Schedule - How to fill state requirements

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mom2boys
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Re: MFW and MO 1000 hour requirement

Unread post by mom2boys » Sun Nov 21, 2010 7:45 am

We live in MO too. Have been homeschooling here for about 9 years. It is my understanding that we are required to have 1000 hours of which at least 600 must be core. But it is not necessary that the other 400 be non-core. So you could have 800 hours of core and 200 of non-core. They just want to make sure you are not counting 1000 hours of PE as a complete school year. Does that make sense? Is this how you read it Donna?
~Charlotte
loving my Hubby and 3 sons 16, 13, 7
Used MFW since 2004

cbollin

Re: MFW and MO 1000 hour requirement

Unread post by cbollin » Sun Nov 21, 2010 7:49 am

at least portfolios are easy in MFW with the projects and notebooking.

I don't know about "non core" in terms of teaching. But if we had ended up in STL instead of Memphis... things in our life that are "non core" would be:

any handicraft time (cross stitch, crafts, etc that are done as extra not scheduled in the manual)
sports
service projects
music
art
art history
anything home ec or home repair
driver's ed (or prep for driver's ed -- you know, when the oldest sits in the front passenger seat and tells you where to turn, and when to flip the signal....)
Electives: foreign language isn't considered core in MO, right?

I know in MO there's the debate on using chore time as non core. I'm not a legal expert. But I know in some countries it is school time when the students care for the school property.
mom2boys wrote: It is my understanding that we are required to have 1000 hours of which at least 600 must be core. But it is not necessary that the other 400 be non-core. So you could have 800 hours of core and 200 of non-core. They just want to make sure you are not counting 1000 hours of PE as a complete school year. Does that make sense?
not donna, but felt like chatting....
yepper. it says "at least" 600 in core. but it doesn't say that 400 must be in noncore. It can be 900 and 100. there's no minimum on non core. (just like the set structure rules in my group exercise class.... no minimum minutes on stretch routines. LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL

of course, I'm still confused on the 400 of the at least 600 must be in the regular school location? huh?

-crystal

MelissaM
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Re: MFW and MO 1000 hour requirement

Unread post by MelissaM » Sun Nov 21, 2010 1:45 pm

cbollin wrote:of course, I'm still confused on the 400 of the at least 600 must be in the regular school location? huh?
Just a guess - but this probably means the teaching parent must do at least 400 of the 600 hours - you can't outsource more than 1/3 of the 600 hours or it won't technically count as homeschooling the way the law is written? It's probably less about location than who is doing the teaching - I think we have something similar in NC, but I can't remember the exact wording at the moment.

:)
Melissa
:)
Melissa
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4Truth
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Re: MFW and MO 1000 hour requirement

Unread post by 4Truth » Sun Nov 21, 2010 8:17 pm

Howdy! Sorry, long day out with our church family today....

Yes, we need *at least* 600 of the 1000 hours to be in the 5 core subjects: History, Science, Math, Reading, and LA. (And there's no breakdown of how those hours should be divied up between those 5 core subjects.... but I think HSLDA would probably recommend making sure it's balanced, so not too "history heavy" with no science. I don't think it would be good to take an exercise class where you only work the arms but seldom or never work the legs, ya know?) Virtually anything else you do that's educational beyond those 5 core subjects.... field trips, music lessons, swimming, art, photography, the Nutcracker Ballet in December, sewing/cooking/home ec, Driver's Ed, learning how to refinish wood furniture, Homeschool P.E. class at the "Y", Crystal's exercise class.... those kinds of things would all be Non-Core. Use discernment. Chore training an 8yo for a *season*? Sure, I'd count that (for a specific period of time). Making their beds every morning for 18 years? Ummm, no. ;)

And yes, the 400 hours "at your regular school location" is to insure that you're getting a good chunk of what's supposed to be HOME-schooling AT HOME (or with your parents/primary teacher). (I say "primary teacher" because there is some language in the law that allows someone other than mom or dad to be the primary "homeschool teacher", i.e., a grandparent or Aunt Susie... but there are rules surrounding that circumstance, too.)

IOW, you can't sign your kids up for enrichment classes/public/private school classes for most subjects and call it HOME-schooling, when you're not actually HOME-schooling, kwim? I don't think it's considered HOME-schooling if your kid is signed up with K-12 virtual school through the public school system, either. So that sort of thing. Doesn't mean your kid can't ever take an outside class.

Oh, and never, ever, EVER believe the public school if they tell you what THEY think you're supposed to do as a homeschooler. Always call HSLDA *first* if you ever get a letter or phone call from the public school telling you XYZ. I know you're not having that problem, but I'm just mentioning it while we're on the subject because some public schools in MO have been doing a lot of that recently.

And again, I'm not a lawyer and therefore am NOT interpreting the law and I still think it would be best to contact HSLDA or FHE for a more official explanation just to cover yourself and be certain. I'm just a mom who's been in MO for 9 years this month (wow! where does the time go? :~ ), and this is my *understanding* and how we've always done it.
Donna, with two MFW graduates and the "baby" in 11th grade! %| Using MFW since 2004.

4Truth
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Re: MFW and MO 1000 hour requirement

Unread post by 4Truth » Sun Nov 21, 2010 10:16 pm

300sms wrote:TY, So I now feel so much less anxious. I still want to work in more non core but I think the fact that we may not hit 400 by years end is ok.

I guess my next ? is how to count those pesky high school credit hours. I was thinking 100 hours spent is 1 credit am I close?
No, it's 120-150 hours for 1 credit (depending on the subject), and more like 180 hours if you're doing a subject w/labs (like Biology). And a half credit would be at least 60 hours, but less than 120.

There is a new MO *statute* (which is different from a LAW) that has some variation on that if your child accumulates so many hours of High School *statutory* credits before the age of 16, then you don't have to count hours anymore. But you'd definitely have to call HSLDA on that one, because it's complicated. And if your son isn't going to make that # of hours before the age of 16, it doesn't apply to you, anyway. ;)

Read this: http://hslda.org/highschool/docs/EvaluatingCredits.asp
300sms wrote:So then how does that play out with the 1000 hour thing. Goodness I thought since college is basically 1 hour = 1 credit that hs is the same. I mean it is college after all. A lab science in college is 4 credits which is 3 hours a week lecture and 1 hour a week for labwork which then is a semester long.
You have to remember that a college semester course equaling 4 credit hours is *actually* 4 hours a week of classroom time PLUS approximately 12 hours a week of STUDY time. ;) So that's approximately 16 hours a week x approximately 16 weeks = 256 hours. And that's college level, not high school. (Where I get the 12 hours a week of study time is an estimated 3 hours of study per credit hour.)

The 1000 hours a year we have to count as homeschoolers in MO is JUST for homeschool recordkeeping purposes. That has nothing to do with "credit hours" for the student's transcript. Annoying, I know, as it means you're having to keep track of two different things. 8| You have to have the 1000 hours for your recordkeeping, regardless of whether you're doing high school work or not. The 120-150-180 hours needed for a "credit" is for their transcript and entrance into college. So two different things there.
I am thinking of doing 1 course at a time next year. Do the work for 1 then move on until all his credits are finished. He works better that way when it is independent.
Have you considered doing MFW's high school program which is written primarily to the student so that he can work independently and be doing college-prep work at the same time? (Yikes, how's that for a run-on sentence? %| )

http://www.mfwbooks.com/pdf/HS_Planning_Guide.pdf
http://www.mfwbooks.com/pdf/HS_Course_of_Study.pdf
Donna, with two MFW graduates and the "baby" in 11th grade! %| Using MFW since 2004.

cbollin

Re: MFW and MO 1000 hour requirement

Unread post by cbollin » Wed Nov 24, 2010 7:44 am

Another plug for MFW high school. They really make it easy with the high school credit and transcripts and all of that. Check hslda's high school website too. But yeah, the terms are all different. works easily. MFW has that easy to follow planning guide. HSLDA has similar one.
300sms wrote:Could you elaborate on that Crystal. I am looking forward to AHL as I checked out this thread http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php?f=34&t=8727 it looks like just what my son needs to speak to his heart. That is another post in itself.
Mrs. Mandy
I wasn't talking in terms of 1000 academic hours over year for MO laws, I was talking in terms of being able to confidently assign either semester or year credit on the transcript that the parents makes (or in my case, the church related school makes. LOL LOL)

MFW wrote the high school so we can be confident that it is the "transcript" credit they say it is. No offense to the Notgrass fans out there -- but I don't think Notgrass on its own is really 3 credits. So, I'm thankful that MFW fills in the missing parts so I personally have that confidence when reporting it to my umbrella school.

and I like the planning guides that MFW has for high school. Donna linked to them a little further up in the thread.

-crystal

Julie - Staff
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Re: Schedule - How to fill state requirements for hours/days

Unread post by Julie - Staff » Fri Feb 04, 2011 12:04 am

More on this topic can be found here:
http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=3965

erin.kate
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reporting ... sick days ... ot a bit

Unread post by erin.kate » Wed Jun 29, 2011 7:33 am

erin.kate wrote:I am trying to finish up my daughter's first grade portfolio for our annual assessment ... We are required to complete 175 days for our state. We did 160 MFW1, 5 unit study at Thanksgiving, 5 unit study at Christmas, and 5 field trips.

She was sick here and there, but we always made up her work along the way, but did not tack on days to the end of the year. This is the correct way to handle sick days, right? I have noted it on our "attendance" sheet, but we did not deduct those sick days from the 175 and add to the year. I figure that if she were in PS and was sick, she'd make up the work at home and not stay till July ... ;) Sound right?
I checked with our state and it's 175 days, including sick days, as long as the work was made up along the way. We have to do the 175 in a certain timeframe, so that was good to clarify. Basically, it's an honor system and extra days are not tacked on unless the sickness was excessive. Thanks, again!
♥Count it all joy ~
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2014: CTG
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♥nbamaboyz
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time spent on homeschooling

Unread post by ♥nbamaboyz » Tue Apr 09, 2013 11:09 am

laneyg wrote:Next year will be our first year of homeschooling. My kids will be in first grade and from what I understand, MFW takes about 1.5 to 3 hours a day, correct?
I live in Missouri, where the law says that we are supposed to do 1000 hours of homeschool a year. 600 of those hours are supposed to be in core subjects. I know in public school, we have about 175 days of school a year. So that's about 3.5 hours of core subjects a day.

We don't actually have to report this to anyone but I'm just curious if anyone has any suggestions or thoughts on this. Thanks!
Just a thought, for added time (especially if your children enjoy animals) My Big Book of 5min. Devotions & The Complete Book of Animals could be used along side each other. Both can be ordered from MFW. It really looks like kiddos can have alot of FUN with this as the clock ticks :O)

MelissaM
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Re: time spent on homeschooling

Unread post by MelissaM » Tue Apr 09, 2013 8:18 pm

I would call MFW's office and ask them. They are located in MO, the Hazells have homeschooled their own kids there, etc., I'm sure they have good insight. And they have always been super friendly and helpful when I've called.

:)
:)
Melissa
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lea_lpz
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Re: time spent on homeschooling

Unread post by lea_lpz » Wed Apr 10, 2013 1:37 am

So, if you did that you would be spending 6 hours a day on school with a 1st grader. Wow! That seems like a lot. I don't know about you, but honestly, anything more than 2 hours right now with my k'er and preschooler is a stretch enless we are talking fun projects, like making play dough or cooking or painting or doing some messy science experiment. 2 hour is the sweet spot right now as far as spending time on school and I feel like anything more than 3 hours next year would be too much.

I would not worry about doing 6 hours at this age, especially if you don't have to track hours. This might make sense in a brick and mortar school, but for homeschoolers, who have one on one instruction and so aren't spending time idlly waiting for the teacher to help or classmates to finish their work, it's a lot!

Think outside of the box. Your first grader is gaining life skills by say, having household chores, and play time is also important for their development and creativitiy. Going to the playground is like recess and physical education. Young children are going to be able to learn a lot by doing day to day things with their family and others. Also, remember extra curriculars, such as gymnastics or art classes as being school time. Even going on starfall and doing some independent coloring or reading time for bed. It all adds up.
ds14, dd11,ds9, dd4.5, dd2.5, dd2.5 (yep twins)

romans8x28
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Re: time spent on homeschooling

Unread post by romans8x28 » Wed Apr 10, 2013 8:20 am

I'm in MO, too. Like someone else said, pretty much anything can be counted as a core subject. Cooking and laundry are math. Church is social studies. Playing outside is science. Anytime someone reads to them is reading. As for actually keeping track of all those random minutes, though, I have no clue how to do that! I read the law to be that you didn't have to track hours until the year they are seven when you begin your school year, which would be starting in 2nd grade for us this fall (late summer). But, I can't find where I got that from on HSLDA's law section right now, so maybe I just made it up! &)
Rhonda is teaching:
Girl - 9, Boy - 7, Girl - 2, Baby in September!

2011-2012 - K-1st Ed.
2012-2013 - First-1st Ed.
2013-2014 - Adventures-2nd Ed., K-2nd Ed.
2014-2015 - ECC-2nd Ed., ECC & First-2nd Ed.

laneyg
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Re: time spent on homeschooling

Unread post by laneyg » Wed Apr 10, 2013 9:43 am

lea_lpz wrote:So, if you did that you would be spending 6 hours a day on school with a 1st grader. Wow! That seems like a lot.
...
Think outside of the box.
Well, only 3.5 on the "core" things. I figured the other 2.5 hours would totally be made up with their extracurricular activities. But you are very right about me needing to think outside the box! It's hard because they've been in public school kindergarten this year so I'm in that school mode.

lea_lpz
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Re: time spent on homeschooling

Unread post by lea_lpz » Wed Apr 10, 2013 8:45 pm

Didn't mean to come off as brash, just thought that would be a bit overwhelming for both mom and child.

I love some of the ideas mentioned on these threads about what people do as far as what they consider school and extras :)

Another idea I could think of off the top of my head, you could do more read alouds, any additional suggested activities, and read as many of the science and math literature books as you can get your hands on from the library. I believe they suggest additional science activities and play all the language and math games scheduled. You could also do more of the nature walks and journaling, maybe using field guides to identify local birds, bird calls and songs, plants and wild flowers, etc. You could spend more time on art, continuing art lessons after they are no longer scheduled and do more art appreciation. MFW also sells some Come Look With Me books you could get. The message board is active on the ideas for 1st so you will probably find "extras" that are fun you could do there. I think that could easily get you to at least 3 hours on "core" subjects.

For an extra half hour, I'd think about an early elementary foreign language program. We use La Clase Divertida for Spanish and have been spending about 15 minutes a day on that. You could also get a subscription to Starfall more for a really reasonable price and schedule 15 minutes a day of doing that as more phonics work :)

The other 2.5 hours I would think about chores as "life skills", outside time playing or going on walks, etc, and doing extra curricular activities :)
ds14, dd11,ds9, dd4.5, dd2.5, dd2.5 (yep twins)

lea_lpz
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Re: time spent on homeschooling

Unread post by lea_lpz » Thu Apr 11, 2013 12:01 am

I also thought I'd add we are going to add an etiquette for kids book to work on through the year, Every Day Grace's: A Child's Book of Good Graces and Little Annie's Book of Ettiquette and Good Manners. I just ordered it so can't tell you how I would break it down but I thought that it would compliment the study of Proverbs.

Also ordered the Rod and Staff book, Wisdom with the Millers as many have recommended as good read for MFW 1st.

If you already ordered or will be ordering soon and not start until next fall, you could comb through the mfw 1st idea board and plan any ideas for extras to do with the corresponding theme.

And I am going to get a Spanish workbook, flash cards, and picture dictionary to expand on our Spanish.

Also, maybe DVDs from the library on the science topic like magic school bus, etc, and a DVD on Bible stories that correspond with the Bible Reader? Like Greatest Hereos of the Bible.

And there is a suggestion of hymn memorization. You could get a songbook or cd on hymns. MFW sells Hide 'Em in your Heart and Wee Sing Bible Songs in their preschool packages. My kids love them and they have memorized a lot of scripture this way :)

And, although it takes most people 2 hours to do mfw1st, you might find that if you are intentionally not rushing and taking you time that it's going to take longer or your child might take longer. For expample, for us, doing mfw k takes us about 2 hours, not 1-1 1/2 hours. Add on 15 minutes of preschool time (dd's break time) and Spanish and we do about 2 1/2 hrs a day. I anticipate that mfw 1st will likely take us longer than 2 hours. I'm thinking it will be close to a 3 hour day with the Spanish and Ettiquette. Toss in preschool time and we might be at 3.5 hours myself!

My kids spend about 2 hours a day playing outside and at least an hour playing together in their room-so if that could be physical education and creative play we're hitting about 6 hours I guess. We do AWANA and AHG too!
ds14, dd11,ds9, dd4.5, dd2.5, dd2.5 (yep twins)

donutmom
Posts: 67
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enough hours?

Unread post by donutmom » Wed Jul 23, 2014 9:18 pm

laneyg wrote:We will be doing "Adventures" this year and I am just wondering if you can explain how I can get enough hours logged for our school year. We live in Missouri so we need 700 hours in core subjects and 300 of non-core. If there are 144 days of lesson plans with Adventures and each day takes maybe 4 hours, then that's only 576 hours.

I know I can count things that we do outside of these actual 4 hours that we spend with My Father's World, but I am not sure we will have enough! I wondered if there was an article on this, or if anyone has any advice for me. It seems like since My Father's World is located in Missouri too and I am sure know the law about the hours that they might have an official comment on this. And maybe I'm wrong and I'd be surprised on how many of the other little things add up, but it's kind of hard to imagine that piano lessons, sports, cooking with mom, etc would add up to be enough.....

Thank you so much for any help!
We have to do 900 hours here in PA in elementary school (although we have the option to just record days, 180 by law, which is the route I take--less counting!). We start counting in the summer, which can really help add up to the total needed. Swimming (PE), park, day trips, vacations, Vacation Bible School, etc.

We jot down when they are "mother's helper"--helping fix meals, baking cookies (eg: math when measuring), setting the table, etc. We all pitch in on cleaning days, and each kiddo has assigned tasks. Daily chores of making their bed, etc. Life skills are an important part of educating our children, so don't overlook them. They help Dad when he has projects around the house--when they were younger it was watching and holding a screwdriver or the like. Now that they're older they are able to get more involved.

Playing with legos/building blocks/K'nex (math, problem solving, art--call it whatever you want), board/card games (covers all kinds of topics, depending on the game), etc. --they build all kind of skills. When they were younger, I counted coloring (art) and crafty things they did (art, measuring, creativity, etc). Listening to music--CDs at home, concerts in the park, etc.

I counted Sunday School/children's church when needing time (singing, Bible lessons, sometimes craft, etc.). Awana or other similar program. Backyard games--kickball, throwing football with Dad, croquet, wiffle ball, badminton, etc. Any lessons they take (piano, swim, etc.), and sports they do (rec teams, etc.). Fire safety day in the community. Education videos that they just like for fun (my daughter loves to watch Signing Time videos from the library, and 2 of my kiddos like Wild America videos).

One word of advice--do NOT stress over keeping track of every last minute. That will drive you nuts. No one is going to come knocking on your door to see if every last moment is properly and correctly accounted for (at least it hasn't in PA where we have to submit quite a bit to the school district each year).

Life is full of learning--and really, much, if not most, of it is not from a book. You'll have no problem filling those hours, and they really will add up!

Does that help at all?
-Dee

laneyg
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Re: enough hours?

Unread post by laneyg » Wed Jul 23, 2014 10:14 pm

Yes, Dee! Thank you :)
I'm curious about your 180 days. You said you start counting in the summer, which we are doing too, so like when they have a tennis lesson, I log an hour for PE. But say that's all we did that day that could possibly count as anything educational. Would you count that as a day of your 180 days? I'm just curious! I would think you could count every day as a school day since it would be a rare thing that you'd do only one thing (like a tennis lesson) that would be educational in some way.
But anyway, yes that really did help. I think I will be surprised how quickly things add up... and I also will try not to stress over it!

donutmom
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Re: enough hours?

Unread post by donutmom » Wed Jul 23, 2014 10:39 pm

Actually in the summer I track time, not days. When I get to 5 hours, whether all at once or over the course of a couple of days, then I say that's a day. Does that make sense? (I "chose" 5 hours, because of our state law--says 900 hours in elem. or 180 days. 900 hours divided by 180 equals 5 hours/day. You can chose whatever number of hours you feel is appropriate. Unless you just have to count hours, and don't fuss about days.). My minimum goal is to have 15 days in by when we start the book learning in the fall. Most times it's easily reached. It makes a difference every spring when the beautiful days beckon us to come out and play!

Funny you said what you did about counting every day. I once heard from our evaluator (oh, what is that you many wonder--another of PA laws!). Anyway, she once told me that she knew a mom that would print a calendar out each year for each child. She'd give it to them at the end of the school year and say, "Circle 180 days." It didn't matter what days they circled. For her, every day was about learning or exploring or experiencing something, and not limited to only 180 days of the year. True. I'm too much a "by the book" person to go to that extreme, but it sure sounds like a lot less work for Mom!!!

-Dee

Oh, I thought of another thing from the summer. Don't know if your library has them, but we have weekly programs in the summer. I count those, too. (Can count library visits during the school year, too--when you take kiddos to pick out books.) Also, we have our kiddos read a set time each day throughout the summer (varies depending on their ages). That can add up some time easily.

laneyg
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Re: enough hours?

Unread post by laneyg » Wed Jul 23, 2014 10:43 pm

That's funny - circle 180 days! Love it :)

And yes, you made perfect sense about 5 hours equaling a day.

Thanks again, Dee :)

KellyMS
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Re: enough hours?

Unread post by KellyMS » Thu Jul 24, 2014 8:28 am

Missouri only requires 600 core hours, not 700, and a total of 1000 hours but the other 400 can be anything you want.
Hannah 5
Joshua 3
Ruth 1.5

Julie in MN
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Re: enough hours?

Unread post by Julie in MN » Thu Jul 24, 2014 8:54 am

Another thought on the calculations:
Adventures schedules 34 weeks, so I come up with 170 days rather than 144. Some of the Fridays are light, but they at least include reading and math, and often a nature walk and another scheduled activity, plus of course you can continue prayer and memory verse review and such (except the very last Friday, which can be a school party :) ).

There are some Missouri users on this compiled thread, as well (2 pages):
http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=7450

Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

KellyMS
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Re: enough hours?

Unread post by KellyMS » Thu Jul 24, 2014 9:32 am

I don't know what part of Missouri you're in but a friend mentioned this to me Sunday and it sounded like it would fit right in with the Adventures program. I had never heard of it before.

Missouri Town 1855
http://www.jacksongov.org/missouritown/

Other ideas for historical trips:
Laura Ingalls Wilder settled in Mansfield, MO
Silver Dollar City in Branson- you probably shouldn't count time on the rides (unless you're studying physics, perhaps) but there are historic aspects as well
Daniel Boone was from Missouri and it looks like there's something set up at his home
The Lewis and Clark trail runs along the Missouri River, perhaps there's a museum (or a few) somewhere
Visit the capitol
Fort Osage is near Kansas City, I don't remember what time period it's from. There may be others in the state as well.
There are several civil war battlefields in Missouri as well
Hannah 5
Joshua 3
Ruth 1.5

lea_lpz
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Re: enough hours?

Unread post by lea_lpz » Thu Jul 24, 2014 10:29 am

If you divide 1,000 hours by 180 days (36x5), then you need about 5.5 hrs of school a day. I would also look at mfw as 170 days of school (34x5). Although Friday is scheduled as a light day, it would still count as school to me. That would leave you 10 extra days, which you can easily fill with field trip days. Just plan for about 1 a month :).

As far as getting to 5.5 hours I think that's prett easy. I've never done Adv, but lets just assume Adv is going to take 3.5 hrs to complete M-Th. That's about 2 hrs to "fill". A half hour of chores, 45 min of outside time, 45 min of free play, 1 hour of an extra curricular activity, going to the local pool for the afternoon, etc., basically living life and doing the regular stuff kids do will fit the bill.

As far as Fridays or the "lite" day each week- we typically still do 5.5 hours of school, it just looks different on Fridays. After doing the scheduled mfw stuff for Friday, which in most of the various programs looks like about an hour of work, (my experience with k & 1st anyway) without the nature walk / journaling, we do other fun stuff, usually a hands on craft, and baking together. A lot of time I might save some of the more hands on stuff that's more involved for Friday, like science experiments. That'll typically get us to 3 hours. Then we pack our picnic and hit our local park day which is about 2 hours. They can help pack up for the park day trip to get that extra hald hour or they probably did a half hour of chores. That's all school to me. Or some weeks we just blow off any schedules stuff for Friday and go on a field trip. That's usually going to take 5.5+ hrs if you count getting packed up and ready to go, driving there, being at said place, and driving home.

Hope that helps.
ds14, dd11,ds9, dd4.5, dd2.5, dd2.5 (yep twins)

donutmom
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7th grade state requirements?

Unread post by donutmom » Sat Apr 25, 2015 4:03 pm

Sophia77 wrote:From what I've heard from my homeschooling friends and family, our state guidelines are almost overwhelming once you get to 7th grade. I am passionate about remaining with MFW curriculum, but I'm not sure how it will fit with all the hoops that I'm expected to jump through. Thanks for any help, pointers, or insight you can give me!
Sophia,

I've just seen your question. I've just had rare occasion to be on the boards in the past couple of years, but just happened to look today and saw your post!

I am living by their laws, and surviving!!! :-) Actually, I don't think the homeschooling guidelines for 7th-12th are that much greater than what we had to do in 6th & under. Still have to keep track of days or time, still have to submit an affidavit & objectives each year, still have an evaluation, etc. I didn't really change anything going from elementary to upper years. My oldest is just completing 11th grade and the next is finishing 8th grade. We've been using MFW since 4th grade!

The law does list specific things that must be taught in grades 7th-12th (just as they do for elementary years), but they don't specify when or how or what specifically to do those things. Most of the subjects they specify would be ones that you'd teach anyway.

I'll assume you've looked at the law and know the subjects, so won't list all those here--but things such as science, literature, etc. Some they specify--such as mathematics is to include general math, algebra, & geometry. Most everyone will do those levels anyway. History is to include world & US history, and also state history. US & world--well, if you're going to teach any history, whether you go into a specific time period or do a broad overview, it's going to include US or world history, right?!!

Now state history--well, we read library books and we take field trips and learn about our state that way. Some field trips expect to learn history; on others it comes unexpectedly.

One recent example that I wouldn't have thought would have included state history was a trip to the State Police Academy--but we got quite the history lesson. I bet you didn't know that ours was the first state to have organized, government-ordained State Police. We learned what was going on that led to that. And when they became more official (to wear uniforms), they went to England to check out how their police units were run, etc.--and our early State Police uniforms reflect the style of the bobbies of the UK!!! I just learned that. Wah-lah. . . state History when we just expected to see how you become a state trooper!! Again, the law does specify some subjects, but doesn't specify how. So we enjoy thinking outside the box here--meaning outside a "canned curriculum".

Other subjects, such as civics, we just make part of life. At election time. . . .watched debates, let kiddos look up candidates & their views on things, took them with us to the voting polls, etc. We did music via piano lessons and a child's choir at church (& MFW classical music selections). One year my son's PE was the practice hikes and the 50 mile hike he took on the Appalachian Trail. That's what I mean by the law says you have to teach specific things, but they don't specify how you do that. And just because it says geometry, or US history, doesn't mean it has to be a year long course. Nor does it say that you need to teach ALL the subjects listed every year. Just during 7th-12th grade these things need to be taught. Hope that all makes sense.

The law does look overwhelming depending from where you are coming from (my friend in another state just had to say she was homeschooling and that was the end of it--makes me jealous!!!). Yes, there are more things that have to be done by law, but it really isn't as awful as it is often made out to be. A pain. . .well, yes, the paperwork can be. Overwhelming and undo-able--absolutely not. Yes, you have to have an evaluation every year--but you pick your evaluator! And if you aren't happy with who you pick, you aren't married to them. You find someone new the next year. So you find one that is agreeable with your style of homeschooling, and you're set.

If your child wants to go to college, no matter your state law, you'd want to be keeping some paperwork anyway. And there are certain subjects that they'd want to be studying if they are headed to college. . . .most of what our law requires falls into that category. Our state law requires 4 English credits, 3 credits each of history, science, & math, and 2 credits arts & humanities. That's by no means overwhelming. MFW and what it teaches fits into all those requirements (the 7th-12th grade subject list & the graduation requirements) most excellently. We've got one kiddo with 5 years of MFW under our belts at those grade levels. . . with no issues!

Hopefully that will answer some of your questions and perhaps give you a different perspective on our law here. I'll be sure to check back to the boards to help in any way I can.

Dee

Sophia77
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon Apr 09, 2012 8:06 am

Re: 7th grade state requirements?

Unread post by Sophia77 » Sat Apr 25, 2015 6:00 pm

Dee,

Thank you SO MUCH! That was very helpful!

I looked into the requirements, but my eyes glazed over pretty quickly. That may have been influenced by several of my friends who told me that they just couldn't do it for high school and sent their kids to a regular school once they got to 7th grade. I'll definitely check them out again with all of this in mind, since I do plan to finish out high school via homeschooling.

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