Books - Don't judge a book by its cover....

Including using "English From The Roots Up," "God & the History of Art," & Composer Studies
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GoodCat
Posts: 40
Joined: Tue Oct 03, 2006 1:00 am

Books - Don't judge a book by its cover....

Unread post by GoodCat » Tue Apr 03, 2007 11:24 am

Don't judge a book by its cover.... Or something like that :)

I just wanted to encourage those who are looking at the books in 1st or CtG and thinking them a bit boring. I was a bit concerned, but having almost finished 1st, and loving it, I feel MFW is in tune with children and their needs and is complete.

I already ordered CtG for next year and have read over the TM. Seeing how and why MFW puts this curriculum together just made me sooooo excited. After seeing it I cant' wait until next year :)

Sometimes we need to trust that if we liked K, 1st, ADV, etc., that MFW did just as good of a job on the others too. Just a thought.

In Christ,

Cathy - wife to Sean for 12 wonderful years, and mother to 6 beautiful children (1yr-11yr)

cbollin

Unread post by cbollin » Tue Apr 03, 2007 12:35 pm

just gotta agree with you, Cathy :)

Each year in MFW has its own flavor and style. It's not going to be same every year with that same flavor. No matter what programs you end up using, don’t try to make it “just like last year.” Be ready to enjoy the year that is now. Each year in MFW is a special and lovely year in Our Father’s World.

just some ramblings from this side of the screen. :)

--crystal

tiffany
Posts: 160
Joined: Thu Mar 10, 2005 9:56 am

Unread post by tiffany » Tue Apr 03, 2007 12:43 pm

I totally agree. We've done ECC and most of CTG and it has not been boring at all.

We did have to miss a few project oriented things this year in CTG because of family circumstances, but there has certainly been enough to keep it interesting. The fall festivals were wonderful and a joy to celebrate as a family. There are also science projects and other activities mixed in to liven it up. My kids have really enjoyed the mythology portion as well. I never thought I would be looking forward to seeing what would happen in the next chapter of The Children's Homer.

ECC was such a joy and a refreshing change to us from what we had been doing. I really felt I was offering my children something special that went beyond intellectual learning.

My 5 year old loves MFWK and it is the perfect combination of learning and special time with Mommy, without being too overwhelming for me. I didn't even do Kindergarten with my 2nd and 3rd children. Once I saw the MFWK program, I decided it would be worth the effort. I have not been disappointed and I do plan to use it with my younger ones when they are old enough.
Tiffany
Wife to Tim ('88)
Mother to Sophie 16, Jonathan 14, Joey 12, Noah 10, Matthew 8, Eli 4
Have completed MFWK, MFW 1st grade, ECC, CTG, RTR, Exp.-1850,1850-Mod., HS Ancients, HS World
Fall of '11 ECC,HS Ancients, HS U.S. History to 1877

4Truth
Posts: 332
Joined: Fri Dec 17, 2004 11:59 am

CTG & living history books

Unread post by 4Truth » Sun Sep 23, 2012 6:46 pm

MOMS wrote:Are there any living history books that go along with CTG?
Do you have the teacher's manual yet? There's an extensive booklist in the back of the manual with approximately 300-400 titles that go along with the lessons. The list is divided up by week # or topic in several different subjects: history, science, Bible, art, and music.

There's also a separate list of classics unrelated to the lesson plans. This list is divided up by approximate grade level.
Donna, with two MFW graduates and the "baby" in 9th grade! %| Using MFW since 2004.

cbollin

Re: CTG & living history books

Unread post by cbollin » Sun Sep 23, 2012 7:57 pm

God's word is alive and is history too..... :)

**
Do you mean things like historical fiction titles other than those listed in book basket? (Not all of the 200-300 titles in book basket are just history... art and science included.)

There are some points in the "ancient history" study where there aren't a lot of historical fiction settings that are geared for elementary age. So it can get tough to find some of it.

I found that the "hands on books" in the package were helpful to keep it interesting. I liked the extra readings from internet links could be interesting. And some of the longer novels in CTG book basket worked better as read alouds with oldest when she did CTG the first time and then just as fun when she was middle school ages and doing CTG again... and on weeks where it wasn't as exciting in history, it was ok to have book basket filled with other fun things to read.

-crystal

Julie in MN
Posts: 2928
Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 3:44 pm
Location: Minnesota

Re: CTG & living history books

Unread post by Julie in MN » Sun Sep 23, 2012 8:08 pm

I'm never totally sure what a living book is, but some of the books in the CTG package might qualify (in addition to the Bible as already mentioned). Both the Childrens Homer and Aesops Fables come to mind as narrative stories. Maybe Archimedes and the Dinosaur book?

Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

MOMS
Posts: 12
Joined: Tue Aug 02, 2011 5:33 pm
Location: CA

Re: CTG & living history books

Unread post by MOMS » Sun Sep 23, 2012 10:59 pm

God's word is alive and is history too.....

:) LOVE IT! thanks for the answers girls~im just on one of those "not doing enough" trips right now
**Rachel** married to Hondo
2nd yr homeschooler
Bubba 10, Sato 7, Mia 4 & Baby Hondo 2

cbollin

Re: CTG & living history books

Unread post by cbollin » Mon Sep 24, 2012 6:24 am

MOMS wrote:i'm just on one of those "not doing enough" trips right now

It's always a good thing to check..... are we rushing through too fast? what do others do when it's just waaaaaaaaaay too quickly done with school.... am I forgetting something?
so...
if you'd like to brainstorm, or talk out loud if you're doing enough, or maybe not remembering something in the manual to do (you know... if school is done in 60 minutes and that's it.. and where's the rest...)
I might be the odd ball here, but CTG always felt lighter than other years to me mostly because Bible and history were often combined and overlapped, as well as just some weeks were lighter schedule, which meant more time on math and language arts, and electives for us.

*are they doing their dictations/copywork with Bible memory
*taking time on notebooking (we did a book to help with drawing for those)
*doing simple science lab write ups with the Genesis for Kids experiments. (it really is ok in elementary if science is only 2-3 times a week). Repeat the lab experiments with small changes in variable. let students do set up and clean up.
*nature walk? if i recall.. there wasn't a note in ctg grids to remember that (at least in my early first edition there isn't.. it's a reminder in the intro and then easily not remembered.)
*is student reading on own for 30 minutes a day from any book and getting some comprehension time (narration)
*book basket for 15 minutes on topics.
art program
music composers - you can make a notebooking page on those... from the Story of ________ CD.

If it gets hard to find book baskets on the list (and for me, CTG year was the hardest for that), or for those weeks where it's not a lot out there in public libraries for these topics for this age range....it's ok to read anything even if not on topics of history. or add in a fun elective to have productive educational time. They might learn how to type on keyboard or something. Some weeks it will be easier to find more books, or info on Egypt, or something. some weeks.. it's not as easy to find library stuff in ctg... it all works out over the year.


-crystal

4Truth
Posts: 332
Joined: Fri Dec 17, 2004 11:59 am

Re: CTG & living history books

Unread post by 4Truth » Mon Sep 24, 2012 4:28 pm

Julie in MN wrote:I'm never totally sure what a living book is, but some of the books in the CTG package might qualify (in addition to the Bible as already mentioned). Both the Childrens Homer and Aesops Fables come to mind as narrative stories. Maybe Archimedes and the Dinosaur book?

Julie
I would call the Patricia St. John read-alouds that are scheduled in CTG "living books", too. :)

Also, OP, check out the Answers in Genesis website. I bet you can find some great go-alongs there for this time period. (If you're looking to make some purchases vs. using the library for Book Basket, I mean.)
Donna, with two MFW graduates and the "baby" in 9th grade! %| Using MFW since 2004.

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