Hands-on - Can MFW work if we LIKE/learn by reading??

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cbollin

Hands-on - Can MFW work if we LIKE/learn by reading??

Unread post by cbollin » Sun Oct 15, 2006 8:49 pm

qfbrenda wrote:I'm having a debate with myself for next year... My biggest fear about using MFW is that we won't have enough books, but I've been told that the book basket takes care of that.

And I'm not very good at hands-on stuff... I'm wondering if a non-hands-on mom would fit well with MFW.

But if I can add lots more books to MFW, and maybe skip some of the hands-on stuff, MFW might give me the structure that I need, but allow each kiddo to be reading at their own level rather than slowing one down and rushing another ahead.

Anyway... next year, I'll have (all boys!):
10.5 yr old, 5th grade
8 yr old, hopefully 3rd grade
6 yr old, K/1st grade
3 yr old
8 month old

I'm open to thoughts... suggestions... whatever.
Hi Brenda, welcome to the board.

One of the nice things in book basket is that each child can adjust it for their level of reading. With book basket selections you and your 3rd grader should be able to find all kinds of ideas for your 3rd grader. You could still use the books you have for your 5th grader in addition to book basket. No reason you can’t do that. There is also individual reading time “scheduled” in the daily lesson guide, so you can add as many other books (either purchased or library) as you would like. I think it is great that your oldest loves to read. And when you have to work with a 6 y.o and tend to a 3 y.o and an toddler --- what a great way for that child to still be doing school while real life is happening.

Hands on crafts. I’m not much of a craft person, but I have found that the activities in MFW are doable and done with easy to find supplies. My 5th grader tends to grab the teacher’s manual and do the set up for herself and younger sister. Be sure to check on the thread about Hands on activities really work!

I do think MFW would suggest that your 6 y.o work mostly on learning how to read, while being exposed and involved with older siblings program.

--crystal

Julie in MN
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Where to start

Unread post by Julie in MN » Sun Oct 15, 2006 10:51 pm

Here's what I would do. I would start the 2 olders together in the same program and see how it goes. I always try to get every nugget out of the bought-and-paid-for program first. Whichever you choose, use all the extra readings as well as activities that appeal to you.

Then if your eldest plows thru all the literature and has room left in his day, you could always provide him with a separate language arts program that is literature-rich. Anything from Progeny Press to Sonlight LA with readers.

MFW does outline a complete language arts programs and it is very well-rounded, with many pieces relating to your history study, and adding ILL & WS to inculde those extra pieces -- wonderful poetry selections & other specific skills. These will definitely simplify your day and allow room for things like service projects in the afternoon. Again, I might start with everything that is included and see how it works.

But Language Arts is also an area where many MFW families go off in different directions, and a literature-based language arts program might fill your need for the one child, while still teaching them together in most areas.

Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

Lucy
Posts: 442
Joined: Mon Nov 08, 2004 9:37 am

Unread post by Lucy » Mon Oct 16, 2006 2:57 pm

Hi Brenda,

I would vote for MFW ECC with extra readers for your oldest (many are listed in the MFW TM by week for this year as well). You could order them or use the library to get them.

MFW does not discuss all the books that are read and does not "assign" books. They are read at the pace of the student and are not connected with lit lessons.

MFW is easy to add more books too. Something that has not been mentioned is that MFW is a unit approach. From Bible to Music all subjects are included in a one year curriculum. So it makes it easy to add more books into many subjects not just history.

If you have other questions please ask.
Blessings,
Lucy
wife to Lee and mom to Twila 18 (girl) and Noel 16(boy). Happy MFW user since 2002.

SandKsmama
Posts: 120
Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2005 1:43 pm

Unread post by SandKsmama » Mon Oct 16, 2006 9:56 pm

I think your questions have already been answered, but I did want to chime in on the "hands on" thing. I am SO not a crafty kind of mom...I'm just not. So far, I have found the hands on stuff in MFW to be just right for me - not complicated, not made of hard-to-find materials, kid friendly (so sometimes I could give the instructions to my 9 year old and say Go for it LOL). Definitely not so much as to be overwhelming. I was doing ECC and K last year, and we did not do every single hands on thing from both of them, but I picked and chose as we got to them.

hth!
Amanda
Amanda, Wife to a great guy since '99, SAHM to 4 fabulous kids! DD(7/96), DS(1/01), DD(8/03), and baby DS (3/09)!
Used MFW K, 1st, ECC, CTG, RTR, Ex1850, and currently using 1850-Modern!

RB
Posts: 87
Joined: Wed May 09, 2007 9:14 am

Unread post by RB » Sat Mar 29, 2008 10:12 pm

Posted: Thu Dec 13, 2007 4:11 pm

Coming from a literature-based program, I can relate a bit to what you're saying. We are truly loving MFW, and my library is just fine, but sometimes I just wish it had all come in a box.

But...what I do love is the flexibility. With the all-in-a-box program, my oldest dd flew through her readers before christmas (and we skipped a couple that I didn't want her reading so soon) and it made my manual a mess and I was still hunting for books at the library. On the other hand we were always behind in science, also messing up our weeks :)

It is helpful for me to remember that book basket has both pros and cons, but for us the pros outweigh the cons. I love the fact that this year our books have fit our family very well. We request what we think will work, and if it doesn't we move on to the next one. But we have only skipped a few, really, because they are so good and age appropriate.

I think next year we may order some of the starred books for ECC, and continue to use the library as well. Best of book basket luck to you :)

caod
Posts: 52
Joined: Sun Jun 04, 2006 8:29 pm

Looking back at benefits of hands-on

Unread post by caod » Wed Jun 18, 2008 10:33 pm

Posted: Sat Feb 16, 2008 7:44 pm
This is my second year with MFW. I am not a "hand's on" person. I confess that I don't do many of the hands on projects. I think that that would be great and beneficial just not me. That is not to say that pulling me out of my comfort zone is not a good thing.

But....even though I don't do many of the hand's on projects I have found that when I worked the curriculum and then stepped back and looked at the big picture of what my children (and me) have learned I was thrilled. The Bible and History and Science are all blending together in very small ways but the pieces are put together in a very nice way. Something that few programs cannot offer.

I think understanding the philosophy of where MFW is coming from could make a big difference for you. Getting one of David's lectures could help you understand why the curriculum is written as it is.

Don't focus solely on one day or one week. Think big picture. I don't think you will "LOVE" MFW world until you are several months into it. It was then that the lights came on for me and I said, "Oh I get where she is going now". When we buy a curriculum we are basically trusting the people who wrote it. You have to decide who you want to trust.

Certainly I don't mean that trusting any other curriculum is a bad choice. It wasn't my choice. I would guess you suffer from thinking there is always something a little better. I am that kind of person. I second guess many decisions I make thinking that maybe there was a better deal to had elsewhere.

I have had to embrace the saying "don't doubt in the dark what God shows you in the light."

When we do the hands on it is often not on the schedule in the manual. Sometimes it is a Saturday when it just happens to fit in. Sometimes I find it interesting enough and doable enough for me that we do it on the right day. Sometimes we cook the food on the day planned and sometimes it is a weed later that I cook it and then we talk about how it relates to what we were doing. And sometimes it just doesn't get done. Sometimes I just pick several projects to do and we do them in one day, especially when I can see we are hitting a little burn out with the structured stuff.

This is too long and I don't know if I made myself clear. I would just challenge you to think, big picture.
Connie

LSH in MS
Posts: 208
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Compare CTG, RTR, etc. with Literature programs

Unread post by LSH in MS » Thu Aug 27, 2009 1:00 pm

I haven't done a literature program but just wanted you to know that although MFW has hand on activities, it's not really crafty. I am not a crafty mom and my boys are the read and go type, but they have enjoyed the hands on that is included in MFW. It is not overwhelming. My 6th grader this year is supervising the science experiments and reading the text to his younger brothers so I can help my 7th grader.

As far as reading, you can read as much as you want. There are hundreds of books listed in the book list, that you can use for book basket, but also for independent reading. Independent reading is scheduled for at least 30 minutes per day but my son often does more. I select specific titles for my dc to read for that year in addition to the read alouds and book basket. They are usually historical fiction or biographies but I also select literature that is not related to the history for a change of pace.
Lori

wife to Clifford, mother to ds (17), ds (16), ds (15, ds (13), ds (8), and ds (3)
MFW user for 10 years

Julie in MN
Posts: 2927
Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 3:44 pm
Location: Minnesota

Re: Compare CTG, RTR, etc. with Literature programs

Unread post by Julie in MN » Sat Aug 29, 2009 2:50 pm

Hi there,
I was interested to see many of the same books used in different literature programs -- some use SOTW, Genevieve Foster, Usborne, & Bronze Bow. Hmmm... that must make it hard for you to make a comparison!

Here are some random thoughts about the differences from my point of view -- a person who used other programs a little & is about to start our 6th year with MFW. I'm sure you will find other points of view on other boards, but I hope this helps you see things from this end.

-- One problem I had with literature programs was the feeling that my dd needed to glean information from reading stories, and she wasn't always gleaning any historical information this way. Sometimes even *I* had to guess what were the important points that week. Even for books with "discussion questions," the information seemed random & not always very important. For me, MFW organizes our learning topically and we both understand what is being learned for the day. I think of MFW as providing a solid framework, and I am free to decorate it as I like :)

-- Along the same lines, MFW combines different readings and activities together to learn about the topic of the day. Games and even cooking seem to help us stop & absorb something before we go on. (Even though I'm a bad cook :~ .)

-- I love how MFW includes art and music into the study of the world. It's not overwhelming, but it's consistent over time. We don't read whole novels on composers or artists, but we are continually increasing our awareness of the reflection of worldview in music and art.
.
-- I felt overwhelmed and pressured with the amount of reading in literature programs. I was surprised when about half of the reading in some programs was unimportant books like Dear Mr. Henshaw. Now, I am very much in favor of giving my kids a break with some easy reading, but I felt it was odd to "require" a particular book like that to be purchased in a package & scheduled in a guide. With MFW, I feel confident that if a book is scheduled, it is essential to learning the subject matter. If I wish to assign extra books, I feel confident that MFW will provide an exhaustive list of relevant books (with reviews) as well as a short list of classics (which don't really need reviews). But when my son is into science books or silly books, we are free as a bird to go read those.

-- Mapping is recommended in some literature programs but often I never figured out how to do it, even after asking questions on their board and searching the extensive teacher notes. The mapping in MFW has been excellent and my son really understands the layout of the world.

-- I love how MFW separates out the Old Testament and the New Testament, so you can be immersed in them, both having more time for reading from them & learning about the time that those important people lived on the earth. In CTG, there is no time for the NT or even for SOTW-1, because the Old Testament is so full of history & the other related books do not need to be spines, but instead are enrichment & adding in other cultures.

-- I love how MFW *doesn't* separate out American and Asian history into separate years

-- I love how MFW uses one teacher's guide for all subjects. In the programs I used, there were different teacher guides for different subjects.

Okay, does that help at all?
Julie
P.S. There are a lot more comparisons here: http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=4098
Last edited by Julie in MN on Mon Apr 12, 2010 2:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

Blessed
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Location: Canada

Re: Compare CTG, RTR, etc. with Sonlight's Core 6 & 7

Unread post by Blessed » Mon Dec 28, 2009 9:41 pm

Hi, I know this is an old post that I am reading....but your response, Julie, hit very close to home for me. It was very reassuring and timely for me to read. We are due to begin RtR next week. Thank you for sharing :)
Annie
Mom to two, dd(10) and ds(8)
New to MFW, RtR Jan 2010
SL Cores C,1 & partial 2 used 2007-2009
Come Sit by Me used 2005-2006
BFIAR & FIAR used 2004

beaglemamma2008
Posts: 60
Joined: Sat Aug 16, 2008 12:37 am
Location: Southeast Texas
Contact:

Should we switch back?

Unread post by beaglemamma2008 » Thu Apr 14, 2011 9:17 am

OtterMommy wrote:I am wondering what to do... We finished up MFW K and 1st this year (already!) with my two oldest. So, we started another program. BUT, while I love the reading, the time commitment is killing me! I did not enjoy all the hands-on things in the lower grades of MFW; we skipped most of them, and the kids didn't mind. Often, my kids can be found doing similar activities on their own.

1st was a bit "easy" for my son (turned 6 in October), and we often did 2 days at once. K was "easy" for my daughter (just turned 5). Another BUT...they were both learning! I don't want to plan out my own curriculum since we are moving. I want easy (for me). Should we do ADV? I also don't understand what exactly my son will be reading (our program includes a set of readers for each child). I do think I would enjoy having the "grid" format for me! I did love having the MFW Student Workbook in 1st and Bible Notebook so he now has two great things to show for his efforts. Any advice? (Oh, we have a 3-year-old tagging along and a 4-month-old.)
I'm probably a little biased because we love MFW, but I would definitely say to go with Adventures. Easy isn't a bad thing, especially if your kids are learning. :) It's a great time to build confidence and help them see that learning is fun, not drudgery.

As for what your kids will read, there is an extensive list of suggested books in the back of the TM. Plus, you'll get several great read-alouds with the package. Even the "texts" have been enjoyable in our house. (My kids both get excited when I pull American Pioneers and Patriots off the shelves!) And if you don't like the hands-on activities, feel free to skip them. "It's my school, and I'll do what I want!" :)

Oh, and there's not a notebook in Adventures like there was in 1st, but there are notebooking pages throughout the year, as well as state sheets and map work, so they have a great keepsake of all their hard work at the year's end.

Peace to you as you make your decision! :)
Jennifer, mom to:
Hannah, 8. Finished and loved K, 1st, & Adventures. Currently loving ECC.
Millie, 5. Finished Pre-K and K "lite." Currently playing her way through K "for real."

http://www.trainingthemup.blogspot.com

OtterMommy
Posts: 17
Joined: Tue Aug 25, 2009 2:52 pm

Re: Should we switch back?

Unread post by OtterMommy » Thu Apr 14, 2011 9:22 am

:-) I saw the pages on your blog! Thanks! I am loving reading with the kids (with SL), but I like to check things off lists, and there's no way we could keep up! I would also love to stick with 1st for my 5-year-old to complete her phonics, and then do it over again in the future with the others! Thankfully, SL has a great return policy! AND, since the money has already been spent, I will have money to invest in some more books (since we will be traveling, we can't use a library very well!). I will admit that my kids loved everything we actually did with MFW. I was skipping the music and coloring book in 1st, but my son discovered them one day and LOVED them.
Wife to the best
Mom to ds (6), dd (5), dd (3), and ds (4 months)
MFW K and 1st

beaglemamma2008
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Re: Should we switch back?

Unread post by beaglemamma2008 » Thu Apr 14, 2011 9:35 am

OtterMommy wrote::-) I saw the pages on your blog! Thanks! I will admit that my kids loved everything we actually did with MFW.

Mine, too. :) I usually have to give myself quite a pep talk before I drag out the supplies for craft projects or science experiments, but my kids love doing those things and learn so much from them, so how can I not do them, kwim? Plus, they stay out in the school room for the rest of the year, so the Vikings and Christopher Columbus and Native American Indians and Jamestown, etc., are never out of their minds. It's not just some unit they did once back at the beginning of the year and forgot; they have a constant reminder of what they learned so it helps them retain it better. (At least that's the way I think it works! :-) )
OtterMommy wrote:I was skipping the music and coloring book in 1st, but my son discovered them one day and LOVED them.
I had the same problem! Granted, 1st was a tough year for us because we were rebuilding after a major hurricane, but we were very hit or miss with the music. Even so, as we have listened to our Tchaikovsky pieces this year, the kids will point out, "Mom, that sounded like a french horn!" or "I love the sound of the clarinet there!" :~ That's all from the little bit of music we did get around to in 1st because there's not one.single.drop. of musical knowledge anywhere in this house aside from what we get in school! :-)
OtterMommy wrote:I am loving reading with the kids now, but I like to check things off lists, and there's no way we could keep up! I would also love to stick with 1st for my 5-year-old to complete her phonics, and then do it over again in the future with the others!
Not to sway you one way or the other, but there's a slight chance that I may be a curriculum junkie and therefore have gone through both the Sonlight and Heart of Dakota catalogs to the point of memorization. ;) What I have found from this little sickness of mine is that so many of these great vendors use the same books, just in different ways or at different times. So please don't think you have to choose either the "doability" of My Father's World or the great literature of Sonlight. Most of the books Sonlight uses are also recommended in the book lists at the back of the My Father's World TM's at some point or another, so eventually you'll get to read them. They're just organized a little differently. :)
Jennifer, mom to:
Hannah, 8. Finished and loved K, 1st, & Adventures. Currently loving ECC.
Millie, 5. Finished Pre-K and K "lite." Currently playing her way through K "for real."

http://www.trainingthemup.blogspot.com

Mom2theteam
Posts: 184
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Re: Should we switch back?

Unread post by Mom2theteam » Thu Apr 14, 2011 1:33 pm

beaglemamma2008 wrote:What I have found from this little sickness of mine is that so many of these great vendors use the same books, just in different ways or at different times. So please don't think you have to choose either the "doability" of My Father's World or the great literature of Sonlight. Most of the books Sonlight uses are also recommended in the book lists at the back of the My Father's World TM's at some point or another, so eventually you'll get to read them. They're just organized a little differently. :)
This is awesome to know! I have looked and looked and looked at the different curricula. I did finally decide to go with MFW K and I'm confident in that decision. However, I do frequently look back at others and wonder if I should work on incorporating all their literature also. I've even thought about buying all the books. :~ But, I have 5 kids 5 and under. I don't have the time. I have been able to use some self-control and have not looked much beyond their Core. After reading this, I am even more confident that MFW is where we need to be. I'm hoping we will get the good lit without some of the questionable content I've heard about and we will get the hands on too. Woo Hoo! The more I read about the MFW program as a whole, the more I can't wait to really get into it. I'm so excited about each new year and I haven't even really started K yet! Ha, ha. My poor kids. ;)
Heather
Wife to an amazing man
Mom to 6, ages 10, 7, 7, 5, 5, 3
Zack, 10 CtG
Samantha & Blake, twins, 7, CtG
Matthew & Joshua, twins, 5, MFW K
Nicholas, 3 derailing and tagging along

OtterMommy
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Re: Should we switch back?

Unread post by OtterMommy » Thu Apr 14, 2011 1:36 pm

I was noticing the same thing! I was just telling DH today that I think I prefer the Book Basket better, since we tend to go through our Read-Alouds quickly. I don't like telling the kids, "No more today." But, then I hate being "off schedule". We've already read quite a few of the ones for the next two Cores, so I'd also like to expand our horizons to other books. I was also noticing that we really enjoyed adding things in: other Bible memorization (my son finished 2 Awana books and review books this year), thinking skills, etc. We don't have time for that right now... I am still a tad nervous about the "portability" of ADV if we spend a few months on the road. Thoughts?! ;)

Oh, and I AM a curriculum junkie; my hubby makes me get rid of the catalogs once I get settled (hence, not remembering what exactly is in ADV)! We started with HOD, then MFW, then SL... I wanted to design my own this year, but with moving and going into fulltime ministry, I know I don't have the time. I'd rather someone else give me some structure and let me spend the time with my kids!

It doesn't help me that all my siblings were homeschooled, and we grew up knowing so many others who homeschooled, so I've heard every reason for every curricula under the sun! I do feel a bit of relief going back to MFW!
Wife to the best
Mom to ds (6), dd (5), dd (3), and ds (4 months)
MFW K and 1st

MrsRobinson
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Re: Should we switch back?

Unread post by MrsRobinson » Fri Apr 15, 2011 11:29 am

beaglemamma2008 wrote:but there's a slight chance that I may be a curriculum junkie and therefore have gone through both the Sonlight and Heart of Dakota catalogs to the point of memorization.
:-) Thank you, thank you, thank you......now I know that I am not the only one!!!

After being torn between all of the Curriculum you listed I can say without any doubt that I adore MFW.
I have been homeschooling for 11 years. I have done it all. I don't know what was wrong with me that I would glance at the MFW booth and catalogs, but never try it. I honestly think it is because I had to go through all those years trying all of those out so that I could appreciate what I have now in MFW. Yes, they use all of the books I loved about all of the other programs. But, I have found their plans to be the most doable {for me and my family}

I gained a lot of confidence in MFW from listening to the workshops on cd. Hearing the authors of this curriculum talk about various aspects homeschooling and learning made me trust what they were offering.

One more thing that helped me.....
I either went and took myself off of the mailing list of the ones that tempted me the most or I just throw them directly in the trash! (I used to take all of the catalogs to be with me) :~

This ramble may not mean anything to you and your situation, I just had to chime in.
Blessings!
Wife to the sweetest man on earth, who is my pastor also. Mom to 4 blessings.
Doing MFW 1st, RtR, WHL
I blog at http://www.treasuresunseen.blogspot.com

marsha617
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Re: Should we switch back?

Unread post by marsha617 » Fri Apr 15, 2011 2:12 pm

Adventures was a wonderful program! There are so many lasting memories from last year. You certainly don't have to do every science experiment. One a week perhaps along with a history activity would be fine. I really do not think you will be disappointed and neither will your children. :-)

Marsha
Andrew 10
Nathan 8
Ryan 5
Josh 2
Yes, we have ALL boys. Life is fun and always interesting!
MFW since 2008; CTG this coming school yr.

gorillamama
Posts: 20
Joined: Wed Jun 22, 2011 4:41 pm

Not doing the experiments

Unread post by gorillamama » Thu Nov 03, 2011 9:34 pm

far above rubies wrote:We just completed our 11th week of ECC (still loving it), except the science experiments. I guess I'm just wondering if someone can give me permission to say "It's OK!" We find reading the books very interesting and if there's a worksheet that goes with it, it's super, but as for the other experiments, they're just falling flat or just not happening at the moment.
We are just finishing up our 11th week in ECC (and also loving it!)As with all things homeschooling, you do what is best for you and your family. If the experiments are too time consuming, if you don't have the materials on hand, if you just feel like, "Nah, not today with this one...", it's OK! (There, I said it for you ;) )

We have been trying to do things as time/materials, etc. permit, but not always with resounding success, so a "try and you fail hold your head up high" mentality is working for us at the moment. In spite of dead earthworms, cracked eggshells, and no potato garden, this has been our best homeschooling year yet (out of 6+)!!!

If it is a time/effort thing for you all that is keeping the experiments from taking off, I have a bit of insight that has helped us and may help you, too. Reading the experiments often seems like "Oh, no! We can't do this..." but then I'd just go ahead with it and get as far as I could and actually found it was way easier than I thought and didn't take much time at all and the kids usually loved whatever it was we did, so it made it easier the next time an experiment came up. It just seemed daunting, but actually wasn't. This may not pertain to your situation at all, just thought I'd throw it out there.

Hope that helps!

Crystal (gorillamama)

far above rubies
Posts: 75
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Re: Not doing the experiments

Unread post by far above rubies » Thu Nov 03, 2011 9:59 pm

I think it's a mix between they're falling flat and time. LOL When I do get the materials, we do the experiment and the children don't really care if it falls flat because they like the interaction. I, OTOH, get frustrated because my life is a bit chaotic right now, especially with the just turned 3 months old, and my goodness, if I've gone to the trouble to buy the materials, I want that baby to work!!! Why, oh, why does it take longer to get back on one's feet the more children one has?

Anyway..... we didn't do the egg or feather experiment this week but we read the pages that fit the Rainforest and honestly, the children didn't really seem to miss out on anything.

They love to do science experiments, but they also do 10 minutes of PACE work and have done the experiments in those.

My concern is that stress over the experiments is possibly taking away from the enjoyment of it. We are just really enjoying learning about the different cultures, playing the Geography game, etc.
K (2007-2008, 2011-2012), ADV (2010-2011), ECC (2011-2012)
2012-2013: CtG [dd (5th), ds (3rd), dd (1st), ds (3), and ds (1) ]

betancourt6
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Re: Not doing the experiments

Unread post by betancourt6 » Thu Nov 03, 2011 10:01 pm

Thank you so much for posting this question/concern and the suggestions, ladies! I am also new to homeschooling and MFW ECC, and was so worried that we were behind since we hadn't completed ALL of the experiments to date. We have been enjoying MFW so much, and know that it has been a God-send to our family. Thanks again and God Bless!
The Betancourt 6:
Jackie B.
Married for 21+ years to Joe
Sons 21 & 11, Daughters 16 & 14
2015-2016: Expl-1850, AHL, US to 1877

cbollin

Re: Not doing the experiments

Unread post by cbollin » Fri Nov 04, 2011 4:33 am

If you buy the materials and want to do the experiments, can your husband help on weekends as fun time? Your children like the interaction time. No one says it has to be done on the same day. or save stuff for afternoons when all other school work (including the extras that you are doing) are done and the kids can read the instructions for themselves and try it on their own......

on the other hand, if you never do them, life goes on and you're not a bad teacher. If you dont' get them all done, it's ok. lots of group schools don't necessarily get to lots of experiments either. ;)

if and when you do try some of them.....Think Process over Product with experiments though...... that might reduce your stress on it.

for the egg in brazil weeks.. here's a picture to enjoy with your family.
http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php ... 161#p24764

and stuff like the ongoing terrarium... that doesn't require a lot of work to make it work. I was so surprised how long ours lasted (including being moved to a new state),

and... some of these things will be repeated in General Science.

Amy C.
Posts: 202
Joined: Thu Apr 30, 2009 9:12 am

Re: Not doing the experiments

Unread post by Amy C. » Fri Nov 04, 2011 10:13 am

I just wanted to say that we have done ECC and CTG and are now doing RTR. We have never done all of the science projects.We tried to do as many as we could, but on the days we couldn't do them, we would read the info about it. Of the ones we did, some worked and some didn't. I know what we do is not nesessarily what everyone else needs to do but just giving you "permission" from me ( :-) )to let some of it go if need be. We did try to do as many as we could, and by the time we got to CTG, my older two (and even my 6 y/o tagging along with them) could be more independent with their experiments. They pretty much had to be. I had my 4th child first of Sept. last year. Even though we did not do all of the experiments in CTG, we enjoyed the ones we did do. We liked the AIG book. My oldest is doing Apologia General this year, and he is doing all his experiments. I don't think he missed out the last two years not doing every scheduled science project. I looked at it like a fun intro to Jr. High science that would be kicking it up a notch. So I would say just do the ones you can and enjoy (even if they fail). It bothered me at first if one failed, but we would retry if we had the time and resources and if we didn't or it failed again, I chalked it up to learning through the process, not necessarily the end result. When life is so busy, sometimes we just have to let something go and sometimes that something at my house would be a science project here and there.

HTH,
Amy C.

Julie in MN
Posts: 2927
Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 3:44 pm
Location: Minnesota

MFW & Visual Spatial Learners?

Unread post by Julie in MN » Fri Feb 01, 2013 8:01 pm

mshanson3121 wrote:So I've been putting thought into figuring out what kind of learner my son is, and it seems like he is mostly a Visual-Spatial learner. He tunes out with too much auditory input, he hates sitting and listening as I read scripted material to him, it has to be short and sweet or else he tunes out. Likewise, textbooks don't work at all. While he loves being read to, the book has to have a LOT of pictures. Usbourne books are a real hit for him, and ever since he was 3 he has LOVED sitting and looking at encyclopedias. In fact, he will often ask us to read him an animal encyclopedia for a bedtime story! He loves books like that where you go through and show him the picture and tell him what it is. He loves drawing and coloring, really doesn't like copywork/writing. He loves hands-on projects.

So how well does MFW work with Visual-Spatial learners?
Can't remember what age of child we're talking about here?

For "visual" kids that need to look at the words, I've heard of families where that child sits alongside mom and reads along, or he has his own copy of the book and reads along while mom or the audio read aloud. Another technique that I used in college was taking notes as I listened; that way, it didn't all float "out the other ear." Notes don't have to be in words, either. Lots of diagrams and webs are popular, and can be found online.

For "visual" kids who think in pictures, I think notebooking can suit their style. As long as he can tell back what the notebook page is saying "to him," then I wouldn't think it would matter whether he sketched, painted, copy-pasted, etc. There are alternative methods posted around the archives, such as:
don't like to color, draw, narrate, etc http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=3649
1st grade bible notebook alternatives http://board.mfwbooks.com/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=2299

It's good to have your child try different strategies during these years, so he figures out what works best for him. We all might need to handle learning in different ways, but we benefit from figuring out how we can get the most out of it. I've even lately heard of college kids who choose professors (if there are several to choose from) according to whether they expect written papers vs. tests vs. projects etc.

Julie
Julie, married 29 yrs, finding our way without Shane
(http://www.CaringBridge.org/visit/ShaneHansell)
Reid (21) college student; used MFW 3rd-12th grades (2004-2014)
Alexandra (29) mother; hs from 10th grade (2002)
Travis (32) engineer; never hs

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