but we liked it.
Andrea ~ Christ-Follower, Blessed Wife, Mama of 4
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abrightmom
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Re: OT: Books for Advanced 10 yo Boy

Unread post by abrightmom » Tue Jul 22, 2014 2:24 pm

My boys (ages 10 and 11) have enjoyed Jenny Cote's series. The first two books are Max and Liz. The series continues with a new name: the Epic Order of the Seven. We are eagerly awaiting the publishing of her next book in the series.

We absolutely devoured the Viking Quest series. Excellent and highly recommended.
the Jungle Doctor series (missionary stories; more challenging language).
-Katrina-

DS15, DS14, DD12, DS8

4monkeyz
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Re: OT: Books for Advanced 10 yo Boy

Unread post by 4monkeyz » Fri Aug 08, 2014 6:45 am

Update: I have gotten several books from the library, more coming, and I wanted to post an update.

One of the books I previewed was the first in the Chuck Black series and I actually liked it, but I don't think my 10 yo is ready for it quite yet. It was intriguing, kind of pulls the reader in, but it was rather graphic so I'm going to hold off on this one for now. Another one was Dragonspell, again this might be better for a 7-8th grader.

However, our Library Director recommend Gulliver's Travels which my son is enjoying and the library actual has Hittite Warrior!! I haven't read it yet, but it looks interesting. The library director was telling me they just ordered several books off of a homeschool list which she is going to share with me, so I'm excited to see the library is getting new books in that aren't just monster orientated. :)

Postby 4monkeyz » Thu Aug 14, 2014 6:45 am

Another Update!! We received via the library the first two books in the Viking Quest series & I really like them! It is the Raiders from the Sea series by Lois Walfrid Johnson. I have only read the first one, but it was a quick read and I really liked that it is historical fiction as well as having a Biblical undertone to it. The emphasis from the first was that God will never leave and that God's plan can be different than ours. A very good book! :)
Andrea ~ Christ-Follower, Blessed Wife, Mama of 4
  • Adventures & First 2012
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Julie in MN
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Re: OT: Books for Advanced 10 yo Boy

Unread post by Julie in MN » Thu Aug 14, 2014 8:10 pm

Andrea, I'm loving your updates. And I'm sure your posts will be appreciated by many others who ask similar questions. It's great you post your reviews right away, while they are fresh in your mind.

Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
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kw4blessings
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OT: need book suggestion for co-op book club/activities

Unread post by kw4blessings » Thu Aug 28, 2014 8:05 pm

Yodergoat wrote:HI volunteered to teach a class. :~ Not sure why, but I get excited about things! Years ago, this group did a "book club" sort of class in which the children read a book and then did related activities. It sounds enjoyable, but I'm having a hard time deciding on a book that would appeal to the age range (probably K-4) and both genders. The class will last an hour and a half and we will meet twice a month. I plan to read portions of the book aloud as time permits and then do a related activity or project. I'm picturing activities such as making an item from the story, cooking a dish that's mentioned, etc. In the past, the class did Charlotte's Web and they ended their semester-long study by making dioramas of a farmyard.

Having a daughter, I am unsure of what sorts of books would appeal to boys also. And it must be a book which includes a variety of elements which could be used for activities. I'd be in my comfort zone if it was a book with a nature/outdoors/olden days theme.

Any book suggestions?
Thanks!
Little House in the Big Woods comes to mind. It seems to be written for a little bit of a younger audience than the other little house books and would definitely fall into the nature, outdoor, olden days category. There would be tons of activities, yummy dishes in there you could do.

Sounds like a fun class! Let us know which book you end up choosing. :)
Kelly, blessed mama to
sweet girl 10, busy boys 8, 6, 3
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Yodergoat
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Re: OT: need book suggestion for co-op book club/activities

Unread post by Yodergoat » Thu Aug 28, 2014 9:18 pm

For Little House in the Big Woods, I could just picture us blowing up a pig bladder balloon or roasting a pig tail... or bringing a bear's pelt (I have access to one) for them to feel when we talk about Ma smacking the bear when she thought it was the cow! There are so many possibilities there!

Still, not sure how it would appeal to boys, but it seems adventuresome enough for boys with Pa and wolves and danger and panther stories and such. I will consider this one but would appreciate other ideas...
I'm Shawna...
... a forgiven child of God since 1994 (age 16)
... happily wed to William since 1996
... mother of our long-awaited Gail (3/15/2006)
... missing 6 little ones (4 miscarriages, 2 ectopics)
... starting Rome to the Reformation this fall!

Julie in MN
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Re: OT: need book suggestion for co-op book club/activities

Unread post by Julie in MN » Thu Aug 28, 2014 10:49 pm

Hi Shawna,
I love book discussions, as you probably know, but a group of kindergarteners and even grades 1-2 leaves me stumped. Not only will some not be able to read the books, but I found my ds wasn't able to keep track of story-lines for long enough to get to the "moral"; he often stopped paying attention to the heart of a story while something bad was going on! I like picture books in those grades, and there are many that have activities, such as How to Bake an Apple Pie and See the World.

One very easy chapter book that sometimes has recipes in it is Nate the Great (ECC gives recommendations on which ones in the series have questionable topics), but it is not old-fashioned, just popular with goofy boys. A similar goofy boy themed book which is more old-fashioned (but quite a bit longer) is Homer Price, where he tries to "help" make donuts and the machine won't stop, etc.

Flat Stanley is a popular read-aloud in schools with the main "activity" being to send Stanley to relatives and have them send photos of his "trips."

If it's a homeschooling group, then maybe Summer with the Moodys, which isn't old-fashioned but has very Christian behavior and activities might include service to others. Similar but shorter stories would be in the sets A Hive of Busy Bees and The Miller Family.

If the kids are all into animals, there are some sweet series, and maybe some animal-related activities, although some families are not into talking animals (Janet Oke, Cynthia Rylant, and Billy & Blaze series). Wayne Grover writes more realistic stories on dolphins.

I'd assume you've looked at the list of "classics" in the back of your manual, as well as different book basket and other books with possibly related activities in each manual?

Not sure I happened upon anything that sounds perfect for that age span, but fun to join in on the book conversation ;)
Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

DS4home
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Re: OT: need book suggestion for co-op book club/activities

Unread post by DS4home » Fri Aug 29, 2014 12:01 am

If they have done Charlotte's Web, maybe another E.B. White book would be fun. How about The Trumpet of the Swan or Stuart Little?

Dawn
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hsm
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Re: OT: need book suggestion for co-op book club/activities

Unread post by hsm » Fri Aug 29, 2014 7:52 am

I had similar thoughts that Julie and Dawn had.....Homer Price, Stuart Little, and Billy and Blaze.
Lori-IL
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Yodergoat
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Re: OT: need book suggestion for co-op book club/activities

Unread post by Yodergoat » Fri Aug 29, 2014 2:30 pm

Thanks for the input and suggestions. I know that the age range starts pretty young for a lengthy book... sometimes I forget that not all kindergarteners like to listen to read-alouds like Gail did at that age. :~

One thing that may help, though, is that the parents of the younger children will be reading the book with them at home and then also sitting in with us during the class time. I'm hoping that for whatever I choose, I can break up the monotony of reading aloud with sound effects, something to see or touch, a related page to color (if they choose) as they listen, music, etc. Maybe that can help the younger ones stay more engaged with the story?

Since I was already thinking of ideas for Little House in the Big Woods, here is an example of what I might plan to do for the chapter "Two Big Bears." (For those who don't know, in this chapter, Pa goes to trade his furs, leaving Ma and the girls alone. While he's gone, Ma and Laura go out to milk the cow but there is a bear at the gate. Not realizing it is a bear and not their cow, Ma smacks it, then discovers the truth and she and Laura hurry to the house. When Pa returns home they recount the exciting incident and enjoy the treats he brought home from trading. He then tells them about how he also encountered a "bear" while walking home, which turned out not to be a bear at all but just a dead tree stump and his over-vivid imagination.)

I could have a tin-punch lantern (like Laura used in the story) to cast lights in a dim room as I re-tell the story of "Ma and the bear," then a bear pelt for them to feel so they can experience how it was different from the cow she expected. I have access to silicone bear paws made from real tracks, and the kids can use these to make prints in moon sand or on paper when we are finished with that part of the chapter (right after it mentions the tracks in the snow). Since Pa brought candy back from the store at the end of that story, I could have some old-fashioned candy for them to enjoy as we read the next part of that chapter about Pa's encounter with the imaginary bear as he traveled home. We could have a discussion about how our imaginations can make us "see" things, and we could do something like an ink blot activity and imagine what shapes we see. Stuff like that. It seems engaging enough (on paper at least) for younger children...

Of course it all sounds really easy on paper, and things can change when it is a room full of actual children! ;)
I love thinking of fun things to enhance a good story, especially if it's in my element (old timey and with animals).

Thankfully, due to a good relationship with our local wildlife refuge office, I do have an unusual amount of access to lots of "weird" things that could go along with a story like this... you know, weird stuff like bear pelts and tracks.

I am really seriously considering Little House in the Big Woods now! But I do appreciate all input and ideas to make something like this work smoothly!
I'm Shawna...
... a forgiven child of God since 1994 (age 16)
... happily wed to William since 1996
... mother of our long-awaited Gail (3/15/2006)
... missing 6 little ones (4 miscarriages, 2 ectopics)
... starting Rome to the Reformation this fall!

gratefulmom
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Re: OT: need book suggestion for co-op book club/activities

Unread post by gratefulmom » Fri Aug 29, 2014 2:58 pm

My sons have loved the "Little House" books.

Yodergoat
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OT: update on co-op book study

Unread post by Yodergoat » Wed Dec 31, 2014 12:34 am

Back in the fall, I asked for advice on what book to use for a twice-monthly co-op class book study. I did end up going with Little House in the Big Woods, and I wanted to give an update on how it is progressing.

I am quite possibly having more fun with this class than ANY I have ever taught in our homeschool co-op, and I have taught some varied classes (art with preschoolers, sketching, pyrography, TN wildlife, Flying Creatures of the Fifth Day, fun science for pre-K, and more). This book is just rife with possibilities for a class. I share some of these ideas here because I know many homeschoolers enjoy the Little House books, and it may inspire some of you to do some of these activities at home. This will be vastly more interesting to read if you're familiar with the book.

My class is 90 minutes long and consists of about 12 children (if all attend) varying in age from 4 years to about 11 years. Most of the parents stay with the children, and I have been blessed with many willing adult hands. This is the FIRST time that has ever happened while I am teaching in co-op, and I am loving it! I can concentrate on teaching instead of worrying about cleaning up or crowd control. :) I'm also thankful to have a large basement room with ample seating, easy access to the outdoors (all the better for roasting pig tails and shooting black powder rifles), and a large screen television which I can hook to my computer for showing videos and photos. It is the most ideal teaching situation I've ever had, which probably adds to my enjoyment.

We are slowly through the book, with the children reading at home. During class time we discuss what happened and have been doing any and all possible related activities that I can fit in. After an introductory week when we learned about the characters and setting, we began session 2 by talking about wolves (it is my comfort zone to talk about animals), split rail fences and food preservation. Sounds pretty dull, but we enjoyed eating fresh-cooked venison (some had never tasted it), smelling a hickory smoke fire, tasting homemade deer jerky, and learning about salt and its food preservation qualities by seeing what it does to apple slices. The children also constructed a miniature "snake rail" type fence outdoors with small wood slats. We watched a video segment about wolves in a creationist video called "The Master Designer: the Song" and discussed which species of wolves they had in Wisconsin and what species once lived in Tennessee.

For session 3, I decided to begin adding a biblical element to each lesson and focusing on a biblical trait which related to that portion of the story... in this case, it was "contentment." In this part of the story, Laura and Mary describe playing in the attic with a rag doll and a corncob doll, and Laura is content with her simple corncob doll. I brought a rag doll and a corncob wrapped in a handkerchief and let the children look at them, asking, "Would you be content with the corncob, and call it 'a good doll' like Laura did?" I think this really drove home the reality of the girls' simple toys.

This portion of the book also describe the fun to be had during a hog butchering... playing with the pig's bladder and eating a roasted pig tail. I went all out and bought a real pig's bladder from a local slaughterhouse so we could see if it really would inflate like a balloon as the Ingalls do in the story. This was probably the high point of my teaching career. ;) Guess what? It works! Our bladder balloon was small, but I attribute that to the fact that most pigs are slaughtered at a younger age these days than the would have in the Ingalls' time. I used a soda straw inserted into the urethra. The other open end of the bladder I had already pinched off with a rubber band. The children watched in morbid fascination as I blew it up. Ta da! We talked some more about contentment at this point. Would they be happy with this? Laura and Mary were!
IMG_1364.JPG
The inflated pig bladder.
IMG_1364.JPG (123.45 KiB) Viewed 9486 times
How much does a pig bladder cost, you may wonder. Around "these here parts," it was $5. But I had to promise the proprietors of the slaughterhouse that it was for teaching purposes only and that I would not eat it. :~ One difference I noted was that Garth Williams' illustration in the book is much less... veiny and gross than the real thing.

The same day we blew up the pig bladder, we went into the side yard of the church to roast pig tails on a stick. I had built some little hickory fires out there in metal tubs and had lots of adult supervision. Each child got a stick, a tail, and a sprinkle of salt. My husband, a meat department manager, regularly orders pig tails for some of his customers. Most of the children admitted that they were fun to roast and very tasty, although there was scant little meat on those bones. Laura and Mary only got one pig tail (to share!) in a whole year. No wonder they had a hard time being nice and taking turns.

Before class that morning, I had skinned the pig tails and rendered the lard from the skins, saving back the cracklings for the kids to taste. The book had said, "Cracklings were very good, but Ma said they were too rich for little girls to have more than a taste." Most of the children enjoyed the cracklings. It was a fine day for eating pig in various ways. ;)

We also did a salt brine experiment to see how salty the water must be to float an egg, while discussing brining hams.

The next class was another good one for eating. We discussed "working" as our biblical theme. We talked about chores, comparing the Ingalls' week of chores (wash on Monday, iron on Tuesday, mend on Wednesday, churn on Thursday, clean on Friday, bake on Saturday, rest on Sunday) with the children's own chores at home. I had them fill out a graph choosing which day they'd like best in the Ingalls' house. Saturday won, with Thrusday coming in second. We made butter, coloring it with grated carrot in milk like Caroline did during the winter months to keep the butter from being too pale. To be authentic, I grated the carrot on an old pan poked with nail holes, just like Caroline. I let them each have a spoon of the grated milky carrot, which had been a great treat for the girls in the book. We gave a jar of colored cream to each pair of children, turned on some of Pa's fiddle music and let them shake shake shake. Then we ate our pretty butter on bread. I've never seen such joy from simple bread and butter. Some children also enjoyed drinking the buttermilk. That was a fun day.

For our next class, we discussed Pa's music and how it brought Laura "comfort." I was blessed to be able to arrange for a very talented 16 year old homeschooled fiddler to come play for us. She competes in old time fiddling at an adult level, having placed well in many competitions. She not only came to tell us about fiddles and demonstrate her music, but she also played most of the fiddle songs mentioned in the first half of the book! And she did it on an old fiddle of similar make and year as Pa's! She played Yankee Doodle, Money Musk, The Yellow (Red) Heifer, Devil's Dream, Pop Goes the Weasel, and several more. Before each selection, I would read the excerpt which mentioned the song from the book and we would discuss any history related to it. We explored the parts of the fiddle and let the children see hers up close. This was an amazing class and an experience I will never want to forget! She is so good that it gave me chill bumps... it must have been much like hearing Charles Ingalls himself. The fiddler was so intrigued by the music from the books that she plans to continue learning all of the songs mentioned, and she is coming back later in the year to play for us again when we study "The Dance at Grandpa's." It makes me smile to think that some day she may compete in the old time fiddling competitions with a selection inspired by Little House in the Big Woods!

Our next class also featured a guest. We were studying "The Long Rifle," which tells all about how Pa cares for his gun. Our focus was on "obedience." My invited guest was a gunsmith who attends my church, and he brought along a black powder rifle which he explained and demonstrated. I got to fire it twice (just shooting wads) and the children were able to see, hear and smell all the distinctive qualities of this sort of firearm. After that demonstration, we discussed "black panthers" and what they might be... as scientists say there is no known native "black panther" in the northern United States. I have my own theories about that, but won't bore you with them here. ;)

That's as far as we've gotten. It has been enormous fun for me, and I hope the children and parents are enjoying it also. Our next meeting is not until February, when we will finally get to discuss Christmas. I think we'll make maple candy and some pancake men.

One funny note here. A little girl in my class had read ahead and saw that the next chapter we were going to study told about Pa klling a bear. She asked her mother, "Do you think Mrs. Shawna will have some bear meat for us?" to which her mother replied that I probably would not. "I think she might," the girl said. Then her little sister, who is too young for my class at 3 years old, asked very seriously, "If you do get bear meat, save me a piece please."

It really brings me joy and pleasure to be known as a person who "might have bear meat." I did actually try, with no success. Maybe some other time.


*** edited to remove the word "little" from the second sentence, which had preceded the word "update"***
I'm Shawna...
... a forgiven child of God since 1994 (age 16)
... happily wed to William since 1996
... mother of our long-awaited Gail (3/15/2006)
... missing 6 little ones (4 miscarriages, 2 ectopics)
... starting Rome to the Reformation this fall!

Poohbee
Posts: 394
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Location: North Dakota

Re: OT: update on co-op book study

Unread post by Poohbee » Wed Dec 31, 2014 10:44 am

Oh my goodness! You do go all out, Shawna! I can see why your students (and their parents) would eagerly anticipate each new class with you. I thought the inflated pig bladder sounded fascinating, but the roasted pig tails sounded a bit gross. ;-) Good for you for bringing that book to life for the kids. I think it's great you're having so much fun with it!
Jen
happily married to Vince (19 yrs)
blessed by MFW since 2006
have used every year K-1850MOD
2018-2019: Adventures with 9yo boy

Julie in MN
Posts: 2927
Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 3:44 pm
Location: Minnesota

Re: OT: update on co-op book study

Unread post by Julie in MN » Wed Dec 31, 2014 3:02 pm

I adore the lessons you are teaching. The one on contentment is beautiful. There is something in there about the joy of learning and exploring as well, I think. Thank you for sharing and inspiring!
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

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