Composer Study - Reviews of CTG music

Including using "English From The Roots Up," "God & the History of Art," & Composer Studies
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Julie in MN
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Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 3:44 pm
Location: Minnesota

Composer Study - Reviews of CTG music

Unread post by Julie in MN »

CharleneHoell wrote:Thirdly, do you find the music in CtG worth the time and effort since it is scheduled into the weekly plan?
We very much enjoy the music because -
- it livens up our day
- it's an "easy" subject
- there's just enough information in the biography CD and the teacher manual, and not too much
- in CTG, we did some fun art alongside Vivaldi's "4 Seasons" (dd framed one of hers)
- in EX1850, you review the composers again during the historical period they actually lived, so you get some more mileage / review
- in Minnesota, there is a wonderful school program through the Minnesota Orchestra, so we've been able to see many of the pieces performed
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002+)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs
Julie in MN
Posts: 2910
Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 3:44 pm
Location: Minnesota

Classical music approach

Unread post by Julie in MN »

sarah05 wrote:Hello, I was wondering if anyone could explain to me if there is any rhyme and reason to the sequence and choices made for what classical composers are studied in the 4 year cycle?

We are getting ready to do C to G so we did the Intro the Orchestra/ Peter and the Wolf and Tchaikovsky. I am trying to decide whether to buy the classical collection they recommend for C to G or find something different that goes in some type of order. I am ignorant about classical music and I just think it would make a lot of sense to me if it went in chronological order or related in some way to the other materials. I mean of course I understand there's no such thing as ancient classical music, but I didn't know if they chose the composers they did in each year for a certain reason and if we will place the composers in any type of order at some point.
Hi Sarah,
Your question made me curious (and I felt possibly responsible, since I mentioned in a recent post that the composers weren't related to ancient history in CTG), so I dug out my CTG manual and got out my EX1850 guide as well, to see what's what.

CTG starts with Vivaldi, Bach, and Handel because those are the earliest of the famous composers studied in MFW. After that, each year moves forward in time. So, yes, the composers and their music are studied chronologically, which helps students see the development of music. I think the idea is that by limiting the study to three composers per year, there is time for kids to become comfortable and familiar with each composer's style. I know that over the years, my son learned that he preferred some composers more than others - they were no longer all the same to him.

Notes in the CTG manual do briefly introduce the Baroque period in art, architecture, and music. Sometimes there are notes about specific pieces or things to listen for.

And then there is a review in EX1850, during the time frame when the music was actually written...

In week 7 of EX1850, when studying the 1600s, Marie tells students they are going to stop their study of the current composer and look at the big picture. She explains the MFW music that students have studied over the past several years has covered four periods of music. She has students place paper strips on their timeline for those 4 periods. Then she says that since they are now studying history in the 1600s, they will put the Baroque composers on the Baroque paper strip for 1600-1750 (Vivaldi, Handel, Bach - the CTG composers). She suggests a few Vivaldi pieces that students might re-listen to that week (and Bach in week 8 and Handel in week 15).

We really got into the review during eX1850 and I posted some of the things we did on the Ideas board. For instance: http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php ... 200#p34200

Does that help?
Julie
sarah05 wrote:Ok that helps! Thank you
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002+)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs
allipollitt
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Joined: Wed Jun 08, 2016 11:22 pm

MFW Music: Maybe More Historically Connected?

Unread post by allipollitt »

First let me say, I LOVE MFW and the music CDs. I do! I love all of MFW - BIG advocate. But let me put this out there: could we work together to have more musical selections from the Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic and Modern historical periods line up with the history in each curriculum? It was just strange to miss out on those opportunities during Creation to Greek through to where we are now, Expl. to 1850 (which does spiral back to some applicable composers, like Handel, for example.) Even during the Exploring Countries and Cultures, there is opportunity to study folk music from the geographical locations, also American folk music during Adventures in U.S. History. I would love to hear thoughts. It hits me close to home because I am a trained and certified (certifiable, maybe - wink, wink) Music Educator.

God Bless,
Allison
Consider it all joy!
manyblessings
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Re: MFW Music: Maybe More Historically Connected?

Unread post by manyblessings »

Love your perspective on this! I studied toward a BMus in vocal performance (unfortunately never quite finished), and it's nice to study music history alongside the rest of history, because music is such a big part of all history! All the arts, in fact :)
Lourdes
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Julie in MN
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Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 3:44 pm
Location: Minnesota

Re: MFW Music: Maybe More Historically Connected?

Unread post by Julie in MN »

Hi Allison (and Lourdes),
I'm thinking you musical folks can create a nice list for those musically inclined families out there! Meanwhile, I'll chat, even though I know very little about studying music. We did do all the MFW music, which my son liked a lot. I think it was because he was schooling alone, and it got very quiet here. We did lots of music in between our studies.

As you mentioned, starting in EX1850 you will review all the classical composers during the times that they lived. The classical musicians studied during earlier years were introduced pretty much in chronological order. We did more with them during the reviews in EX1850, for example (again, way down at the end of my long post): http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php ... 806#p41806

And then in 1850MOD, you will find more of what you describe -- Foster & Sousa (Oh Susanna and such), Jazz, and even patriotic-type songs. You could plan to delve into all of those even further -- and share with the rest of us!

As for earlier years, in ECC there were the folk songs on the Wee Sing CD. Did you do those? Do you have more ideas to add? One similar CD we had got after listening to the one from the library was called World Music -- I see I described it here http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php ... sic#p60239
We listened to another CD with Spanish Guitar, mentioned way down near the end of this post: http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php ... 909#p58909

In CTG, it might be hard to find ancient music (or to ensure we know what we're listening to!), although maybe you studied that? There are a couple of book basket CD suggestions that "relate" to ancient topics (rather than being ancient music), like an opera on the 10 plagues and something on creation. We did listen to a little Jewish music at our house, which seems historical: http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php ... 263#p35263

In RTR, there are some actual period CDs mentioned in regard to medieval chant, but if you have more ideas that would be great! There are also more that "relate" to the period, such as William Tell, the planets, and Russia/Peter & the Wolf.

Well just throwing out some things we did for fun!
Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002+)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs
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