Special Needs - Teaching & resources for specific needs

Art, Foreign Language, Music, Nature Walks, as well as general ideas and encouragement
RachelT
Posts: 352
Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 2:45 pm

Re: learning disability help

Unread post by RachelT » Tue Mar 17, 2009 7:44 am

Hi Allison! We will not be in ECC until next year, but this is my 3rd year of homeschooling with MFW! My 8yr old son was recently diagnosed with dyslexia, dysgraphia, and ADHD (inattentive type). So he has some similarities to your son's diagnoses, but not I realize they are not completely the same.

The psychologist encouraged us to continue to do things orally so that he can continue to learn lots of information and not get bogged down in the processing of producing it on paper. I try to limit his writing to handwriting, some spelling or math or a little bit of English and Occupational Therapy. We do a lot of other things orally. I stopped worrying about the dictatation in PLL a long time ago because he just can't do it.

But, he can tell me what to write on a white board and where to capitalize or put punctuation marks. He can also narrate stories back to me and I can type them for him on the computer and print them out for him to read aloud. I do have him write in his math workbook, but when it starts slowing him down I will sit beside him and have him tell me what to write so that he is working out the math orally. I am also looking at some typing programs that we could use. An HSLDA special needs consultant also sent me some recommendations.

Rachel
Rachel, wife to Doug ~ 1995, mom to J (17) and B (15)
MFW K (twice), 1st (twice), Adv., ECC, & CtG 2006-2010,
Classical Conversations 2010-2016,
ECC/AHL 2016-17, eclectic 2017-18, WHL & US1 2018-19

http://rachelsreflections-rachelt.blogspot.com/

TriciaMR
Posts: 1001
Joined: Thu Sep 20, 2007 11:43 am

dyslexia

Unread post by TriciaMR » Wed Apr 15, 2009 9:30 am

Jenn in NC wrote:This week we found out that the academic difficulties our 2nd born has always experienced are actually dyslexia. I am feeling a little dazed right now. I have always known he was different than my other kids. But to have put a name on the problem, and have it be something that he may struggle with his whole life, has left me kind of sad. I guess all along I was really hoping we were just dealing with developmental delays, and that he would grow out of it. He is ten next month. He has to work so hard for every little advance he makes. And it is hard to watch him struggle so much, when things come so easily for the other kids. But dh says I should be happy about it because now we have a direction to go, something specific to research, and begin (hopefully) to make progress.

DS is near the end of 4th grade and tested beginning of 2nd for spelling. We use SP and I thought he was doing so much better! The low score really surprised me. He is at grade level for reading accuracy (his decoding is okay) but his speed is waaaay too slow for his age. He has trouble with auditory and verbal processing. And he has a lot of trouble with writing both in terms of handwriting and in terms of getting his thoughts on paper. He is about 40 lessons into ILL and struggling. Much harder for him than PLL, to the point that he no longer enjoys it. I have been doing all the tweaking I know how to do.

Anyway I am sure lots of you have dealt with this before. I don't really even know what questions to ask. I guess I just want advice/thoughts you all may have, your experiences, etc. Thanks for listening.
Jenn, first {HUGS}.

Second, definitely check out diannecraft dot org for help on auditory and verbal processing. Her Brain Integration Therapy book may help. My dd has writing issues - she has to think sooo hard on how to form letters (even cursive) that she can't remember how to spell. She used to have reading issues (word reversals, skipping lines, reading slow, sounding out lots of words, etc.) I've been doing the Brain Integration Therapy book this year and it has helped a lot. I can't say that I've seen much improvement on her writing issues, but that may also be a maturity issue as well (she is only 8 ).

AVKO (another site to check out) teaches reading by looking at patterns and teaching specific patterns (for example, not just oa, but oan, oak, oat). Kids who are "dyslexic" tend to need to be directly taught all the patterns. I see this with my dd. Once she knows the pattern, it sticks, but she has to be directly taught the new patterns - she doesn't see them. They believe that you don't stop teaching phonics/reading until 12th grade or even college. You kind of stop teaching phonics, but you continue by teaching patterns. For example, beau is really pronounced /bo/ -long o, but it's French, and it is something we've adopted into English, but none of the phonics programs I've looked at, except AVKOs will specifically teach that pattern, but you probably don't need to teach that one until high school level. I never studied French, so I didn't know that myself, until I was reading through AVKO's stuff. They also encourage teaching keyboarding (typing), as it engages both the left and right hemispheres of the brain, and can help with those patterns and processing issues.

Dyslexics can learn, they just learn differently and it may take longer. They need lots and lots and lots of praise - they already know how much harder everything is for them. I really try not to get on my dd about reading or spelling issues. I just want her to enjoy reading, and know that as time goes on, she will get better at spelling. I praise her a lot when she gets things right, and try to help her (do the erasing for her, spell it out loud for her, help her sound it out, etc) when she needs it. I even talk her through how to think about what she is reading.

Hope this helps.
-Trish
Trish - Wife to Phil, Mom to Toni(18), Charlie(14), and Trent(14)
2014-2015 - AHL, CTG
2015-2016 - WHL, RTR
2016-2017 - EXP1850, US1877
2017-2018 - DE, 1850MOD
2018-2019 - College, AHL
My blog

mgardenh
Posts: 174
Joined: Thu Oct 04, 2007 4:55 pm

Re: dyslexia

Unread post by mgardenh » Wed Apr 15, 2009 12:43 pm

Hugs to you. It is very sad and overwhelming when you find out that your child has a life long struggle. I have never been diagnosed with dyslexia but friends who have it tell me I am. That being said, I have a college degree. One friend has her PHD. Yes it isn't easy but you and your son can do it. Just to give you an idea my 7 year old dd reads faster than I do, spells better, and all of those things you said.

I know how sad and frustrating it can be because my dd has aspergers and will always be different may not even be able to live outside our home without significant help. So I understand feeling sad that your child will have to deal with this all their life. But things to think about: most brilliant people in the world past and present probably had some for of disability. They think Albert Einstein had aspergers. Also God created you child with purpose and being. He may have some reason for it. He may heal your son to show His Glory to his people or he may do some other things through your child that He needs your child to be the way he is to bring Glory to Himself.

Being a male I tend to agree with your husband. Now you know you have some things and tools available to you to help your son succeed. I know people have problems with labels but if you don't let the label define your child and rather use it to help you child bring glory to God then having the label can be good. With our dd with aspergers we now know why she does certain things and how to help her cope. If we didn't know that we would think we were the worst parents in the world. But understanding things about aspergers has helped us understand our dd and know how to help her. One day she might be an Albert Einstein (Not that he is an ideal but he was brilliant).

I want to encourage you to pray and seek God even talk to a counselor to help you work through issues if you need to. Sometimes just one or two sessions with a counselor or pastor or good friend can be really helpful.

Praying that God uses this to grow you and bring Glory to Himself.
Mike
DH to Laurel
SAHD (mostly) to
Julia - 10 years old, Explorations to 1850
Alexis-7 years old, Explorations to1850 see her story at
http://www.caringbridge.org/visit/alexisg
Have used MFW, k, 1st, Adventures, and ECC, CTG, RtR

Jenn in NC
Posts: 144
Joined: Fri Jun 23, 2006 2:00 pm

Re: dyslexia

Unread post by Jenn in NC » Wed Apr 15, 2009 2:04 pm

Mike, you said it is overwhelming, and I think that hits the nail on the head. That is exactly how I feel. I googled "dyslexia" right after we found out, and was blown away just by the sheer volume of info on the web. And no two people seem to have the same opinion; how am I going to sort through all of it? But you are right. I just need to pray through it. God has gotten us this far, and will continue to lead and guide us. DH says that just finding out it is dyslexia is itself an answer to prayer, because we have been so confused and concerned about this ds for the last several years, but had no idea what could be wrong.
TriciaMR wrote:Kids who are "dyslexic" tend to need to be directly taught all the patterns.
When I read this sentence, it was like the light went on in my head. That is exactly it. For my other kids, reading and spelling just seems to progress almost on it's own after the initial period of direct instruction when they are in K and 1st. But with Daniel, if I do not explicitly teach something, he doesn't seem to get it. He just never seems to "see" the patterns on his own.
TriciaMR wrote:I really try not to get on my dd about reading or spelling issues. I just want her to enjoy reading, and know that as time goes on, she will get better at spelling. I praise her a lot when she gets things right, and try to help her (do the erasing for her, spell it out loud for her, help her sound it out, etc) when she needs it. I even talk her through how to think about what she is reading.
Love this bit of advice. I really do just want him to enjoy reading. And to be proficient at it, to get to the place that it is not labor-intensive for him. And you are right, the advances he does make seem to happen only in a positive environment. When he feels that he is succeeding, it seems to breed more success. That is one of the things I love about home schooling. He doesn't have to be compared to his peers. He can just compare himself now with where he was a year ago. And there is always progress to be praised and celebrated! God is good. Trish thank you. You have taken the time to give me so much info and help and encouragement. I appreciate it. :) I am going to spend some time this afternoon or tonight looking at the websites you mentioned. Summer is coming. Lots of time to research! ;)

I am thinking I will try to find time to call the MFW office in the next day or so to talk to them specifically about whether I should continue with ILL for this particular son or go with another approach. If I find out anything, I will let you know!

Anyway, thank all of you so much for your wise words and your kindness and understanding. So many people have to face things that are so much harder than this. This is a difficulty but it is not devastating. So, chin up, Jenn. :) I will be thankful that ds is healthy and strong. That is a huge blessing. And I will be thankful that my husband believes so strongly in home educating. Because of that, my son is able to be here at home with me. I will be thankful that the God who created my son will be faithful to show us how to help him.

I am indebted to you guys for helping me see this from the right perspective. Thank you!
mommy to four boys & two girls... and another boy on the way :)
completed K, 1st, ADV, ECC, CTG and RTR
2009--2010 Enjoying Exploration to 1850

TracyLee01026
Posts: 23
Joined: Fri Jun 02, 2006 9:22 pm

Re: dyslexia

Unread post by TracyLee01026 » Wed Apr 15, 2009 8:03 pm

Jenn,
I totally can empathize with you. My 14yo has dyslexia and language-based LD, my 12 yo son has Aspergers and Tourette Syndromes, and language-based LD, and my youngest, 10, definitely has issues with reading and writing, probably dyslexia and/or language-based LD. It is so totally overwhelming, sometimes it is hard to put one foot in front of the other, but God is good and he has blessed our children with gifts and talents that will bring glory to Him.

I use Sequential Spelling with my older two, and will probably start using it with the youngest as well. I did the LiPS program will all three, I think that really helped as they all have auditory processing issues as well. I have used the Barton Reading and Spelling program Level 1 with my oldest, and I am thinking I will use it with the other two over the summer and possibly get level 2 as well. I use MathUSee with the oldest and youngest, my son uses Mastering Mathematics.

My kids have had every therapy imaginable, as I will take any help I can get! Sometimes I feel like I can't do it anymore, but I know no one else will go to the lengths that I will to get it done. It is easy to look up when we are already on our knees!
You and your family will now be able to make decisions regarding your son and take appropriate action. It is a good thing to have finally have a diagnosis. I remember how relieved and stressed I was at the same time, and will be again as I see these things in my youngest. At least it won't be such a shock.

I will be praying for you. Remember Jesus said, "In this world you will have trouble. But take heart! I have overcome the world." John 16:33.

God Bless you and your family,
Tracy

RachelT
Posts: 352
Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 2:45 pm

Re: dyslexia

Unread post by RachelT » Thu Apr 16, 2009 6:17 pm

Hi Jenn! Welcome to the dyslexia club! ;) Seriously, my heart goes out to you because I was in a similar situation 2 months ago. So, we can journey together if you would like!

Anyway, my ds is 8 and was diagnosed with dyslexia, dysgraphia, and ADHD, the inattentive type. We got a very thorough evaluation and report with lots of recommendations and I was feeling good about finally knowing, but it did hit me hard for a few days, making me feel overwhelmed and wanting to "fix" it. I just felt so sad that this is all going to be hard for him for his whole life and overwhelmed as his mother and teacher. I also found that there wasn't any reading specialist that works with dyslexic students around here to talk to, not even in our public school system. After talking with several different public school teachers, our speech therapist, and a principle, they couldn't help me, but most of them told me that by homeschooling Joseph, he is getting way more individual reading instruction here than he could possibly get in a public school. So, feel good that you are working with your children at home where you can individualize their curriculum and fit it to their needs. Like the psychologist told me about my son, your son is probably already farther ahead than he would have been in another type of school setting.

For my son, he went all the way through MFW K and 1st. This year for 2nd grade in Adventures, we had to stop SbSS (recommended spelling program) altogether and I was finding my own phonics instruction materials. Now, since his diagnosis and more research into the matter, we are using a reading and spelling system designed specifically for dyslexic students and I think it's working well. We are only about 3 weeks into it. One thing I like about this is that I can "train myself" with the dvd's to become his tutor. I don't have to go to a certification training class this summer or anything like that.

I also had been looking at the HSLDA website with the section for helping the struggling learner and the Dianne Craft information that is there. Then, she was a featured speaker at our homeschool convention this month! She has a lot of cool ideas and I'm trying some of those, too. Many of the things that she has talked about fit my son to a T, but I didn't see how it was all related.

I feel like I am still trying to figure this out, but I have begun implementing different things that we had not tried before and I am continuing to research some of the ideas I have heard of or read about. Hugs! God gave you this child because He knew you would be a great mother and teacher for him! You can do it!!!!

:-) Rachel

[editor's note: The story continues below http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php ... 316#p73543 ]
Rachel, wife to Doug ~ 1995, mom to J (17) and B (15)
MFW K (twice), 1st (twice), Adv., ECC, & CtG 2006-2010,
Classical Conversations 2010-2016,
ECC/AHL 2016-17, eclectic 2017-18, WHL & US1 2018-19

http://rachelsreflections-rachelt.blogspot.com/

Jenn in NC
Posts: 144
Joined: Fri Jun 23, 2006 2:00 pm

Re: dyslexia

Unread post by Jenn in NC » Fri Apr 17, 2009 6:56 am

TracyLee01026 wrote:It is easy to look up when we are already on our knees!
Oh Tracy I just love this reminder!
My goodness, you are dealing with so much! No wonder it seems so overwhelming for you sometimes. And I am feeling overwhelmed with just one with dyslexia. You are an inspiration!

We did switch Daniel from Singapore to Math-U-See just this last semester. We already owned all the levels of MUS, so it was a low cost solution and he had just hit a wall in Singapore. I really love Singapore and want to continue with it soon, but needed a change of "scenery" for him for a while. MUS is just very straight-forward and simple in it's approach. And with other things being so hard for him right now, he needed that.


Good morning Rachel!
The more I read about dyslexia/dysgraphia (he is dealing with both) the more I realize there were signs earlier on that I just didn't know to be watching out for, like a seeming inability to remember how to spell his last name or tie his shoes, and several other things. We were told early on that he had auditory processing issues, but I didn't know there was a connection to dyslexia.

I am sort of looking into other lang arts programs, simply b/c Daniel seems to have hit a total wall with ILL. But I am really not wanting to stop using ILL for a couple reasons. When we were first told about the auditory processing issues a few years ago, we had been using BJU. The psychologist who evaluated him suggested a move to something very CM for lang arts, and since MFW recommends PLL, we went with that. I did lots of tweaking it to his ability level, and it worked. He began to improve, felt successful, and did not hate English. Yea! We went through it slowly and did not finish until the middle of his 4th grade year (this year). Then moved into ILL expecting the same sort of response. But it has been very (very!) hard for him. The psychologist really believes that Daniel needs to be kept at a level where he can succeed.

Also I am feeling a little uncertain of my own ability to figure out what to do b/c we have been using SP and I thought he was doing well with it -- but on his eval the other day he scored almost 3 grade levels behind. So I guess I am looking at having to change spelling too.

Another issue too is that most of the reading programs I have seen for dyslexics assume that the child is either not reading at all or is barely reading. That is not true in Daniel's case -- he is reading almost at grade as long as you don't time him. IOW, he can decode, just very very slowly and laboriously. So... a learn-to-read program would be somewhat demoralizing to him. I mean, his 4 year old sister is learning to read! We need something based on O/G, but that will focus on fluency and automaticity for the older child. At least, that is what I *think* we need. ;)

Anyway thanks for your post. Yes, I would love to journey together! Good to have companions. :) Hope you enjoy your visit with your in-laws.
mommy to four boys & two girls... and another boy on the way :)
completed K, 1st, ADV, ECC, CTG and RTR
2009--2010 Enjoying Exploration to 1850

faithmom
Posts: 10
Joined: Sun Mar 23, 2008 1:24 pm

Re: dyslexia

Unread post by faithmom » Sun Apr 19, 2009 5:31 pm

I don't really have the energy to go in to everything, but I just want to say how excited I was to see Dianne Craft at my convention last month. Suddenly everything made sense to me about my oldest. I'm not particularly emotional, but I was almost in tears listening to her. I know it was an answer to prayer. Her ideas are very easy to implement. She has some (for lack of a better word) "therapy" to implement at home as well as suggestions for ways to study various subjects. I have been thrilled to see that there is a proven direction I can follow. :)
Irene
Married 20 years
ds-13, dd-11, dd-9, ds-7, dd-3, ds-1
Used ECC, CTG, K, 1st
2010-11 Using RTR and 1st

cbollin

Re: dyslexia

Unread post by cbollin » Sun Apr 19, 2009 6:35 pm

No experience with dyslexia. Just wanted to chime in with another name in homeschooling circles with ADHD and dyslexia - Dr. Stephen Guffanti. I don't remember hearing anyone saying his name on the thread, but I could have missed it too.

I know he was at Cincy convention as a speaker and at the Greater St. Louis Expo. Rhino Technologies recorded both of those conventions so you might check for some of his talks and workshops to see if anything he is saying may be helpful too.
Here's a link to the topics that he talks about even if his reading program isn't one that you're interested in or anything.
http://www.cincinnatihomeschoolconventi ... ations/#15

-crystal

microcarter
Posts: 14
Joined: Wed Feb 06, 2008 1:09 pm

dyslexia

Unread post by microcarter » Tue Apr 21, 2009 10:24 pm

Just saw the post by Jenn re: dyslexia. Incredibly this struck a chord because I have been discussing with my husband about the possibility that perhaps our son might have dyslexia. I know this is not related to MFW so if this isn't appropriate for this board could someone please email me some of the signs that gave them an indication that there might be a problem versus just typical early "mixups"?

I have already began a log of the things that he is doing every day that seem odd and cause some difficulty reading and writing. For instance today he spelled "me", "em" and he read "evil" as "live". He does other word reversals such as "was" for "saw", "on" for "no" and vice versa, and letter reversals like reading "from" as "form". Of course he does typical letter reversals "b" for "d" or writing a "q" instead of a "p". Once he even spelled his name "Knox" as "xonK" but the weird thing was the "n" and the "K" were also backwards, like a mirror image of his name. When I asked him what was wrong with it, he honestly didn't know until I pointed it out and then he felt a little sheepish.

That's when my mom reminded me that my grandpa was dyslexic. My ds is only 6 but I don't want to wait too long to get him checked out if these things aren't typical first grade issues. My dd was an early reader and didn't do any of these things except perhaps a few backwards letters or "b" for "d" substitutions. BUT my dd does have sensory processing disorder and we waited too many frustrating years before getting her help. I do NOT want to make that same mistake again, however, I also don't want make a big deal if it's nothing that a little maturity won't fix. I suppose I should mention that he does seem to be reading on grade level even though he is a pretty slow reader.

The other question I have is how do you find someone to test for dyslexia? I don't know if this is appropriate discussion for this board so if not please just email me. Thanks!
Angie

dh of 22 years Danny
dd Sage 11
ds Knox 7
ds Kase 4

Jenn in NC
Posts: 144
Joined: Fri Jun 23, 2006 2:00 pm

Re: dyslexia

Unread post by Jenn in NC » Wed Apr 22, 2009 6:19 am

Hi Angie,

The age thing is hard. Of my three kids who are solidly reading, one never showed any signs of dyslexia, one showed signs early on and has yet to mature past them (he will be ten in few weeks and is only now being diagnosed), and another who has shown some early signs but is rapidly outgrowing them (and our evaluator is entirely unconcerned about him, she says his reversals etc are just developmental and not to worry). I don't honestly know how she can tell the difference between early signs that are just immaturity and early signs that mean something more is going on. I guess that is why we pay her. ;) I think it *may* be an indication if the child is a visual learner. Not sure though.

Anyway, our evaluator is an educational psychologist, who is also a Woodcock-Johnson tester. We have to test every year in NC, so there are a lot of people doing that here. Not sure how people usually find someone to diagnose?

I am still so new to all this that I don't know how much help I will be to you -- but I want to mention the book Reading Pathways by Delores Hiskes. For the age you are dealing with, it looks like it may be helpful. Check out the reviews on amazon for this one (the first one deals with dyslexia).
mommy to four boys & two girls... and another boy on the way :)
completed K, 1st, ADV, ECC, CTG and RTR
2009--2010 Enjoying Exploration to 1850

TriciaMR
Posts: 1001
Joined: Thu Sep 20, 2007 11:43 am

Re: dyslexia

Unread post by TriciaMR » Wed Apr 22, 2009 9:15 am

Angie,

My dd did the on/no, was/saw, felt/left, from/form evil/live stuff while reading a lot. The only letters she really reversed while reading were b/d, but several she wrote backwards (and still occasionally slips up) including s, c, f (makes the arch the wrong way), and numbers 3, 5, 6, and 7, with an occasional 2 written backwards. We have been doing Dianne Craft's writing eights this year to work on those and she now only very occasionally gets her 3 backwards and f if she prints (she's been doing cursive since 1st grade, but still likes to try to print). If you catch it young, those writing-eights can really help.

My dh finally told us to stop the "Brain Integration" therapies last week and see how she does - he feels she is finally maturing more, and that may be part of why we are seeing an improvement. She no longer does the reading reversals (still skips words and says when for then and then for when, but I think she gets ahead of herself reading aloud - I do it too).

I know someone else who did a lot of hands on stuff to help with the reversals. Make 4 x 6 cards of the numbers and letters, and then have them use play-dough to make a long rope, and then place them over the cards to form the letters. Make big construction paper letters/numbers and put them up shoulder height of the kid, and help them trace how they should write the letters. Use masking tape and make the letters on the floor, and have them walk around them the way they should write them, or drive their cars over them. Things like that, that are really large muscle group stuff. Constantly working on moving left to right.

It's funny, one of my 4 year olds started "copying" letters/numbers a while back onto a magna doodle. He did lots of reversals at first. I didn't say anything, I just encouraged him to look closely. Well, the other day, he wrote all his numbers facing the correct way, by himself, without having any numbers to look at. For some kids, I think it does self-correct, but if you get to 7/8 and it's not, you can start doing some of the cheaper therapies (like Dianne Craft).

Just MHO.

-Trish
Trish - Wife to Phil, Mom to Toni(18), Charlie(14), and Trent(14)
2014-2015 - AHL, CTG
2015-2016 - WHL, RTR
2016-2017 - EXP1850, US1877
2017-2018 - DE, 1850MOD
2018-2019 - College, AHL
My blog

TriciaMR
Posts: 1001
Joined: Thu Sep 20, 2007 11:43 am

Re: dyslexia

Unread post by TriciaMR » Wed Apr 22, 2009 2:27 pm

Jenn in NC wrote:Tricia, How long have you been using the therapies? I am also curious how long you typically spent on them daily/weekly? Thanks again for all the info. :)
We've been doing them since the beginning of our school year, last August, pretty consistently. I was spreading the "therapies" or "exercises" through-out the day. It would go something like this:

Awana Memory Work
Cross-crawls
Bible
Ear-Eights
Geography
Jogger's Lunge
Science
Fencer
Spanish
Writing-Eights
English/Writing/Spelling
(lunch)
Cross-Legged toe touch
Math
Eye-eights
Reading

This way I didn't feel like it was taking up a bunch of our day. Writing-eights take the most time - she says to spend no more than 15 minutes a day on those. Just go as far as you can, and then pick up the next day where you left off through the alphabet. Eventually, you can get them done in 15 minutes. The rest probably take 10 minutes, total. A couple of weeks ago I changed things and started doing everything but writing-eights and eye-eights after memory work (those I saved for before writing and before reading). It only took about 10 minutes to do those, maybe 15 if she was being "goofy" and we had to deal with that issue.

I know one mom who does these, and she does everything but the writing-eights at the beginning of the school day, giving herself 15 to 20 minutes to work with her kid alone.

Then on light and independent Friday's we did "repatterning". That usually took 20 minutes. On repatterning days you don't do the other exercises.

Like I said, we've stopped for now, per dh's request.

-Trish
Trish - Wife to Phil, Mom to Toni(18), Charlie(14), and Trent(14)
2014-2015 - AHL, CTG
2015-2016 - WHL, RTR
2016-2017 - EXP1850, US1877
2017-2018 - DE, 1850MOD
2018-2019 - College, AHL
My blog

mamaofredheads
Posts: 61
Joined: Sat Oct 28, 2006 10:23 am

Re: dyslexia

Unread post by mamaofredheads » Thu Apr 23, 2009 7:47 am

FreshKid wrote: are dyslexics consistent in the letters that they reverse or words they jumble?
My 2 were consistent in letters they reversed (no more reversals after Level 2 of Barton!! - or if there is an infrequent reversal they catch themselves). However, the words they jumble are not consistent. It could be anything. I have noticed that sometimes it's a particular sound that they add to a word, for example my older would add the letter l to words when it wasn't there. Once I pointed that out and we worked on it for several days he would catch himself and self-correct. There is an excellent checklist on the Barton website to determine if your child might be dyslexic (there is much more to it than just reversing letters as some kids outgrow that). I'm pretty sure it will be in Jenn's links, but in case it isn't it's www dot dys-add dot com.

Glenna

TriciaMR
Posts: 1001
Joined: Thu Sep 20, 2007 11:43 am

Re: dyslexia

Unread post by TriciaMR » Thu Apr 23, 2009 9:03 am

FreshKid wrote: Trisha: Do you think the therapies you mentioned ... I know nothing about them... would be good activities even if dyslexia is not a problem?
There is a book called "Smart Moves: Why Learning is Not All in Your Head" (or something to that effect). It is very technical, but she recommends doing many of the "exercises" that Dianne Craft does (plus more). It's not just about dyslexia. It's about getting the brain working at maximum efficiency, I think. I know of school teachers who will just notice their class is just kind of "run down," so they'll do one of the "Brain Gym" exercises, or they're not focused and they'll do them. Or, right before a test, they'll have the kids do an exercise. (I think a web search on Brain Gym will lead you to some of this stuff).

They won't hurt. In the book, she talked about a kid who was in high school, and still couldn't read. His mom went to some talk, and she just started having him do cross crawls every day before school. (The only reason they passed him was because he was a great basketball player.) Anyway, I think the story goes that in about 3 months, he was reading.

The book doesn't recommend doing the repatterning like Dianne Craft does (the book thinks a "specialist" should do those, but Dianne Craft talks about why she thinks it's okay for anyone to do those).

Oh, the other thing is water is key. The brain needs lots of water.

-Trish
Trish - Wife to Phil, Mom to Toni(18), Charlie(14), and Trent(14)
2014-2015 - AHL, CTG
2015-2016 - WHL, RTR
2016-2017 - EXP1850, US1877
2017-2018 - DE, 1850MOD
2018-2019 - College, AHL
My blog

Jenn in NC
Posts: 144
Joined: Fri Jun 23, 2006 2:00 pm

Dyslexia / Story of the World, on CD

Unread post by Jenn in NC » Thu May 14, 2009 6:16 pm

We are doing RTR right now with the CD's and I love, love, love having them. My kids really love to listen to them. I think they are worth every penny. Timberdoodle dot com usually has a good price on them.

Like Julie, I sit with the remote in hand so we can pause and discuss, or re-listen to a particular point here and there. And you will definitely need the book too, but you'll get that with your RTR package anyway.

Remember talking about my dyslexic ds a few weeks ago? Lately I have taken to letting him read along in the book while the cd plays. I think it is making a difference for him! So excited. Thought I'd share. :)
mommy to four boys & two girls... and another boy on the way :)
completed K, 1st, ADV, ECC, CTG and RTR
2009--2010 Enjoying Exploration to 1850

Amy C.
Posts: 203
Joined: Thu Apr 30, 2009 9:12 am

Special Needs Articles

Unread post by Amy C. » Sun Jul 05, 2009 8:04 pm

I just received my latest edition of The Old Homeschoolhouse magazine (Summer 2009). There are many articles in there regarding special needs children and home education. I know that there have been many special needs posts lately, some looking for help/direction. There is an article in there about how to find help in diagnosing. I don't know that there is anything different in the article than what has been posted on here, but there might be some good ideas. There is an article in there from Heather Laurie who is the host for Special Words for Special Needs-On the Company Porch at the Homeschool Blogger web page. She says that she has found encouragement and help from other homeschoolers of special needs children on homeschoolbloggerdotcom.

I just wanted to pass this info along in case anyone is interested.
Amy C.

Jenn in NC
Posts: 144
Joined: Fri Jun 23, 2006 2:00 pm

dyslexia at what age?

Unread post by Jenn in NC » Mon Jul 06, 2009 7:49 am

Jessmomof2 wrote:Can anyone tell me what age you can really know that your child has dyslexia. I have heard that 5 year old's still write their letters backwards and not to worry. My ds will be 6 in Oct. and I feel that even after instruction he still writes some letters and numbers backwards.
I have a 7 year old ds who is still showing reversals etc, and our evaluator does not think he is dyslexic. This is the same evaluator who indicated that my 10 yo is indeed dyslexic. In the case of my 7 yo, she thinks it is just a developmental delay. Basically, he is just all boy, if you know what I mean. :)

Don't know if that helps or not though. Do you have anyone who could do a pre-eval on your ds? (A quick and painless assessment to help you see if you should investigate further?)
mommy to four boys & two girls... and another boy on the way :)
completed K, 1st, ADV, ECC, CTG and RTR
2009--2010 Enjoying Exploration to 1850

RachelT
Posts: 352
Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 2:45 pm

Re: dyslexia at what age?

Unread post by RachelT » Fri Jul 10, 2009 10:44 am

Jessica, Hi! MFW Kindergarten will be fun for your eager student! I would not be alarmed at this point about reversals. I am not a dyslexia expert, but since my ds (8 yr old) was diagnosed a few months ago and I also have a 6 yr old, I can tell you that they have learned very differently. My dd, the younger one, still reverses letters occasionally like b d p and certain numbers like 2 and 5, but she is zooming ahead in her reading ability and has probably already passed her brother in what she is able to read at the moment (sh...don't tell either one of them that, though!). So, there are certain letters and numbers that are just more confusing, but she is not dyslexic and her reading has come naturally. She has had instruction, but a couple of months ago she just started reading everything, even words that I knew we had not learned the phonics "rules" for. My ds still has not done that. He reads, but we are still going through rules in a reading program designed for his learning style.

At any rate, don't panic about reversals and just see how this year goes. My dyslexic ds actually did well with the K phonics and his difficulties began to show up more in 1st grade.

I hope you have a great K year!
Rachel :)
Rachel, wife to Doug ~ 1995, mom to J (17) and B (15)
MFW K (twice), 1st (twice), Adv., ECC, & CtG 2006-2010,
Classical Conversations 2010-2016,
ECC/AHL 2016-17, eclectic 2017-18, WHL & US1 2018-19

http://rachelsreflections-rachelt.blogspot.com/

cbollin

vision therapy?????

Unread post by cbollin » Tue Aug 25, 2009 10:55 am

dorenekimberly wrote:I have a daughter whose eyes hurt her when reading and writing. She wears glasses and has been seen by various ophthalmologists. They have no suggestions and have even told us that vision therapy is a scam. I however have read many good things about VT. However, I can find no vision therapists near where we live. I have been told her eyes don't track properly.

Thank you so much,
Dorene
one source to call on this:
HSLDA and ask for their special needs department. They might have a contact in your area.

Another resource out there:
headsupnow.com You might like a book she sells called Seeing Clearly: Fun Activities for Improving Visual Skills. It is published by Sensory Resources. But I like to buy from headsupnow when I can as they are a homeschooling family company and I know them. The activities don't require computer either. all kinds of easy to do at home games.

You'll want to get a qualified optometrist, instead of ophthalmologists, as vision therapy and related things are really done by optometrist. Different kind of profession. vision therapy does not have to be a scam at all. My goodness, even pediatric occupational therapists recommend it. So, I'd "look" somewhere else if you get told that.

one place to check if you haven't done so:
visiontherapy dot org might have more leads for you.

at least a start...

-crystal

Julie in MN
Posts: 2928
Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 3:44 pm
Location: Minnesota

Re: vision therapy?????

Unread post by Julie in MN » Tue Aug 25, 2009 12:50 pm

Just an unrelated note...

My son's eyes "hurt" when he does paperwork & such, but it's more of a "pain" than a "muscle soreness." Our ophthal. had a theory that it was some kind of minor allergy or "sensitivity" to some unknown thing -- who knows, maybe dust or ink or whatever. He had us try several eye drops. One of the drops did solve the problem.

Probably not your issue, bu when I heard your description, I thought of my son.
Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

JenniferF
Posts: 32
Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 5:19 pm

Re: vision therapy?????

Unread post by JenniferF » Tue Aug 25, 2009 4:25 pm

My oldest had vision therapy for about 10 months two years ago. Her eyesight itself is great however she had trouble with tracking (like when reading or doing copywork she would easily lose her place). We went once a week to the therapist and did exercises at home for a few minutes each day. It really did help her. I too felt uncertain at first because I had vision therapy for different reasons as a child and it didn't help me much....but that was a LONG time ago and the way they do therapy now is different.

I would recommend checking out these two websites. The first has lots of information and this part links to what you were describing- having a hard time reading and therapy success stories. The second link it the the Center we used. Perhaps you could call them, describing the problem and ask if they know of a therapist in your area. Oh, on the first link there is also a "Find Doctor" at the top- enter your name, city, state and email and they will send you names of those in your area.

http://www.visiontherapystories.org/hea ... ision.html

http://www.centerforvisionandlearning.com/index.html

I hope this helps. There is lots of information on these sites.

Jennifer
Jennifer

Cyndi (AZ)
Posts: 543
Joined: Mon Jun 18, 2007 4:22 pm

Re: vision therapy?????

Unread post by Cyndi (AZ) » Wed Aug 26, 2009 12:54 pm

Sorry - I don't have time to type out our whole story, but just wanted to confirm that vision therapy works! It is definitely not a scam. How silly. Praying you find a better doc. (My dd's eye doc is actually a physician that takes medical insurance, even though she deals strictly with eyes. Don't be afraid to think outside the box.)
2018/19: US1877
used MFW from K through WHL

cbollin

Need help with autistic son

Unread post by cbollin » Sat Jan 30, 2010 8:31 am

zeemama wrote:I started doing ECC and K with my 4 kids right before Christmas. I love it and it is working well for 3 of 4 of my kids. My 11 year old however is another story.

Here is where I need help. He can not read much. My supervising teacher and I agree that something needs to be done to change this, but we don't know what. He knows his letters and basic words. But when he gets to blends he gets very frustrated and that is where his defiance rears its ugly head. Currently we are using Explode the Code, he is on book 2. His younger sister (9 with no special needs) is on book 3. He knows this and is very frustrated with this. My supervising teacher is wanting me to put Caleb on a straight workbook program specifically to work on his behavior and simultaneously work on character issues. My heart says that this would be a mistake, but I do agree that I need to find more ways to work on his behavior and school work. Do you have any ideas? By the way, I do take him to a therapist, who currently is no help and I'm looking for a new one because of this.

God Bless You All,
Malissa
((hugs)) I can't stand autism meltdowns and frustrations. Talk about needing extra measures of grace under fire. Sometimes I just cry with her. I recently read where mommas like us carry the same stress levels as combat soldiers. amen! then we have to deal with therapists and all of that. here's another ((hug)). wish I had some great awesome answer or something.

My youngest (age 7), 1st grader now, is my PDD NOS kid. She did ok with MFW K for blending practice and having multisensory "workbooks". Workbooks don't have to be paper and pencil all the time. If we want, I can type out a lot of persuasive arguments to share with your supervising teacher how MFW K is character training in more than just and only workbook and really is good with special kids too. I have a lot of posts in the Kindy Ideas forum of what I did last year with my youngest. I'm guessing a lot of it could be adapted for an older autistic student as well. My little gal is more on the high functioning side of stuff.

We also played a lot with Starfall.com.
We did a lot of audio cd children's book
She loved putting on the subtitles on her DVD's.

To help with reading, and phonics etc... have you looked into anything like Time4Learning? It's an online subscription service. We started that recently and my autie likes it. She really loves playing with one section on it, so we did the standard ABA thing: first do math lesson, then you get to do It's Puzzling.

General stuff with Behavior and school work with kids on the spectrum:
one of my favorite resources is a homeschool company called HeadsUpNow.com She carries a lot of books and resources.
Are you doing Sensory Integration stuff at home prior to starting seat work? you know...like Out of Sync Child has Fun?
I seriously doubt most kids on the spectrum learn much character from seatwork. ;) But visual books -- that's another story. There's a real popular one right now.... it is written by Jed Baker and titled:
Social Skills Picture Book: Teaching Play. emotion and communication to children with autism.

it's really good -- breaks down the situation, uses photographs of kids in real situations. Shows the right way to handle and also show the "wrong way" with a big slash on it so they know that is not a good approach and why. The book does explain that if you think your child will not benefit from seeing the "wrong way" then you can skip it. it gives some good guidlelines of know thy student... so, yeah...

You can find the sample stuff on google books. The intro section is shown on there and talks about various methods (none of which are workbook) that are strategies for teaching these behavior skills.
here.... if the mods have to delete my link.. it's ok.. The intro section that is shown on the google books preview contains a wealth of information for dealing with it.
Jed Baker Social skills book
oh apparently he has a book for high school and beyond too. I've never seen that one in person.



and hopefully, Mike will see this thread and chime in. He's a homeschooling dad on this forum with an Aspie kid.

-crystal

mgardenh
Posts: 174
Joined: Thu Oct 04, 2007 4:55 pm

Re: Need help with autistic son

Unread post by mgardenh » Sat Jan 30, 2010 10:14 am

((Hugs)) to you. It can be very difficult to teach one on that is on the spectrum. As cbollin said I have a child who is an Asperger. High functioning. She also has other issues as well.

Here are some ideas. Hope something helps. Without knowing the specifics of your child some things will work and some won't. Pick what works for you.

I would start by trying to see if you can figure out why the meltdowns and what is triggering it. This could be any number of things from sitting to long or having to focus to long, to sensory issues or whatever. Also I don't know where your son is on the spectrum but some grace in his reading. You can't expect him to be on the same level as a neurotypical kid without having had some intensive therapy and training. Even then he will need things that other kids won't. It's ok that he may not be where his sister is. God has created him and has a plan for his life. Many people will be blessed by your son. If you figure out what the problem is you can help him deal with the issue.

Keep things really short. No more then 10 minutes without a break. Is there something he really likes to do (like being on the computer). Work for 10 minutes then let him have time doing his favorite thing. With reading give your son things of high interest to him while he reads. Either books about the topic or what I did is have my dd read to her dinosaurs (her most favorite thing in the whole world). Incorporate his favorite thing in with school. For a while I had to incorporate dinosaurs for every part of school to get through it. If you can find books on his reading level or just above on a topic he just loves then I bet you will see his reading improve. It's ok for you to read the School stuff to him.

Also use sensory things for your kid. Like having him sit on a exercise ball while you read to him or while he reads. Make sure that the clothes he wears don't bother him or a distraction. My dd can only stand to wear 100% cotton or it just bothers her. There is a brushing technique you can use (where you use a special brush on his skin). This helps to tolerate touch. Also be sure when you do school that he sits on something that is comfortable to him. It might be a hard floor or chair or something soft. Do a sensory activity before and after each 10 min of school. You are probably thinking. We will never get through school this way. If you start with very short times of school and then breaks before long you will find that you can add more length to the time you do school. Teaching a child on the spectrum is very teacher intensive. I know you have other children which makes it even for difficult. But while you son takes a break you can teach the other kids.

Make sure that the routine is the same. Kids on the spectrum don't usually like things mixed up. If you do math first or what ever make sure you keep the order the same. Try not to very it at least for your son.

My opinion is when it comes to school even though learning how to be flexible and deal with changing things and stuff is very import for a child on the spectrum I think that you should not use school to teach those things. You need to get through school. So do what you can to get through school. Doing school is so taxing on a child on the spectrum it takes everything they have to do school. If you though things off by changing stuff or putting stuff in a different order this can be such a distraction and so upsetting that you blow it for school.

About workbooks. Workbooks provide a structure that a lot of the kids on the spectrum really like. My dd loves when we do the Advanced geography in ECC (the workbook pages). There is something about order for them.

Another thing is ECC may be too advanced for him (not intellectually but with the work). If he is still learning to read you might need to do something like first grade with him.

I have to go now but if I think of more I'll chime in.
Mike
DH to Laurel
SAHD (mostly) to
Julia - 10 years old, Explorations to 1850
Alexis-7 years old, Explorations to1850 see her story at
http://www.caringbridge.org/visit/alexisg
Have used MFW, k, 1st, Adventures, and ECC, CTG, RtR

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